Emilia Hofman-Kamińska

Emilia Hofman-Kamińska
Polish Academy of Sciences | PAN · Mammal Research Institute

PhD

About

28
Publications
11,702
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Introduction
My research concerns the foraging ecology and palaeoecology of large herbivorous mammals from the late Pleistocene to the present day. I studied the changes in habitat use and diet of European bison, aurochs and moose in Central and Eastern Europe during the Holocene. I used stable C and N isotopes, 3D DMTA and radiocarbon dating. Currently, I am leading a research project aimed at studying the habitat use and diet of steppe bison in the gradient of the late Pleistocene plant zones in Eurasia.
Additional affiliations
October 2011 - March 2021
Polish Academy of Sciences
Position
  • PhD

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Years of studies have already highlighted the complex combination, in moose feeding ecology, of a marked selectivity coupled with a significant dietary adaptability toward changes in the local resource availability. Dental textures resulting from masticatory movements and the properties of ingested food items constitute a link between the animal, i...
Conference Paper
Isotopic tracking of diet and habitat of European bison, Moose, and Aurochs since 12,000 years in Europe.
Article
A recent study of mammoth subfossil remains has demonstrated the potential of using relatively low-coverage high-throughput DNA sequencing to genetically sex specimens, revealing a strong male-biased sex ratio [P. Pečnerová et al., Curr. Biol. 27, 3505–3510.e3 (2017)]. Similar patterns were predicted for steppe bison, based on their analogous femal...
Article
Full-text available
The cave bear (Ursus spelaeus) is one of the Late Pleistocene megafauna species that faced extinction at the end of the last ice age. Although it is represented by one of the largest fossil records in Europe and has been subject to several interdisciplinary studies including palaeogenetic research, its fate remains highly controversial. Here, we us...
Article
Full-text available
Climate warming and human landscape transformation during the Holocene resulted in environmental changes for wild animals. The last remnants of the European Pleistocene megafauna that survived into the Holocene were particularly vulnerable to changes in habitat. To track the response of habitat use and foraging of large her-bivores to natural and a...
Preprint
Full-text available
European bison ( Bison bonasus ) are the largest endemic vertebrates in Europe, and one of the few megafaunal species to have survived the mass megafaunal extinction during the Pleistocene/Holocene transition (12-9 thousand years ago). Untangling their evolutionary history would provide valuable information about the response of European megafauna...
Article
Environmental changes related to forest expansion and later to agricultural development and deforestation during the Holocene in Europe have strongly shaped herbivore distribution and habitat selection, leading to species extinction. In this paper, we examine, through dental microwear textural analysis, the foraging habitats, dietary flexibility an...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated how do environmental and climatic factors, but also management, affect the carbon (δ¹³C) and nitrogen (δ¹⁵N) stable isotope composition in bone collagen of the two largest contemporary herbivores: European bison (Bison bonasus) and moose (Alces alces) across Europe. We also analysed how different scenarios of population recovery- re...
Data
Values of carbon δ13Ccoll and nitrogen δ15N measured in collagen of modern European bison Bison bonasus and moose Alces alces populations, characteristics of environmental conditions (altitude, mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature) in analysed populations and farmland utilization by bison. Data on presence/absence (1-yes, 0-no) of far...
Article
Full-text available
Żubr jest ostatnim przedstawicielem legendarnej megafauny zamieszkującej plejstoceńską Europę. Jego masa ciała może przekraczać nawet 900 kg, co czyni go największym lądowym zwierzęciem naszego kontynentu, znacznie większym niż kolejne pod względem masy ciała łosie czy piżmowoły. Jakie czynniki sprawiły, że żubr przetrwał do czasów obecnych, a jego...
Article
Full-text available
The two living species of bison (European and American) are among the few terrestrial megafauna to have survived the late Pleistocene extinctions. Despite the extensive bovid fossil record in Eurasia, the evolutionary history of the European bison (or wisent, Bison bonasus) before the Holocene (o11.7 thousand years ago (kya)) remains a mystery. We...
Data
Supplementary Figures 1-27, Supplementary Tables 1-11, Supplementary Notes 1-4 and Supplementary References
Article
We investigated the dietary differences among four extant suid genera using 3D dental microwear texture analysis on the enamel surfaces of molar shearing facets. We tested the differences among four taxa for four variables: complexity, anisotropy, and heterogeneity at two scales. This enabled us to distinguish omnivorous taxa (Sus scrofa and Potamo...
Article
Full-text available
According to the refugee species concept, increasing replacement of open steppe by forest cover after the last glacial period and human pressure had together forced European bison (Bison bonasus)—the largest extant terrestrial mammal of Europe—into forests as a refuge habitat. The consequent decreased fitness and population density led to the gradu...
Article
Full-text available
The European bison is the largest terrestrial mammal in Europe. After extinction in the wild at the beginning of the twentieth century, it was re-introduced to Białowieża Forest and other woodlands in Eastern Europe. In this paper, we analysed the movements of European bison beyond the continuous woodlands of the Białowieża Forest (NE Poland) betwe...
Article
Full-text available
European bison, the largest mammal in Europe, after being exterminated in the wild and then restored during the 20th century is still listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN Red List of Threatened Species) as a species vulnerable to extinction. However, the increasing number of European bison, through creation of new and...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The main questions asked during the project are as follows: 1. Was the foraging ecology of steppe bison reflecting the structure of the vegetation cover in the areas of its occurrence in different climatic and environmental conditions? 2. Was the steppe bison a species with a narrow spectrum of diet and habitat use, making it less adapted to dramatic climate and environmental changes during the Late Pleistocene and Pleistocene/Holocene transition? 3. Does the stability of open tundra-steppe environments in the Late Pleistocene in northeastern Siberia contributed to much later than in Europe extinction of steppe bison in this area?