Ellen Fallowfieled

Ellen Fallowfieled
Hochschule für Musik der Stadt Basel · Department of Music

About

5
Publications
430
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
3
Citations
Citations since 2017
4 Research Items
1 Citation
20172018201920202021202220230.00.51.01.52.02.53.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.51.01.52.02.53.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.51.01.52.02.53.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.51.01.52.02.53.0

Publications

Publications (5)
Experiment Findings
Article
This article presents selected results from a research project on cello multiphonics at the Hochschule für Musik Basel within which I am producing updated fingering charts in a smartphone application and affiliated online repository. The article details work that has informed this resource and illustrates results that reveal critical questions and...
Article
EDITORIAL: THE ART OF THE STRING MULTIPHONIC - Volume 74 Issue 291 - Christopher Fox, Ellen Fallowfield
Article
Mike Svoboda and Michel Roth , The Techniques of Trombone Playing. Kassel: Bärenreiter, 2017. €54 - Volume 72 Issue 283 - Ellen Fallowfield

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Archived project
Cello Map is a practical resource for those who are interested in performing and writing contemporary music for cello. It is a map because it is a physical plan for exploring the instrument, and because the aim is to map ‘actions that a cellist can make’ onto ‘sounds that a cello can produce’. In other words, I have tried to reduce the cello and cellist to scales of actions and sounds, and show how cellists can influence sound (loudness, overtone content, pitch…) by their actions (bow speed, contact point, stopping position…). This standpoint is a deliberate move away from providing performers and composers with catalogues of special effects and extended techniques. Instead, I would like to provide information about how the cello works that can serve the imagination of performers and composers.
Project
Through interdisciplinary research and a radical reimagining of the structure of conventional resources, I propose a multidimensional, ‘kaleidoscopic’ approach to meet musicians' need for new methods to support the performance of modern classical music. This innovative solution draws together the need for a better understanding of modern technique, the richness and seriousness offered by interdisciplinary research and the wave of popularity for online self-teaching resources. I will use the cello as a test case and, based on the experience and knowledge garnered within the project, expand this work to other instruments in the future. I will create a laboratory situation to undertake empirical research to investigate cellists’ learning methods, define key aspects of contemporary cello technique, and analyse the physics of the instrument. The results will constitute publishable interdisciplinary work and will inform the development of a new resource for cellists: The Kaleidoscope Etudes. Inspired by the structure of a kaleidoscope, this resource will provide newly composed musical fragments that can be flexibly configured into larger-scale etudes. In contrast to the traditional etude-book format, this resource follows the innovative idea, enabled by technology, to simulate the musician’s learning process: breaking down a technical problem into small components and reconfiguring it in a musical context. This project will spark interest in contemporary music within the musician community and constitute a model for future interdisciplinary performance research.
Project
In this project, we investigate cello multiphonics and create a smartphone application to present the results to performers and composers. The aim of this research is to significantly contribute to the theory behind cello multiphonics and address the current gaps in physical and psychoacoustical understanding of the technique. The smartphone application will constitute a bridge between theory and practice and enable the results to be applied musically by performers and composers. Multiphonics on all instruments have been an important area of interest for many influential composers since the mid-20th century, and string multiphonics, especially on the cello and double bass, are being increasingly used, not least since the former’s inclusion in the publication www.cellomap.com, a resource developed at the Hochschule für Musik FHNW’s research department. To contextualise this work, it is valuable to look at the research model for woodwind multiphonics: the development of woodwind multiphonics has followed a clear and productive path, from early use in jazz in the 1950s to musical and acoustical investigation, and the provision of excellent resources for musicians (extensive fingering charts now exist for most woodwind instruments, a notable example being The Techniques of Saxophone Playing, Bärenreiter, 2011, by Marcus Weiss and Giorgio Netti, the product of a research project at the Hochschule für Musik FHNW). As a result, woodwind multiphonics have become established in performance and compositional practice across musical genres. Research into string multiphonics lags behind the woodwind model, and consequently their musical use is restricted. This project undertakes the work that is urgently needed to understand multiphonics on the cello so that they can be as creatively important as they have been for woodwind instruments. Key research areas are: the pitch content of multiphonics (including setting a meaningful upper boundary of influential pitch and determining the significance of various ‘noises’ and non-harmonic pitch content) and the influence that playing parameters have on timbre, loudness and tuning. An algorithm that determines multiphonic components, devised by Caspar Johannes Walter, composition professor at the Hochschule für Musik FHNW, constitutes an important basis for this work. This will be the first smartphone application for multiphonics on any instrument and we predict an opening in the market for such resources. This project aims to establish a new model for performance practice resources and change the way that contemporary instrumental technique is learned by musicians of all abilities and backgrounds.