Emanuela Di Martino

Emanuela Di Martino
University of Oslo · Natural History Museum

PhD in Earth Sciences

About

95
Publications
19,054
Reads
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752
Citations
Citations since 2016
75 Research Items
652 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - present
University of Oslo
Position
  • Researcher
November 2015 - November 2018
Natural History Museum, London
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2015 - November 2015
University of Oslo
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
July 2010 - February 2014
Utrecht University
Field of study
  • Geosciences
October 2006 - December 2008
University of Catania
Field of study
  • Geology

Publications

Publications (95)
Preprint
Full-text available
Bryozoans are becoming an increasingly popular study system in macroevolutionary, ecological, and paleobiological research. Members of this colonial invertebrate phylum are notable for displaying an exceptional degree of division of labor in the form of specialized modules (polymorphs), which allow for the inference of individual allocation of reso...
Chapter
Full-text available
Hotspots of tropical marine biodiversity are areas that harbour disproportionately large numbers of species compared to surrounding regions. The richness and location of these hotspots have changed throughout the Cenozoic. Here, we review the global dynamics of Cenozoic tropical marine biodiversity hotspots, including the four major hotspots of the...
Article
In 1878, Arthur Waters described a bryozoan fauna from a Pleistocene (Calabrian) outcrop, at that time considered as Pliocene, located near the town of Brucoli in southeast Sicily (Italy). Waters' work on bryozoans was based on the material collected four years earlier by Theodor Fuchs, curator of the Imperial-Royal Mineralogical Court-Cabinet in V...
Article
Full-text available
Allometry is vital for understanding the mechanisms underlying phenotypic evolution. Despite a large body of literature on allometry, studies based on fossil time‐series are limited for solitary organisms and non‐existent for colonial organisms. Allometric relationships have been found to be relatively constant across Recent populations of the same...
Article
Full-text available
Since its first appearance in the early Miocene, the cheilostome bryozoan genus Microporella has been cosmopolitan, recorded from most continents. However, Miocene Microporella records in New Zealand are scarce, and currently limited to a single middle Miocene species identified as Microporella hyadesi (a Recent bifoliate erect form originally desc...
Article
The zoological dry collection of the Swedish Museum of Natural History in Stockholm includes an important, historical bryozoan section that is rich in species and specimens and also diverse from a geographical point of view. This collection also contains the type specimens of the type species of some cheilostome bryozoan genera introduced by severa...
Article
Full-text available
Phylogenetic relationships and the timing of evolutionary events are essential for understanding evolution on longer time scales. Cheilostome bryozoans are a group of ubiquitous, species-rich, marine colonial organisms with an excellent fossil record but lack phylogenetic relationships inferred from molecular data. We present genome-skimmed data fo...
Article
Full-text available
Plastic debris provides long-lasting substrates for benthic organisms, thus acting as a potential vector for their dispersion. Its interaction with these colonizers is, however, still poorly known. This study examines fouling communities on beached, buoyant and benthic plastic debris in the Catalan Sea (NW Mediterranean), and characterizes the plas...
Article
Full-text available
Bryozoans are common and diverse in fossil and modern coral reefs. However, studies of bryozoans in ancient reefs are generally limited, and even less is known about fossil bryozoan faunas associated with coral reefs in the Caribbean region. This is the second contribution describing the bryozoan assemblage from the early Miocene (Aquitanian) reefs...
Article
Examining the supposition that local-scale competition drives macroevolutionary patterns has become a familiar goal in fossil biodiversity studies. However, it is an elusive goal, hampered by inadequate confirmation of ecological equivalence and interactive processes between clades, patchy sampling, few comparative analyses of local species assembl...
Article
Full-text available
The Mediterranean specimens of the genus Microporella collected from shallow water habitats during several surveys and cruises undertaken mostly off the Italian coast are revised. As a result of the disentanglement of the M. ciliata complex and the examination of new material, three new species, M. bicollaris sp. nov., M. ichnusae sp. nov., and M....
Article
Full-text available
Larger molecular phylogenies based on ever more genes are becoming commonplace with the advent of cheaper and more streamlined sequencing and bioinformatics pipelines. However, many groups of inconspicuous but no less evolutionarily or ecologically important marine invertebrates are still neglected in the quest for understanding species- and higher...
Article
Full-text available
Among life history traits, offspring size has one of the most direct impacts on fitness, influencing growth, recruitment and survival of the individual, therefore affecting population, and ultimately macroevolutionary outcomes. Despite its ecological and evolutionary importance, little is known about how offspring size varies in lineages over macro...
Article
This is the first of two comprehensive taxonomic works on the early Miocene (ca. 23–20 Ma) bryozoan fauna associated with coral reefs from the Siamaná Formation, in the remote region of Cocinetas Basin in the La Guajira Peninsula, northern Colombia, southern Caribbean. Fifteen bryozoan species in 11 families are described, comprising two cyclostome...
