Émilie Saulnier-Talbot

Émilie Saulnier-Talbot
Laval University | ULAVAL · Departments of biology and of geography

Ph.D
Assistant professor, global change scientist

About

66
Publications
18,738
Reads
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2,073
Citations
Citations since 2017
29 Research Items
1148 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
Introduction
I am an environmental researcher relying mainly on the paleolimnological approach. My main research interests are quantifying the effects of global change on the distribution and quality of aquatic resources; investigating long-term dynamics of biodiversity in aquatic environments; identifying causes and consequences of water resources depletion and pollution; assessing aquatic ecosystem exposure and vulnerability to climate change and human stressors.
Additional affiliations
January 2015 - May 2015
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Paleoecological context surrounding initial human presence in the Alaska Range, AK
February 2014 - August 2014
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Post-glacial environmental change and mega-faunal extinctions on the Pribilof Is., AK
October 2012 - August 2013
University of Otago
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Long-term water quality of South Island freshwater ecosystems
Education
September 2001 - December 2007
Laval University
Field of study
  • Geography
January 1998 - July 2000
Laval University
Field of study
  • Geography
September 1994 - April 1998
Laval University
Field of study
  • Geographie

Publications

Publications (66)
Article
Full-text available
Ports play a central role in our society, but they entail potential environmental risks and stressors that may cause detrimental impacts to both neighboring natural ecosystems and human health. Port managers face multiple challenges to mitigate risks and avoid ecosystem impacts and should recognize that ports are embedded in the wider regional coas...
Article
Sedimentary diatoms have been used to quantitatively reconstruct climate‐related variables, such as temperature at different timescales. Even though temperature is often less of a key driver of diatom ecology than other environmental parameters (water chemistry), diatom inference models have been shown to be reliable in deducing past temperature tr...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and other anthropogenic stressors have led to long-term changes in the thermal structure, including surface temperatures, deepwater temperatures, and vertical thermal gradients, in many lakes around the world. Though many studies highlight warming of surface water temperatures in lakes worldwide, less is known about long-term trends...
Article
Full-text available
The concentration of dissolved oxygen in aquatic systems helps to regulate biodiversity1,2, nutrient biogeochemistry3, greenhouse gas emissions4, and the quality of drinking water5. The long-term declines in dissolved oxygen concentrations in coastal and ocean waters have been linked to climate warming and human activity6,7, but little is known abo...
Article
The Arctic has warmed significantly over the past decades. However, the evolution of Arctic climate during the Holocene remains to be clarified in more detail, and regional factors controlling aquatic ecosystem evolution need to be better defined to grasp the sensitivity of lakes to rapid environmental change. Nettilling Lake was studied for change...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, lake surface water temperatures have warmed rapidly relative to air temperature, but changes in deepwater temperatures and vertical thermal structure are still largely unknown. We have compiled the most comprehensive data set to date of long-term (1970-2009) summertime vertical temperature profiles in lakes across the world to examine tre...
Article
Human-made wetlands play an important role in maintaining biodiversity and provide a wealth of ecosystem services. In 1996, abandoned farmland near Neuville (Québec, Canada) was flooded to create what is now the marais Léon- Provancher. In 2016, the water quality of this artificially created marsh was analyzed, and a biomonitoring approach using di...
Article
• Climate change poses a significant threat to Arctic freshwater biodiversity, but impacts depend upon the strength of organism response to climate‐related drivers. Currently, there is insufficient knowledge about Arctic freshwater biodiversity patterns to guide assessment, prediction, and management of biodiversity change. • As part of the Circump...
Article
Full-text available
Comprehensive assessments of contemporary diatom distributions across the Arctic remain scarce. Furthermore, studies tracking species compositional differences across space and time, as well as diatom responses to climate warming, are mainly limited to paleolimnological studies due to a lack of routine monitoring in lakes and streams across vast ar...
Article
Ecotones mark zones of rapid change in ecological structure at various spatial scales. They are believed to be particularly susceptible to shifts caused by environmental transformation, making them key regions for studying the effects of global change. Here, we explored the variation in assemblage structure of aquatic primary producer and consumer...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Sedimentary diatoms have been successfully used to quantitatively reconstruct diverse limnological variables, including temperature, at various timescales. Even though temperature is often less of a key driver of diatom ecology than other environmental parameters (such as water chemistry), inference models based on diatom assemblage composition hav...
