Elodie-Laure Jimenez

Elodie-Laure Jimenez
Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences · Direction Earth and History of Life

Post-doc
"Invention, it must be humbly admitted, does not consist in creating out of void, but out of chaos." Mary Shelley

About

24
Publications
6,980
Reads
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140
Citations
Citations since 2016
19 Research Items
138 Citations
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Introduction
My research focuses on the palaeoecology of NW Europe during the Pleistocene. I am particularly interested in predator-prey relationships, hyaena behaviors, and seasonality of the key-species.
Additional affiliations
July 2020 - January 2021
Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Brain.be-funded ICHIE project (Interconnectivity of large Carnivores, Humans and Ice Age Environments)
March 2019 - July 2020
University of Aberdeen
Position
  • Researcher
May 2018 - November 2018
University of Aberdeen
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Leverhulme-funded PleistoHERD project.
Education
October 2012 - December 2017
Université Libre de Bruxelles
Field of study
  • Archaeology
September 2009 - September 2011
Université Bordeaux Sciences & Technologies
Field of study
  • Bio-Geosciences

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
Grey wolves (Canis lupus) are one of the few large terrestrial carnivores that have maintained a wide geographic distribution across the Northern Hemisphere throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene. Recent genetic studies have suggested that, despite this continuous presence, major demographic changes occurred in wolf populations between the late Pl...
Article
Megacarnivore behaviours shape ecological dynamics between their prey and competitors and therefore play a key role in structuring ecosystems. In Late Pleistocene Eurasia, hominins and hyenas were sympatric predators. Since the first discoveries of Crocuta c. spelaea in the 19th century, this ‘bone-crushing’ species has been identified at most Pala...
Chapter
Seasonal organization of subsistence activities has long been recognized as a key question in studying hunter-gatherer societies, including in Palaeolithic archaeology (Chapter 17). Gathering seasonal data on archaeological sites from a given region allows us to grasp the complex spatiotemporal strategies that human groups adopted to overcome fluct...
Article
The exploitation of mid-and large-sized herbivores (ungulates) was central to hominin subsistence across Late Pleistocene Europe. Reconstructing the paleoecology of prey-taxa is key to better understanding procurement strategies, decisions and behaviors, and the isotope analysis of faunal bones and teeth found at archaeological sites represent a po...
Article
Full-text available
Background Ancient DNA studies suggest that Late Pleistocene climatic changes had a significant effect on population dynamics in Arctic species. The Eurasian collared lemming ( Dicrostonyx torquatus ) is a keystone species in the Arctic ecosystem. Earlier studies have indicated that past climatic fluctuations were important drivers of past populati...
Chapter
Tooth enamel and dentin are the most studied hard tissues used to explore hominin evolution, life history, diet, health, and culture. Surprisingly, cementum (the interface between the alveolar bone and the root dentin) remains the least studied dental tissue even though its unique growth, which is continuous throughout life, has been acknowledged s...
Article
The exploitation of mid- and large-sized herbivores (ungulates) was central to hominin subsistence across Late Pleistocene Europe. Reconstructing the paleoecology of prey-taxa is key to better understanding procurement strategies, decisions and behaviors, and the isotope analysis of faunal bones and teeth found at archaeological sites represent a p...
Chapter
Full-text available
Most researchers accept that by the end of the Pleistocene dogs were part of the daily life of prehistoric hunter-gatherers. Recent analyses of the mammal assemblages from the third cave of Goyet (Belgium) reveal that a large component of the material from bone level A1 postdates the Last Glacial Maximum. The biometric study of the large canid rema...
Article
Full-text available
Grey wolves (Canis lupus) are one of the few large terrestrial carnivores that have maintained a wide geographical distribution across the Northern Hemisphere throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene. Recent genetic studies have suggested that, despite this continuous presence, major demographic changes occurred in wolf populations between the Late...
Article
Full-text available
Předmostí is one of the most famous Gravettian sites in Central Europe. Its fame is based on a unique human assemblage, sadly largely destroyed during the Second World War, a huge mammoth assemblage and a very rich large canid assemblage. It has been shown previously that mammoth played an important role in the subsistence practices of the Gravetti...
