Emily K. Drake

Emily K. Drake
Dalhousie University | Dal · Faculty of Health

BScH, MA

About

24
Publications
1,019
Reads
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140
Citations

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
It is without question that the Internet has democratized access to medical information, with estimates that 70% of the American population use it as a resource, particularly for cancer-related information. Such unfettered access to information has led to an increase in health misinformation. Fortunately, the data indicate that health care professi...
Article
The use of social media continues to increase in health care and academia. Health care practice, particularly the oncologic field, is constantly changing because of new knowledge, evidence-based research, clinical trials, and government policies. Therefore, oncology trainees and professionals continue to strive to stay up-to-date with practice guid...
Article
Full-text available
Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer desire peer support and require support programs that address their unique needs. This study investigated the need for, and barriers to, peer support and preferences for digital peer navigation among AYA. A cross-sectional survey was administered to AYA, diagnosed with cancer between the ages of 15–39,...
Article
Objective: The objective of this scoping review was to explore, characterize, and map the literature on interventions and intervention components implemented to change emergency department clinicians' behavior related to suicide prevention using the Behaviour Change Wheel as a guiding theoretical framework. Introduction: An emergency department...
Article
Objective: This review will provide an overview of the evidence on what is known about the delivery of palliative and end-of-life care to adolescents and young adults living with cancer, by identifying knowledge gaps, and discussing the key characteristics and types of evidence in this field. Introduction: Adolescents and young adults receive th...
Article
Full-text available
Background Health researchers are increasingly using social media in a professional capacity, and the applications of social media for health researchers are vast. However, there is currently no published evidence synthesis of the ways in which health researchers use social media professionally, and uncertainty remains as to how best to harness its...
Article
There is limited research on young adults (YAs) living with cancer and even less concerning those with metastatic/advanced disease. The purpose of this scoping review was to map and summarize the current state of empirical research on the psychosocial experiences of YAs living with metastatic/advanced cancer, highlighting gaps in the published lite...
Article
Purpose: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with terminal cancer are a marginalized population with unique medical and psychosocial needs. AYAs commonly report challenges with their health care experiences, however, little is known about the experiences of the health care providers (HCPs) who deliver this specialized care. The purpose of the curre...
Article
Aims and objectives This scoping review uses intersectional feminism to inform a systematic synthesis of what is known about the maternal health outcomes of incarcerated women. Background: Despite rising imprisonment of women, there is a lack of research, from a feminist perspective, on perinatal health outcomes among incarcerated women. Design Sy...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Health researchers are increasingly using social media in a professional capacity, and the applications of social media for health researchers are vast. However, there is currently no published evidence synthesis of the ways in which health researchers use social media professionally, and uncertainty remains as to how best to harness its...
Article
This study explored young adult (YA; 18-39 years of age) cancer survivors' perspectives on and experiences with return to work (RTW) following primary cancer treatment. A prospective qualitative longitudinal method was employed, using in-depth telephone interviews at three time points. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Five people (ages 2...
Conference Paper
Background: Worldwide, the number of people surviving cancer long-term is growing. This is due to an increase in incidence rates, coupled with earlier detection and improved treatments. Among the difficulties many cancer survivors face are the unique challenges associated with reintegrating back into the work environment after an absence for primar...
Article
Full-text available
Over 70,000 adolescent and young adults (AYA) aged 15 to 39 years are diagnosed with cancer each year in the US. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has identified AYA cancer patients as a unique population. The most common cancers in this age group include tumors typically seen in pediatric patients such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and b...

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