Technical Report
Full-text available
CAFF Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program State of Arctic Freshwater Biodiversity Report.
Article
Full-text available
We present here the results of multi-proxy analyses (sediment geochemistry, diatoms, and pollen) from sediment cores collected at four lakes in the middle Susitna Valley, Alaska. These lakes form a transect from the tundra to the boreal forest. The retrieved cores span from ∼12,000 cal yr BP to the present, with age control provided by radiometric...
Article
Full-text available
Aquatic ecosystems in tropical regions remain understudied and their long-term dynamics poorly understood. In East Africa, a better understanding of how natural communities of primary producers in small freshwater ecosystems respond to climatic variability is needed to improve management and conservation of aquatic resources. This study explored th...
Article
Full-text available
Declining water quality in reservoirs is of growing concern in many regions, yet there is still little understanding of long-term water quality trends in these systems. Across the landscape, reservoirs have diverse origins, functions, and operational strategies. In temperate environments, winter water-level drawdown is a common operational practice...
Article
Full-text available
Misleading advertisements for academic jobs are infuriating for everyone. Can we stop them?
Data
Detailed multiproxy paleolimnological data from Lake Hill, St. Paul Island, Bering Sea, Alaska
Article
Full-text available
Current anthropogenic global change, including the direct alteration of landscapes and rapid shifts in climate, is having deleterious impacts on existing aquatic resources but is also giving rise to new water bodies. This is affecting the types, area and distribution of continental waters worldwide, and altering global biogeochemical cycles. In add...
Article
Full-text available
Palaeoenvironmental records from the now-submerged Bering Land Bridge (BLB) covering the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the present are needed to document changing environments and connections with the dispersal of humans into North America. Moreover, terrestrially based records of environmental changes are needed in close proximity to the re-establ...
Article
Lake sediments constitute natural archives of past environmental changes. Historically, research has focused mainly on generating regional climate records, but records of human impacts caused by land use and exploitation of freshwater resources are now attracting scientific and management interests. Long-term environmental records are useful to est...
Article
Full-text available
Lake sediments constitute natural archives of past environmental changes. Historically, research has focused mainly on generating regional climate records, but records of human impacts caused by land use and exploitation of freshwater resources are now attracting scientific and management interests. Long-term environmental records are useful to est...
Presentation
Sedimentary diatoms have been used to quantitatively reconstruct diverse limnological variables, including temperature. Even though the temperature is often less of a key driver of diatom ecology than other environmental parameters, inference models based on diatom assemblage composition have been shown to be reliable proxies for water temperature....
Article
Full-text available
Lake sediments constitute natural archives of past environmental changes. Historically, research has focussed mainly on generating regional climate records, but records of human impacts caused by land-use and exploitation of freshwater resources are now attracting scientific and management interests. Long-term environmental records are useful to es...
Article
Populations of a centric diatom that produces copious extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), known as ‘lake snow’, have developed in several large microtrophic lakes in New Zealand over the past 10 years. The EPS coats fishing lines and blocks water filters. The phenomenon was first noticed in Lake Wanaka in the early 2000s and has recently been...
Article
Full-text available
Global aquatic ecosystems are under increasing threat from anthropogenic activity, as well as being exposed to past (and projected) climate change, however, the nature of how climate and human impacts are recorded in lake sediments is often ambiguous. Natural and anthropogenic drivers can force a similar response in lake systems, yet the ability to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Over the past 12 years, many rivers in New Zealand’s South Island have been invaded by the stalk-producing diatom Didymosphenia geminata (Lyngbye) M. Schmidt, 1899. The fouling of NZ’s pristine rivers, therefore, exacerbates the recent discovery of a rare phenomenon coined “lake snow” in two of the South Island’s large iconic lakes: Lakes Wanaka an...
Article
Full-text available
