Emily A. Aery Jones

Emily A. Aery Jones
Stanford University | SU · Department of Neurobiology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

12
Publications
5,837
Reads
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271
Citations
Introduction
I am a postdoc in Dr. Lisa Giocomo's lab at Stanford University researching spatial coding in the entorhinal cortex. I recently completed my PhD at UCSF in the lab of Dr. Yadong Huang and co-mentored by Dr. Loren Frank. My thesis work measured hippocampal sharp-wave ripples as a potential biomarker for Alzheimer's disease and after suppressing specific interneuron classes.
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - October 2019
University of California, San Francisco
Position
  • Graduate Student
May 2013 - May 2014
University of Maryland, College Park
Position
  • Undergraduate Research Assistant
May 2011 - May 2014
University of Maryland, College Park
Position
  • Undergraduate Research Assistant (Gemstone Honors Program)
Education
September 2014 - October 2019
University of California, San Francisco
Field of study
  • Biomedical Sciences
September 2010 - May 2014
University of Maryland, College Park
Field of study
  • Biological Science: Physiology and Neurobiology
September 2010 - May 2014
University of Maryland, College Park
Field of study
  • Computer Science

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Specific classes of GABAergic neurons play specific roles in regulating information processing in the brain. In the hippocampus, two major classes, parvalbumin-expressing (PV⁺) and somatostatin-expressing (SST⁺), differentially regulate endogenous firing patterns and target subcellular compartments of principal cells. How these classes regulate the...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by progressive memory loss, and there is a pressing need to identify early pathophysiological alterations that predict subsequent memory impairment. Hippocampal sharp-wave ripples (SWRs)—electrophysiological signatures of memory reactivation in the hippocampus—are a compelling candidate for this purpose. Mo...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), increasing risk and decreasing age of disease onset. Many studies have demonstrated the detrimental effects of apoE4 in varying cellular contexts. However, the underlying mechanisms explaining how apoE4 leads to cognitive decline are not fully understood...
Article
Full-text available
The evident genetic, pathological and clinical heterogeneity of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) poses challenges for traditional drug development. We conducted a computational drug-repurposing screen for drugs to treat apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4)-related AD. We first established APOE genotype-dependent transcriptomic signatures of AD by analyzing publicly a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Specific classes of GABAergic neurons are thought to play specific roles in regulating information processing in the brain. In the hippocampus, two major classes - parvalbumin-expressing (PV+) and somatostatin-expressing (SST+) neurons - differentially regulate endogenous firing patterns and target different subcellular compartments of principal ce...
Article
Full-text available
Despite its clear impact on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) risk, apolipoprotein (apo) E4’s contributions to AD etiology remain poorly understood. Progress in answering this and other questions in AD research has been limited by an inability to model human-specific phenotypes in an in vivo environment. Here we transplant human induced pluripotent stem cel...
Preprint
Full-text available
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive memory loss, and there is a pressing need to identify early pathophysiological alterations that predict subsequent memory impairment. Hippocampal sharp-wave ripples (SWRs) - electrophysiological signatures of memory reactivation in the hippocampus - are a compelling candidate for doing so. Mo...
Article
Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the mechanism by which it causes cognitive decline is unclear. In knockin (KI) mice, human apoE4 causes age-dependent learning and memory impairments and degeneration of GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Here we report two functional ap...
Article
Full-text available
Prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) is linked to numerous psychiatric disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Current literature suggests that core deficits observed in ADHD reflect abnormal inhibitory control governed by the prefrontal cortex. Yet, it is unclear how neural activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) i...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am doing a series of 2 surgeries: the first surgery involves removing a small section of skull, and the second surgery involves implanting a recording electrode which requires a good amount of the skull to build up glue on. To build a good base, ideally I would be able to fill the craniectomy from the original surgery with something like bone wax.  Does anyone have any experience with closing craniectomies?

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