Article
Full-text available
Předmostí is one of the most famous Gravettian sites in Central Europe. Its fame is based on a unique human assemblage, sadly largely destroyed during the Second World War, a huge mammoth assemblage and a very rich large canid assemblage. It has been shown previously that mammoth played an important role in the subsistence practices of the Gravetti...
Presentation
Full-text available
Despite some strong fluctuating environmental and ecological pressures between the MIS 5 and 3, human Palaeolithic groups, just like a large amount of other great predators, cohabited in northwestern Europe. They lived sympatrically; particularly in karstic regions like southern England and the Meuse valley in southern Belgium. Already considered a...
Article
Full-text available
Discovered during the 19th century and excavated several times thereafter, Trou Magrite is prob- ably one of the most famous palaeolithic sites in Belgium. The present study was led as part of two doctoral projects in zooarchaeology and archaeology of fire. In this paper our aim is first, to present the results of our historiographical investigatio...
Article
Four isolated canid skulls from four sites (Badyarikha River, Tirekhtyakh River, Ulakhan Sular, Malyi Lyakhovsky Island) in the Sakha Republic of northern Siberia are here described. Three specimens date from the Pleistocene and range in age from more than 50,000 years to about 17,200 years old, the fourth specimen is about 950 years old. The Yakut...
Article
Full-text available
Palaeoecological reconstructions are fundamental for the understanding of interactions between all the mammalian communities in a given environment and their choices in terms of habitat, diet and migrations. During the Late Pleistocene in north western Europe, hyenas and human groups shared essentially the same ecological niche. A comparison of the...
Article
Full-text available
Studies have shown that bones buried in sediments beneath hearths can be indirectly impacted by thermal induction. In a way, these indirectly thermo-altered bones only constitute “collateral damage” and can thus distort the interpretation of burned bone assemblages. Consequently, it is important to be able to distinguish these bones from bones burn...
Research
Full-text available
Improving Resolution In Dental Cementum Analyses Applied To Archaeological Contexts: The CemeNTAA Project
Presentation
Full-text available
Man vs Wild : Ecological pressures and Human behaviours in North-West Europe during the Late Pleistocene (MIS 3). A sustainable ecosystem is a complex and fragile set of interactions and interdependent relationships between living organisms and their physical environments. To be relevant, both archaeological and palaeontological registers must be s...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am looking for any pictures or drawings of perinatal hyena limb bones, so if anyone have some references, let me know, thank you in advance.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Over the last 120,000 years, Europe has gone through a period of climatic instability with an alternation of cold, dry phases with milder, more humid phases. The climatic fluctuations of the Last Ice Age greatly affected the environment and impacted both plant and animal communities. Humans (Neanderthals and Anatomically Modern Humans) competed with the large predators for food and habitat. Until about 40,000 years ago, Neanderthal populations lived in the karst region of eastern Belgium. During this period or shortly afterwards, the first Homo sapiens settled in Belgium. It is also during this period that the cave hyena and the cave bear became extinct, and the cave lion disappeared, while a symbiotic interaction between humans and Pleistocene wolves began to develop. Many predators and herbivores became extinct perhaps due to a combination of the climate changes that were taking place at the time and an increasing human activity. The analyses of the zooarchaeological and taphonomic data of the fossil predators and their prey provide insight into the behaviours of the predators just before their disappearance and elucidate the dynamic relationship between the predators and humans in the context of a deteriorating climate. Important questions in this regard are whether Anatomically Modern Humans adapted to the changing environment in a different way than the last Belgian Neanderthals? Did their expansion affect the demographics of the large carnivores? Did Palaeolithic dogs help Modern Humans control predator populations? Did the herbivore demographics suffer from human hunting pressure? Did the predators (humans and/or carnivores) adapt to the declining populations of their prey by expanding their