Significance St. Paul Island, Alaska, is famous for its late-surviving population of woolly mammoth. The puzzle of mid-Holocene extinction is solved via multiple independent paleoenvironmental proxies that tightly constrain the timing of extinction to 5,600 ± 100 y ago and strongly point to the effects of sea-level rise and drier climates on freshw...
Research
Full-text available
A floating mucous (lake snot) caused by algae has now appeared in three iconic South Island lakes (Wanaka, Coleridge and Wakatipu) and is causing problems with recreation and water supply, particularly in Wanaka.  A team of scientists from the University of Otago, Landcare Research and Université Laval (Canada) have established that the recent app...
Article
Full-text available
Lacustrine sediment accumulation provides meaningful and diverse long-term records of environmental change. This overview highlights the usefulness of the paleolimnological approach in evaluating the magnitude and direction of human-induced environmental change in lakes and their catchments. Because of the services they provide, freshwater ecosyste...
Article
Full-text available
Sediment cores from three lakes located in the northernmost region of Ungava, Québec (Canada) were examined to define aquatic community and ecosystem variability during the Late Holocene period. A chironomid-based transfer function was used to reconstruct August air temperature trends, and lacustrine primary production was inferred from sedimentary...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines environmental change over the post-colonial period at Wainono (South Canterbury, New Zealand), a coastal lagoon and wetland of national and international significance for native birds and fish, currently targeted for restoration. In order to better understand the recent trajectory of this ecosystem, a multi-proxy palaeolimno-log...
Article
Full-text available
African tropical lakes provide vital ecosystem services including food and water to some of the fastest growing human populations, yet they are among the most understudied ecosystems in the world. The consequences of climate change and other stressors on the tropical lakes of Africa have been informed by long-term analyses, but these studies have l...
Data
Redundancy analysis (RDA) used to infer macrophyte abundance in Chenango Lake constrained by total phosphorus (TP) and whole-lake macrophyte biomass (BiomEpiV). The Chenango Lake sediment core sites are plotted passively (i.e. unconstrained by environmental variables; numbers shown give depth of sample in cm in the sediment core) whereas the surfac...
Article
Full-text available
Submerged macrophyte abundance strongly influences aquatic ecosystems. Because of a lack of monitoring data, however, the long-term dynamics of such aquatic plants are poorly understood. Increasingly, paleolimnologists use changes in subfossil algae and invertebrates to infer past submerged macrophyte dynamics and assess how human activities have a...
Article
Full-text available
Small, shallow, temperate lakes are predominant landscape features in North America, however, little is known about their long-term ecosystem dynamics, and few data exist on the chironomid fauna they harbor. Using multivariate analyses, we defined relationships between sub-fossil chironomid assemblage composition and environmental variables in 26 s...
Article
Full-text available
The Great Whale River region on the eastern shore of Hudson Bay, Canada, encompasses the villages of Whapmagoostui (Cree First Nation) and Kuujjuarapik (Inuit) and surrounding areas. The principal field station of Centre d'tudes nordiques (CEN: Centre for Northern Studies) has operated at Whapmagoostui-Kuujjuarapik (W-K; 55° 15′ N, 77° 45′ w) since...
Article
The analysis of sedimentary chironomid assemblages is an approach that has been widely adopted for inferring past environmental conditions. However, there is an ongoing discussion in the literature about whether this approach could become more sensitive at detecting past environmental changes if paleolimnologists conducted finer taxonomic analyses...
Article
Full-text available
To mark the 50th anniversary of the Centre d'études nordiques (CEN: Centre for Northern Studies), this commentary presents a history of CEN over the last 5 decades. We first address the socio-political context at the time that CEN was founded and the development of the centre over the first two decades of its existence, a period of emerging nationa...
Article
To mark the 50(th) anniversary of the Centre d'etudes nordiques (CEN: Centre for Northern Studies), this commentary presents a history of CEN over the last 5 decades. We first address the socio-political context at the time that CEN was founded and the development of the centre over the first two decades of its existence, a period of emerging natio...
Article
Full-text available
Summary1. Pacific salmon are a textbook example of migratory animals that transfer nutrients between ecosystems, but little is known about how salmon-derived nutrients (SDN) affect the biodiversity of recipient freshwater ecosystems. We examined paleolimnological records from six Alaskan lakes to define how changes in SDN from sockeye salmon (Oncor...
Data
