Ella Moeck

Ella Moeck
University of Melbourne | MSD · Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

20
Publications
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152
Citations
Introduction

Publications

Publications (20)
Preprint
Adopting a detached perspective—known as distancing—while reflecting on stressors can facilitate emotional recovery. Researchers have theorized that distancing works by enabling reappraisals of negative events, yet few studies have investigated specifically how distancing impacts stressor appraisals. In this experiment, we investigated how particip...
Preprint
Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, policy makers have tried to balance the effectiveness of lockdowns (or stay-at-home orders) with their potential mental health costs. Yet, two years into the pandemic, we are still lacking solid evidence about the emotional toll of lockdowns. Across two intensive longitudinal datasets with 14,511 observations colle...
Article
Full-text available
In Western cultures, the ideal body for women is thin and toned. Idealization of thinness has led many women to desire bodies with an underweight body mass index (BMI). The present study investigated women's knowledge of BMI, particularly relating to their own body ideals, to determine whether women knowingly idealize bodies categorized as “underwe...
Preprint
Affective forecasting—how people think they will feel in the future—is theorized to benefit well-being, but there is scarce evidence for this link. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether (1) people can accurately forecast their affect for the next day and week, and (2) whether accurate forecasts benefit well-being. Participants (N = 209) complete...
Article
To comprehensively understand and treat Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), we need to accurately assess how PTSD symptoms affect people’s daily functioning (e.g., in work, study, and relationships). However, the predominant use of self-report functional impairment measures—which are not validated against observable behavior—limits our understand...
Preprint
Higher education provides a pathway for military veterans to transition to an engaged civilian life. Veterans can be model students because of their diverse experiences, resilience, and discipline. Yet some veterans are simultaneously “at-risk”; most are non-traditional students and more likely than the general population to face mental/physical he...
Article
Burnette et al. aimed to validate two eating disorder symptom measures among transgender adults recruited from Mechanical Turk (MTurk). After identifying several data quality issues, Burnette et al. abandoned this aim and instead documented the issues they faced (e.g., demographic misrepresentation, repeat submissions, inconsistent responses across...
Preprint
Full-text available
While emotion regulation often happens in the presence of others, little is known about how social context shapes regulatory efforts and outcomes. One key element of the social context is social support. In two experience sampling studies (Ns = 179 and 123), we examined how the use and affective consequences of two fundamentally social emotion regu...
Article
Objective Veganism may serve as a socially acceptable means to restrict food intake and disguise pathological eating behaviours. Studies that include vegan participants typically group them with other meat avoiders (e.g., vegetarians), potentially masking risk factors unique to veganism.Method We addressed this issue by recruiting two Amazon Mechan...
Preprint
Lay wisdom suggests feeling negative in advance of an outcome – anticipatory negative emotion – shields against the blow of bad news. However, evidence is mixed, with different lines of research finding that anticipatory negative emotion is helpful, harmful, or has no effect on emotional outcomes. We set out to reconcile the competing findings by e...
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Disgust is remembered better than fear, despite both emotions being highly negative and arousing. But the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well-understood. Therefore, we compared two proposed mechanisms underlying superior memory for disgust. According to the memory consolidation mechanism, it is harder (but crucial) to remember potentiall...
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Food and alcohol disturbance involves restricting, purging, or excessively exercising to compensate for the calories consumed from drinking alcohol, or to enhance intoxication levels. But these compensatory behaviors, colloquially termed “drunkorexia,” have only been investigated in young adult samples—primarily college students—who are presumed to...
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Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic does not fit into prevailing Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) models, or diagnostic criteria, yet emerging research shows traumatic stress symptoms as a result of this ongoing global stressor. Current pathogenic event models focus on past, and largely direct, trauma exposure to certain kinds of life-threatening events. Ye...
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Attention is unequally distributed across the visual field. Due to greater right than left hemisphere activation for visuospatial attention, people attend slightly more to the left than the right side. As a result, people voluntarily remember visual stimuli better when it first appears in the left than the right visual field. But does this effect—t...
Article
It is often crucial to attend to relevant, and ignore irrelevant, visual information. But when irrelevant information is emotional, it reflexively captures attention, impairing noticing of neutral targets appearing directly afterwards. This robust effect is known as emotion induced blindness. We tested whether emotion induced blindness is exacerbat...
Preprint
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic does not fit into prevailing Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) models, or diagnostic criteria, yet emerging research shows traumatic stress symptoms as a result of this ongoing global stressor. Current pathogenic event models focus on past, and largely direct, trauma exposure to certain kinds of life-threatening events. Ne...
Article
Full-text available
The unilateral contractions procedure (i.e., squeezing a ball with one hand) supposedly enhances a wide variety of cognitive functions, from episodic recall to choking under pressure. The practicality and affordability of this procedure makes it highly appealing. But does it work? We addressed this question by testing whether intermittent and susta...
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Full-text available
The right hemisphere plays a critical role in visuospatial attention and emotional perception, particularly for negative emotions. Therefore, preferential processing of emotional stimuli by the right, compared to the left, hemisphere could enhance our memory for emotional stimuli. We examined whether recognition memory for negative versus neutral I...
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Full-text available
Involuntary cognitions—thoughts that arise spontaneously without conscious effort—are an everyday phenomenon. These cognitions include future thoughts, autobiographical memories, and, perhaps most commonly, earworms. Earworms—the experience of having a song stuck in your head—provide a window into the mind. We used earworms of instrumental music to...
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To contribute to the 2015 Conference Retrospective, we chronicled the 22-year history of the Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition (SARMAC). Throughout the 70s, 80s, and early 90s, there was no society dedicated to applied cognitive work. That changed in 1994, when researchers at the third iteration of the Practical Aspects of Memory...

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