Elmira Mohandesan

Elmira Mohandesan
University of Vienna | UniWien · Department of Evolutionary Anthropology

PhD

About

29
Publications
10,246
Reads
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647
Citations
Citations since 2017
6 Research Items
450 Citations
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Introduction
My research interests mainly cover the topics in population genomics, phylogenetics and animal domestications. I am very fascinated by the field of ancient DNA (aDNA) and the development of new laboratory methods in combinations with next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) that enable us to directly observe the genetic structure of the population and the pattern of genetic changes in the past.

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
New Zealand has the fourth largest feral horse population in the world. The Kaimanawas (KHs) are feral horses descended from various domestic horse breeds released into the Kaimanawa ranges in the 19th and 20th centuries. Over time, the population size has fluctuated dramatically due to hunting, large-scale farming and forestry. Currently, the herd...
Article
Full-text available
Hybrids of horse and donkey, which have been valued in the Mediterranean basin since the Iron Age, became integrated into the animal world north of the Alps in the course of Romanization. Until now, however, their true contribution to the economic and military life in the northern Roman provinces Raetia, Noricum and Upper Pannonia (southern Germany...
Article
Full-text available
Domestication begins with the selection of animals showing less fear of humans. In most domesticates, selection signals for tameness have been superimposed by intensive breeding for economical or other desirable traits. Old World camels, conversely, have maintained high genetic variation and lack secondary bottlenecks associated with breed developm...
Article
Full-text available
The genus Camelus is an interesting model to study adaptive evolution in the mitochondrial genome, as the three extant Old World camel species inhabit hot and low-altitude as well as cold and high-altitude deserts. We sequenced 24 camel mitogenomes and combined them with three previously published sequences to study the role of natural selection un...
Article
Full-text available
The performance of hybridization capture combined with next generation sequencing (NGS) has seen limited investigation with samples from hot and arid regions until now. We applied hybridization capture and shotgun sequencing to recover DNA sequences from bone specimens of ancient-domestic dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) and its extinct ancestor, th...
Article
Full-text available
Significance The dromedary is one of the largest domesticates, sustainably used in arid and hostile environments. It provides food and transport to millions of people in marginal agricultural areas. We show how important long-distance and back-and-forth movements in ancient caravan routes shaped the species’ genetic diversity. Using a global sample...
Article
Full-text available
Dromedaries have been fundamental to the development of human societies in arid landscapes and for long-distance trade across hostile hot terrains for 3,000 y. Today they continue to be an important livestock resource in marginal agro-ecological zones. However, the history of dromedary domestication and the influence of ancient trading networks on...
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Background The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) is a genomic region containing genes with crucial roles in immune responses. MHC class I and class II genes encode antigen-presenting molecules expressed on the cell surface. To counteract the high variability of pathogens, the MHC evolved into a region of considerable heterogeneity in its organ...
Data
Fig. S1 The count of unique 31‐mers that are found n (multiplicity) times in the trimmed and error‐corrected paired‐end reads (blue line). Fig. S2 The count (A) and cumulative proportion (B) of unique 20‐mers that are found n (multiplicity) times in the raw, paired‐end sequencing reads (red line) and the trimmed and error‐corrected paired‐end read...
Article
Full-text available
The single-humped dromedary (Camelus dromedarius), is the most numerous and widespread of domestic camel species and is a significant source of meat, milk, wool, transportation, and sport for millions of people. Dromedaries are particularly well adapted to hot, desert conditions and harbor a variety of biological and physiological characteristics w...
Article
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The technique to produce hybrid Tulu or Nar camels from crosses between dromedary and Bactrian camels is common throughout Middle Eastern and Central Asian countries. Formerly, these hybrids were highly valued as strong and persistent pack animals but today are bred to improve milk or wool quality in the respective species and for camel wrestling....
Article
Full-text available
Rescue excavations recovered a skeleton that resurrect the contemporary dramatic history of Austria in the 17th century as troops besieged Vienna in the second Osmanic-Habsburg war. Unique for Central Europe is the evidence of a completely preserved camel skeleton uncovered in a large refuse pit. The male individual of slender stature indicates a f...
Article
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Population genetic models predict that populations that are geographically close to each other are expected to be genetically more similar to each other compared to those that are widely separate. However the patterns of relationships between geographic distance and molecular divergences at neutral and constrained regions of the genome are unclear....
Article
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a b s t r a c t Cave bears are among the most well known extinct Pleistocene mammals. Their biogeography and taxonomy, along with the factors that led to their extinction, have been subject to long-standing con-troversy. Here, we reconstruct the phylogeography as well as the temporal and spatial population dy-namics of cave bears across their range...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Tuatara are the sister taxon to the Squamata (including lizards and snakes) and are regarded as the most distinctive surviving reptilian genus. They are currently inhabits on offshore islands around New Zealand and have been recognized as a species in need of active conservation management. In this study, we report a total number of five n...
Article
Full-text available
Anuran vocalizations, especially their advertisement calls, are largely species-specific and can be used to identify taxonomic affiliations. Because anurans are not vocal learners, their vocalizations are generally assumed to have a strong genetic component. This suggests that the degree of similarity between advertisement calls may be related to l...
Article
Full-text available
A major challenge for ancient DNA (aDNA) studies using museum specimens is that sampling procedures usually involve at least the partial destruction of each specimen used, such as the removal of skin, pieces of bone, or a tooth. Recently, a nondestructive DNA extraction method was developed for the extraction of amplifiable DNA fragments from museu...
Article
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Article
Ancient DNA research is on the crest of a 'third wave' of progress due to the introduction of a new generation of DNA sequencing technologies. Here we review the advantages and disadvantages of the four new DNA sequencers that are becoming available to researchers. These machines now allow the recovery of orders of magnitude more DNA sequence data,...
Article
Full-text available
The tuatara of New Zealand is a unique reptile that coexisted with dinosaurs and has changed little morphologically from its Cretaceous relatives. Tuatara have very slow metabolic and growth rates, long generation times and slow rates of reproduction. This suggests that the species is likely to exhibit a very slow rate of molecular evolution. Our a...
Article
Full-text available
Research on ancient DNA (aDNA) has the potential to enable molecular biologists and archeologists to decipher certain aspects of history by direct looking into the past. However, several major problems in this field limit the applicability of aDNA studies, most importantly contamination with modern DNA and postmortem DNA degradation. In this study...

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Project (1)
Project
In this project, we use a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the role and contribution of equid hybrids in Roman provinces North of the Alps.