Ellen Pape

Ellen Pape
Ghent University | UGhent · Department of Biology

PhD in Science, Marine Science

About

35
Publications
12,147
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750
Citations

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
Deep seabed mining is potentially imminent in the Clarion Clipperton Fracture Zone (CCFZ; northeast Pacific). Seabed collectors will remove polymetallic nodules and the surrounding surface sediments, both inhabited by meiofauna, along their path. To determine potential impacts of polymetallic nodule removal, we investigated the importance of nodule...
Article
Full-text available
The increasing demand for metals is pushing forward the progress of deep‐sea mining industry. The abyss between the Clarion and Clipperton Fracture Zones (CCFZ), a region holding a higher concentration of minerals than land deposits, is the most targeted area for the exploration of polymetallic nodules worldwide, which may likely disturb the seaflo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Deep seabed mining is imminent in the Clarion Clipperton Fracture Zone (CCFZ; northeast Pacific). Seabed collectors will remove the polymetallic nodules and the surrounding surface sediments, both inhabited by meiobenthos, along their path. To determine potential impacts of polymetallic nodule removal, we investigated the importance of nodule prese...
Article
Full-text available
Polymetallic nodules increase habitat heterogeneity in some abyssal benthic ecosystems by providing hard substrate. Besides their important role in structuring ecosystems, polymetallic nodules have high grades of valuable minerals and are a target of likely future exploitation, particularly in the Pacific Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ). Mining activ...
Article
Full-text available
Macrofauna are an abundant and diverse component of abyssal benthic communities and are likely to be heavily impacted by polymetallic nodule mining in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ). In 2012, the International Seabed Authority (ISA) used available benthic biodiversity data and environmental proxies to establish nine no-mining areas, called Areas...
Article
Erebusssau nom. nov. was originally described by Bussau, (1993) in his PhD thesis “Taxonomische und ökologische Untersuchungen an Nematoden des Peru-Beckens” but the name assigned was already in use, becoming an invalid name. Based on male specimens recovered from the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone, we propose a new replacement nomen for the genu...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, Danovaro et al. [1] prioritized deep-sea essential ecological variables (DEEVs), based on opinions from 112 deep-sea experts worldwide, to support development of a global deep-ocean monitoring and conservation strategy. While a set of universally important DEEVs is necessary to ensure appropriate monitoring, we challenge the conclusion th...
Article
The present investigation focuses on the Global Sea Mineral Resources contract area B4S03 site in the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone nodule fields. We investigated the sedimentary characteristics and the higher-taxon (order/class) and lower-taxon (family, morphospecies) diversity of the soft sediment macrobenthos with special focus on the dominan...
Article
Understanding the effects of bottom-trawling induced changes in benthic community structure, diversity and ecosystem functioning across different benthic-size components is imperative to determine the future sustainability of bottom-trawling fisheries in deep-sea regions. In this study, we combined field sampling observations with a pulse-chase exp...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the effects of bottom-trawling induced changes in benthic community structure, diversity and ecosystem functioning across different benthic-size components is imperative to determine the future sustainability of bottom-trawling fisheries in deep-sea regions. In this study, we combined field sampling observations with a pulse-chase exp...
Article
Full-text available
To be able to adequately assess potential environmental impacts of deep-sea polymetallic nodule mining, the establishment of a proper environmental baseline, incorporating both spatial and temporal variability, is essential. The aim of the present study was to evaluate both spatial and intra-annual variability in meiofauna (higher taxa) and nematod...
Article
Full-text available
Deep-sea areas characterized by the presence of polymetallic nodules are getting increased attention due to their potential commercial and strategic interest for metals such as nickel, copper, and cobalt. The polymetallic nodules occur in areas beyond national jurisdiction, regulated by the International Seabed Authority (ISA). Under exploration co...
Article
Full-text available
Recent years have seen an upsurge in interest in mining in the world’s deep oceans, in areas beyond national jurisdiction. Such mining activity has the potential to cause environmental impacts over large areas. As contractors plan to move from exploration to exploitation activities it is important to develop guidance to ensure that these activities...
Article
Full-text available
The deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) of the Mediterranean (water depth ~3500 m) are some of the most extreme oceanic habitats known. Brines of DHABs are nearly saturated with salt, leading many to suspect they are uninhabitable for eukaryotes. While diverse bacterial and protistan communities are reported from some DHAB haloclines and bri...
Article
Mangroves along the Sudanese Red Sea coast are under constant anthropogenic pressure. To better understand the influence of mangrove clearance on the intertidal benthic community, we investigated the composition, biodiversity and standing stock of the macrofauna communities at high-, mid- and low-water levels in three contrasting habitats: a bare s...
Article
Full-text available