Article
Full-text available
Cribrilinid bryozoans originating from Pleistocene deep-water sediments from two localities near Messina (Sicily, Italy)—Capo Milazzo (Gelasian) and Scoppo (Calabrian)—were examined. Five cribrilinid species were found, three in each locality and time interval, with only one species shared. Three species, Cribrilaria profunda n. sp., Glabrilaria tr...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term patterns of phenotypic change are the cumulative results of tens of thousands to millions of years of evolution. Yet, empirical and theoretical studies of phenotypic selection are largely based on contemporary populations. The challenges in studying phenotypic evolution, in particular trait-fitness associations in the deep past, are barri...
Article
Full-text available
Resolution of relationships at lower taxonomic levels is crucial for answering many evolutionary questions, and as such, sufficiently varied species representation is vital. This latter goal is not always achievable with relatively fresh samples. To alleviate the difficulties in procuring rarer taxa, we have seen increasing utilization of historica...
Preprint
Full-text available
Larger molecular phylogenies based on ever more genes are becoming commonplace with the advent of cheaper and more streamlined sequencing and bioinformatics pipelines. However, many groups of inconspicuous but no less evolutionarily or ecologically important marine invertebrates are still neglected in the quest for understanding species-and higher-...
Article
Full-text available
Investigation of bryozoan faunas collected in two submarine caves in Lesvos Island, Aegean Sea revealed a great number of colonies of three species currently assigned to the cheilostome family Onychocellidae: Onychocella marioni Jullien, 1882, O. vibraculifera Neviani, 1895, and Smittipora disjuncta Canu & Bassler, 1930. All species were first desc...
Article
The status of Conopeum Gray, 1848 in New Zealand is clarified, confirming the presence of three living species – one a naturalised alien, one new to science, and a third that is also known in the Pleistocene. Conopeum seurati (Canu, 1928), a Mediterranean-European species, is naturalised at three localities in New Zealand – Opua, Whangarei Harbour...
Preprint
Disputing the supposition that ecological competition drives macroevolutionary patterns is now a familiar goal in many fossil biodiversity studies. But it is an elusive goal, hampered by patchy sampling, few assemblage-level comparative analyses, unverified ecological equivalence of clades and a dearth of appropriate statistical tools. We address t...
Article
Full-text available
Microporella Hincks, 1877 is one of the most diverse genera of cheilostome bryozoans, containing more than 150 named species. Distributed globally since the early Miocene, the majority of species of Microporella have sheet-like colonies encrusting hard and / or ephemeral substrates, while a limited number of species have erect bifoliate colonies st...
Article
Full-text available
Bryozoans offer one of the few systems in which competitive interactions for living space can be studied in the fossil record. Here, we describe the outcome of competitive overgrowths in a 3-million-year-old bryozoan palaeocommunity encrusting shells of the bivalve Anomia simplex from the lower Tamiami Formation in Florida (upper Pliocene, Piacenzi...
Data
All datasets necessary to reproduce the analyses in "Sneaking up on ‘enemies’: alleviating inherent disadvantages in competitive outcomes in a nearly 3‐million‐year‐old palaeocommunity from Florida, USA"
Preprint
Full-text available
Resolution of relationships at lower taxonomic levels is crucial for answering many evolutionary questions, and as such, sufficiently varied species representation is vital. This latter goal is not always achievable with relatively fresh samples. To alleviate the difficulties in procuring rarer taxa, we have seen increasing utilization of historica...
Article
The genus Setosella included to date six species. After revision, only four of these species were retained, i.e. S. vulnerata, S. cavernicola, S. folini and S. spiralis. The remaining two species were tentatively placed in Woodipora, W.? antilleana n. comb., and Andreella, A.? fragilis n. comb. On the other hand, scanning electron microscopy examin...
Article
Full-text available
Is speciation generally a ‘special time’ in morphological evolution or are lineage splitting events just ‘more of the same’ where the end product happens to be two separate lineages? Data on evolutionary dynamics during anagenetic and cladogenetic events among closely related lineages within a clade are rare, but the fossil record of the bryozoan g...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Understanding the phylogenetic relationships among species is one of the main goals of systematic biology. Simultaneously, credible phylogenetic hypotheses are often the first requirement for unveiling the evolutionary history of traits and for modelling macroevolutionary processes. However, many non-model taxa have not yet been sequen...
Article
Pseudidmonea is a poorly known cyclostome genus, initially recorded from the Recent of the Subantarctic and Antarctic but subsequently found in the middle Miocene of Indonesia. Two new fossil species of Pseudidmonea, P. oretiensis and P. debodeae, are described here from the early Miocene, bryozoan-rich Forest Hill Limestone of Southland, New Zeala...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the publication of several taxonomic studies during the last few years, our knowledge of bryozoans from the diversity hotspot of the Indo-West Pacific remains seriously deficient. Here we describe 11 bryozoan species, comprising two anascan- and nine ascophoran-grade cheilostomes, from the middle Miocene (Langhian–Serravallian) of Sedan in...
Article
Full-text available