habitat, so that they hunted not only in the karst area of eastern Belgium, but also in the lowlands? To answer these important questions, the ICHIE project focuses on the study of zooarchaeological and taphonomic data of the fossil material from Belgian prehistoric and paleontological sites and on the stable isotope analyses from a selection of this material. The analyses of the new material from the Belgian karst area (Goyet, Trou Magrite, Caverne Marie-Jeanne) and the lowland area (Zemst, Hofstade) will be integrated with already published analyses of human and animal remains from Belgium and European sites. This research is funded by the BRAIN.BE 2.0 ICHIE project from the Belgian Science Policy. The ICHIE project is a partnership between the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences and the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage.
Archived project
W. Renud (PACEA CNRS, Bordeaux) and L. Gourichon (CEPAM, CNRS, Nice) dir. The project CemeNTAA aims to develop and improve a high resolution method for the study of seasonality in prehistoric contexts based on the analysis of animal dental cementum. To override the methodological obstacles cementochronologists have faced until now we proposed to reassess the several protocols classically applied for cementochronology through the establishment of 1) a renew documentation of the biological phenomena and 2) a multi-scale approaches to the cementogenesis knowledge.
Project
At the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century, pioneering archaeologists excavated many Palaeolithic sites in Western Europe. Although many of these early digs were conducted by archaeologists who were very competent for their time, the contextual data recorded during these excavations are naturally far from today’s standards: the spatial distribution of the artefacts was rarely recorded and any stratigraphic observation reported at the time is either incomplete, unreliable or totally absent. As contemporary prehistoric research aims more and more towards high-resolution archaeology, these “old” collections logically tend to be disregarded. However, the bone and stone artefacts amassed by early archaeologists constitute massive collections which, numerically speaking, represent a major part of Europe’s museum collections. The goal of our project is to explore new ways of looking at these “old” collections: what type of data can be extracted from them? What type of questions can they help to resolve? More specifically, our research focuses on faunal collections from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences (RBINS). Similarly to the South-West of France, Belgium constituted one of Europe’s “hot-spots” in terms of archaeological digs at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century. The growing interest in prehistoric ages spurred numerous excavations, particularly in the caves situated along the Mosan Basin which were systematically explored by archaeologists such as E. Dupont. As a result. many of the richest, most important Palaeolithic sites of the region were discovered during this period. A major part of the archaeological material collected during this era, especially from the excavations led by Dupont, are preserved at the RBINS. The lithic artefacts from these “classical” sites have been reviewed many times by modern researchers. But the very abundant faunal assemblages have attracted less attention. In fact, apart from the most spectacular items (bone tools, pierced teeth and portable art), the majority of the faunal remains collected during these early digs are preserved in the palaeontology section of the RBINS, even when they present obvious traces of alteration or use by Man. Our project aims to “dig up” these old, somewhat disregarded faunal collections and try to extract new data from them. Some of the most basic, « traditional » questions about these assemblages may never be answered (exact stratigraphic sequence, defining different occupation phases etc.). But we are convinced that these old digs can give us new insights on hunting strategies, carcass treatment, and paleoecology if we look at them with fresh eyes and new questions. By taking advantage of the abundance of specimens, we will for example look at statistical trends regarding: treatment of carcasses by human and non-human occupants of the caves, faunal spectrums, seasonal data etc. The Trou Magrite (Pont-à-Lesse), which was excavated in the 1860’s by E. Dupont, serves as a “test” case study for this project. The faunal collection from this dig comprises tens of thousands of remains that have never been studied as a whole. Different methodological approaches are being tested on this very large bone assemblage as part of two PhD research programs (Smolderen 2016 ; Jimenez, in preparation). The preliminary results of this first exhaustive analysis will soon be published.