Along a west-to-east axis spanning the Galicia Bank region (Iberian margin) and the Mediterranean basin, a reduction in surface primary productivity and in seafloor flux of particulate organic carbon was mirrored in the in situ organic matter quantity and quality within the underlying deep-sea sediments at different water depths (1200, 1900 and 300...
Article
Full-text available
This study describes a new genus Dystomanema gen. nov. with two new species, D. cadizensis sp. nov. and D. brandtae sp. nov. within the family Ethmolaimidae, subfamily Neotonchinae, based on specimens from two low-Activity cold-seep environments at distant geographical locations. The new genus was first identified in samples from the Darwin mud vol...
Article
Full-text available
Alongside a primary productivity gradient be-tween the Galicia Bank region in the Northeast Atlantic and the more oligotrophic eastern Mediterranean Basin, we in-vestigated the bathymetric (1200–3000 m) and longitudinal variation in several measures for nematode taxon (Shannon– Wiener genus diversity, expected genus richness and generic evenness) a...
Data
Average (SE) relative meiofaunal taxon densities (%) per station. The number of replicate deployments per station can be found in Table 1. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Along a west-to-east axis spanning the Galicia Bank region (Iberian margin) and the Mediterranean basin, a reduction in surface primary productivity and in seafloor flux of particulate organic carbon was mirrored in the in situ organic matter quantity and quality within the underlying deep-sea sediments at different water depths (1200, 1900 and 300...
Article
Full-text available
Alongside a primary productivity gradient between the Galicia Bank region in the northeast Atlantic and the more oligotrophic eastern Mediterranean basin, we investigated the bathymetric (1200–3000 m) and longitudinal variation in several measures for nematode taxon (Shannon–Wiener genus diversity, expected genus richness and generic evenness) and...
Data
During the JC-10 cruise (2007), we sampled the Darwin mud volcano (MV) for meiofaunal community and trophic structure in relation of pore-water geochemistry along a 10 m transect from a seep site on the rim of the crater towards the MV slope. Sediment samples were retrieved by the ROV Isis using push cores. On board and after the pore water extract...
Article
Full-text available
We sampled the Darwin mud volcano (MV) for meiofaunal community and trophic structure in relation to pore-water geochemistry along a 10 m transect from a seep site on the rim of the crater towards the MV slope. Pore-water profiles indicated considerable variation in upward methane (CH4) flow among sediment cores taken along the transect, with highe...
Article
The great variety of geological and hydrological conditions in the deep sea generates many different habitats. Some are only recently explored, although their true extent and geographical coverage are still not fully established. Both continental margins and mid-oceanic seafloors are much more complex ecologically, geologically, chemically and hydr...
Article
Full-text available
The great variety of geological and hydrological conditions in the deep sea generates many different habitats. Some are only recently explored, although their true extent and geographical coverage are still not fully established. Both continental margins and mid-oceanic seafloors are much more complex ecologically, geologically, chemically and hydr...
Article
Full-text available
The great variety of geological and hydrological conditions in the deep sea generates many different habitats. Some are only recently explored, although their true extent and geographical coverage are still not fully established. Both continental margins and mid-oceanic seafloors are much more complex ecologically, geologically, chemically and hydr...
Article
Full-text available
The meiobenthologists' international meetings began officially in Tunisia, in 1969, when 28 researchers gathered to discuss the taxonomy and ecology of meiobenthos. A second meeting followed four years later in York (UK), in 1973, and a third one occurred in Hamburg (Germany) in 1977. From then onwards, the tri-annual International Meiofauna Confer...
Article
Developmental instability (DI) is the sensitivity of a developing trait to random noise and can be measured by degrees of directionally random asymmetry [fluctuating asymmetry (FA)]. FA has been shown to increase with loss of genetic variation and inbreeding as measures of genetic stress, but associations vary among studies. Directional selection a...
Article
Full-text available
The gastropod Terebralia palustris often dominates the surface of muddy to sandy substrates of intertidal mudflats and mangrove forests, where they clearly destabilize the sediment. In the present study, it was investigated whether and to what extent the behaviour of juvenile and adult snails differs among habitats (mudflat vs. mangrove stand) in a...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Dear all,
I have recently decided to switch from Permanova/Primer to R, because the latter is freeware (and I don't know for how long I will still have a license). However, if I cannot seem to resolve my problem (see below), I might just have to go back to using Primer/Permanova.
If I run pairwise permanova/adonis tests on my data, the number of unique permutations is small (I have two groups, each group has 3 observations) and the minimum P value I can get is larger than the alpha value I (and most people) that I use to determine statistical significance (i.e. 0.05). In the manual of the PERMANOVA+ add-on in Primer by Anderson et al. (2008)  it is mentioned (page 28 and onwards) that when the number of unique permutations is small (<100) than one should preferably interpret the Monte-Carlo p value.
Does anyone know how to do this in R?
Thank you very much!
Ellen
Question
Hi all,
I am new to the "field" of deep-sea macrofauna, and I was wondering which books are good to help identify deep-sea macrofauna?
Thanks!
ellen