Commercial mining northeast of Sarasota, SW Florida (USA), since the 1960s has exposed Plio-Pleistocene marine shell beds of the Tamiami Formation, a complex sequence of mixed carbonate and siliciclastic beds containing a malacofauna that is a mixture of subtropical and temperate species. Material used for the current study consists of shells of th...
Article
Full-text available
Inter‐ and intraspecific competition are usually observed over a few generations but their patterns and consequences are seldom tractable in natural systems over longer timescales relevant to macroevolutionary change. Here, we use win‐draw‐lose competitive overgrowths for a marine benthic community of encrusting bryozoans that have evolved together...
Article
Full-text available
Bryozoans are among the most common macrofossils in the Late Cretaceous Chalk. They include many species that encrusted hard substrates, notably echinoid tests, forming habitat islands on the Chalk seabed. The growth strategies adopted by these bryozoans, as well as the occurrence of reparative structures, provides evidence of the conditions experi...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes 40 bryozoan species, comprising one cyclostome and 39 cheilostomes (8 anascan- and 31 ascophoran-grade), obtained from early Pleistocene and Holocene samples from two localities in Indonesia. Five of thecheilostomes are described as new species: Acanthodesia variegata n. sp., Pleurocodonellina javanensis n. sp., Calyptotheca si...
Article
In 1922, the first taxonomic work on Maastrichtian bryozoans from Madagascar was published in the Annales de Paléontologie by Ferdinand Canu. Canu described 25 species, 17 of which were regarded as new but the material has never been revised until now. Here we employ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to illustrate Canu's material and revise the ta...
Article
Full-text available
Marine biodiversity in the Coral Triangle is several times higher than anywhere else, but why this is true is unknown because of poor historical data. To address this, we compared the first available record of fossil cheilostome bryozoans from Indonesia with the previously sampled excellent record from the Caribbean. These two regions differ severa...
Article
The Ariyalur Group of Tamil Nadu and Pondicherry in southern India contains a rich bryozoan fauna of 100 species, including an unusual cheilostome from the Upper Campanian or Lower Maastrichtian Kallankurichchi Formation originally identified as Macropora ? sp. If the generic attribution were to be correct for this bryozoan, it would considerably a...
Article
Full-text available
In 1949 Michel Vigneaux published an important taxonomic work on fossil bryozoans that introduced numerous new taxa at family-, genus- and species-levels, the majority of which are still used today, in some cases for extant bryozoans. However, Vigneaux’s material from the Miocene of the Aquitaine Basin in France has never been revised. Here we empl...
Article
Full-text available
Three new fossil bryozoan species, a ctenostome and two cheilostomes, are described and figured from Pleistocene strata of the Wanganui Basin, New Zealand. Buskia waiinuensis sp. nov., a soft-body ctenostome preserved as a mould bioimmuration, is the first fossil record of the genus from New Zealand. Microporella rusti sp. nov., which is notable fo...
Article
Competition is an important biotic interaction that influences survival and reproduction. While competition on ecological timescales has received great attention, little is known about competition on evolutionary timescales. Do competitive abilities change over hundreds of thousands to millions of years? Can we predict competitive outcomes using ph...
Article
The bryozoan genus Heteractis is known from three, possibly four, different geographical regions and times. Gabb & Horn (1862) introduced the genus Heteractis for Lunulites duclosii Lea, 1833, from the middle Eocene of southeast USA. Di Martino et al. (2017) in this journal recently described a new species of lunulitiform bryozoan, Heteractis tanza...
Article
Records of Cenozoic tropical bryozoan faunas are sparse, particularly from Africa. Here we describe a previously unknown bryozoan ‘sand fauna’ from a drill core across the Eocene–Oligocene boundary from a hemipelagic clay succession in Tanzania. Although low in diversity, this well-preserved fauna includes four cheilostome species, all new to scien...
Article
Full-text available
The first comprehensive study of the bryozoan fauna from the upper lower Miocene (Burdigalian) Chipola Formation was produced in 1968 by Reginald J. Scolaro in his Ph.D. dissertation but, unfortunately, has never been published. In the present work, based on museum as well as newly collected material, we review and revise the taxonomy of the Chipol...
Conference Paper
A benthic community of encrusting organisms has lived and evolved side-by-side in coastal New Zealand over more than two million years. Everyday for the two million years, colonies of cheilostome bryozoans fought for space, without which they can neither feed nor reproduce. Because space is such a crucial resource for encrusting organisms, competit...
Conference Paper
The Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA) is the global centre of tropical marine biodiversity where species richness of most major animal taxa is several times higher than anywhere else. However, when and why this difference arose is unknown. We have addressed this question using extensive new and museum collections of fossil cheilostomes from the IAA...
Article
Numerous non-indigenous bryozoan species or NIBs (= non-indigenous bryozoans) have been recorded in the Mediterranean Sea, some in marine cave habitats. Recent surveys, mostly of submarine caves, led to the discovery of new NIBs and documented the spreading of NIBs already known from the basin. Cradoscrupocellaria hirsuta, Catenicella paradoxa, and...