Ellen Crocker

Ellen Crocker
University of Kentucky | UKY · Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

PhD, Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology

About

17
Publications
1,482
Reads
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140
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2015 - present
University of Kentucky
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Forest health specialist, focusing on invasive pathogens, insects, and plants affecting eastern hardwood forests. Primary focus is in education and outreach, working with KY Forestry Extension.
Education
August 2009 - May 2015
Cornell University
Field of study
  • Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology
August 2002 - May 2006
Williams College
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
Larch caterpillars are widely distributed in the Great Xing’an boreal forests; however, the relationship between caterpillar defoliation dynamics and climatic factors is poorly understood. The aims of this study are to investigate the primary weather conditions that might influence forest defoliation and to identify the most important life stage of...
Article
The 35th biennial Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference (SFTIC) was held on the 4th and 5th day of June 2019, in Lexington, KY, USA. The theme of the conference was “Genetics and improvement of forest health and productivity”. Plenary speakers detailed significant progress in understanding forest tree genomes, identifying candidate genes for...
Article
Oaks (Quercus spp.) are keystone species in many ecosystems and are ecologically as well as economically valuable. The objective of this study was to gather and evaluate information from a diverse group of oak experts on current and future biotic and abiotic threats to oaks in the eastern United States. Using a Delphi survey method with three itera...
Article
Oaks (Quercus spp.) are keystone species in many ecosystems and are ecologically as well as economically valuable. The objective of this study was to gather and evaluate information from a diverse group of oak experts on current and future biotic and abiotic threats to oaks in the eastern United States. Using a Delphi survey method with three itera...
Article
Full-text available
The emerald ash borer (EAB) was first detected in North America in 2002, and since its introduction, this invasive pest has killed millions of ash trees. While EAB kills native North American ash trees in all settings, its impacts have been especially large in urban areas where ash has been a dominant street tree, especially in residential areas. W...
Article
Full-text available
The scientists that study and work to improve forest health need information on where pests and diseases are spreading, as well as where healthy, resilient trees remain. TreeSnap is a citizen science project and mobile app created to meet this need by enabling citizens to easily submit global positioning system (GPS) locations, photos, and observat...
Article
Full-text available
Anticipating how boreal forest landscapes will change in response to changing fire regime requires disentangling the effects of various spatial controls on the recovery process of tree saplings. Spatially explicit monitoring of post-fire vegetation recovery through moderate resolution Landsat imagery is a popular technique but is filled with ambigu...
Article
Phytophthora cinnamomi is a soil-borne plant pathogen of global significance, threatening many forest tree species around the world. In contrast to other well-known tree pathogens, P. cinnamomi is a generalist pathogen that, in many cases, causes less immediately obvious symptoms, making P. cinnamomi more difficult to diagnose. This creates special...
Article
Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands causes root rot in a number of important forest tree species around the world, including American chestnut (Castanea dentata) and shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata). Conventionalmethods for detecting P. cinnamomi in forest soils may require too much time and space to permit widescale and long-term screening of the large sa...
Article
Full-text available
Interactions between introduced plants and soils they colonize are central to invasive species success in many systems. Belowground biotic and abiotic changes can influence the success of introduced species as well as their native competitors. All plants alter soil properties after colonization but, in the case of many invasive plant species, it is...
Article
Full-text available
Seed germination and seedling establishment are central to the distribution and abundance of plant species in wetlands. While fungal and oomycete pathogens are known to affect seed viability and emergence, relatively little is known about which fungi and oomycetes are associated with seeds in the soil or how these species affect seeds and seedlings...
Article
Full-text available
Soil pathogens affect plant community structure and function through negative plant–soil feedbacks that may contribute to the invasiveness of non-native plant species. Our understanding of these pathogen-induced soil feedbacks has relied largely on observations of the collective impact of the soil biota on plant populations, with few observations o...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods In natural ecosystems plant pathogens play key roles in regulating plant community dynamics. This is particularly relevant in invasion biology as some invasive plants gain an advantage over competitors through their interactions with components of the soil biota, especially soil pathogens. Phragmites australis is one o...

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