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
We as Marine Biology Laboratory of Ghent University work as sub-contractors for the Geological Sea Mineral Resources (GSR) of Deme Group for the environmental baseline work necessary and envisioned by the International Seabed Authority (UN) as prerequisite for contractors of the CCFZ nodule fields mining area prior to extraction activities. We work in collaboration with other independent scientists and scientific institutions to carry out an independent biodiversity estimation assessment for sediment meio- and macrofauna, by means of barcoding and molecular techniques, next to taxonomical expertise. We also look into food web structure and trophic dynamics in these sediment size classes. We compare habitats of the CCFZ nodule fields to find patterns that can help identify the best strategies to sustainably extract these mineral resources and protect the functioning of these extreme and largely unknown ecosystems.
Archived project
Evaluation of the recovery rate of nematode communities in tracks after experimental deep-sea disturbance in the deep-sea commercially important fields of manganese nodules (Clarion-Clipperton Zone, Tropical NE Pacific)
Archived project
From the polar waters of the Arctic to the warm seas of the Mediterranean, Europe has almost 90,000 km of coastline. Underneath the waves our seas are home to some of the most spectacular ecosystems on Earth. Ecosystems such as cold-water coral reefs and hydrothermal vents support a huge diversity of life that is both beautiful and alien, but also vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and human activities. The HERMIONE project focused on investigating these and other ecosystems, including submarine canyons, seamounts, cold seeps, open slopes and deep basins. Scientists from a range of disciplines researched their natural dynamics, distribution, and how they interconnect. The scientists also wanted to find out how these ecosystems contribute to the goods and services we rely on, and how they are affected by natural and anthropogenic change. A major aim of HERMIONE was to use the knowledge gained during the project to contribute to EU environmental policies. This information can be used to create effective management plans that will help to protect our oceans for the future. The HERMIONE project ran from April 2009 to September 2012, and was made up of a consortium of 41 partners - research organisations, universities and small organisations - from 13 countries across Europe. The project was supported by an €8m grant from the EC's seventh framework programme (FP7), and continued on from the highly successful HERMES project. Whilst research within the HERMIONE project has now ended, many of our partners are continuing the research within their own organisations.