210Pb chronology from three unpublished alpine lakes included in this study. Lakes are detailed in Table 1. All three age models met our criteria for inclusion in the study, yielding reliable dates through the unsupported 210Pb section of the core. Constant sedimentation rates near the limit of 210Pb dating are shown by the linear relationships of...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Although arctic lakes have responded sensitively to 20(th)-century climate change, it remains uncertain how these ecological transformations compare with alpine and montane-boreal counterparts over the same interval. Furthermore, it is unclear to what degree other forcings, including atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic reactive nit...
Article
Sediment cores spanning the postglacial period were recovered from two coastal freshwater basins located 300 km apart in northernmost Ungava (Nunavik, Canada). A basal date from the sequence recovered near Wakeham Bay suggests that the region was ice-free by as early as 9600 cal. a BP. The initial development of both investigated lacustrine ecosyst...
Article
The absence of datable macrofossils in six sediment cores recovered from northern Ungava (Canada) lakes constituted a major challenge for the establishment of reliable lacustrine chronologies for the Holocene. Consequently, AMS radiocarbon dating of humic acids was used to assess age–depth in the cores. The reliability of the radiocarbon results ne...
Article
Full-text available
The isotope composition (δ18O and δD) of surface waters was measured over a 26-month period near three localities situated along the northern coast of Ungava Peninsula, Quebec, Canada. To characterize the present-day local hydrological settings, the oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios were measured from precipitation and were compared to local and r...
Article
Full-text available
Fifty-five paleolimnological records from lakes in the circumpolar Arctic reveal widespread species changes and ecological reorganizations in algae and invertebrate communities since approximately anno Domini 1850. The remoteness of these sites, coupled with the ecological characteristics of taxa involved, indicate that changes are primarily driven...
Conference Paper
In the last decade, paleolimnological studies have shown that lacustrine ecosystems in many arctic regions are presently experiencing noticeable changes, likely brought about by recent, in part human-induced, climatic warming. Lakes are a major component of northern landscapes and their sensitivity to variations in their catchments make them reliab...
Article
Full-text available
Two diatom-based transfer functions for the reconstruction of past levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and water colour were applied to fossil diatom species assemblages from a coastal isolation basin on the eastern shore of Hudson Bay. Diatom stratigraphic changes and the diatom-inferred patterns of limnological change following the retreat o...
Article
Early Holocene sediments from a continental Antarctic lake (Ace Lake, Vestfold Hills, East Antarctica) contained abundant fossil rotifers of the genus Notholca. The fossil is similar to specimens of Notholca sp. present in modern-day Ace Lake and other fresh and brackish lakes of the Vestfold Hills. Cyanobacteria and protists (chrysophyte cysts, di...
Article
Full-text available
Résumé En vue de retracer les phases d'isolation postglaciaire d'un lac côtier situé près de Kuujjuaraapik-Whapmagoostui (baie d'Hudson), le contenu diatomifère d'une carotte de sédiments a été analysé. La séquence sédimentaire recueillie dans le lac Kachishayoot démontre trois unités de changements paléoenvironnementaux provoqués par le relèvement...
Article
Full-text available
Postglacial isolation of a coastal basin near Kuujjuaraapik-Whapmagoostui, Hudsonie: A diatom biostratigraphical investigation. In order to retrace the successive postglacial isolation phases of a coastal lake located near Kuujjuaraapik-Whapmagoostui (eastern Hudson Say), the diatom assemblages of a sediment core were analysed. The sedimentary sequ...
Thesis
Thèse (de baccalauréat) -- Université Laval, 1998. Bibliogr.: f. 43-45.

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Projects

Projects (12)
Project
This project is the first to address specifically the ostracod fauna of the Sept-îles region. The first research objective of this project is to characterize the intertidal ostracod fauna in this region. The second objective is to determine the environmental factors explaining the distribution and abundance of ostracods in the study region to determine the usefulness of this benthic micro-crustacean group as a bioindicator of environmental change. The knowledge acquired will allow this bioindicator group to be integrated into spatial and temporal analyses of environmental dynamics for this region of Quebec, including the natural variability and effects from anthropogenic disturbances of the Côte-Nord ecosystem.
Project
Through the approach of collaboration and convergence, this project aims to pool the knowledge gained since the creation of the Quebec Maritime Network in 2016 and to bridge the gap between disciplines in order to answer some of the important questions of public interest concerning the Saint-Laurence System evolution.
Project
To better understand the structure and function of the coastal ecosystems of Québec's North Shore. To evaluate the impacts of human activities (port, industrial, maritime) and climate change on these coastal ecosystems.