Ella Gilbert

Ella Gilbert
British Antarctic Survey | BAS

PhD

About

12
Publications
873
Reads
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180
Citations
Citations since 2017
12 Research Items
180 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
Introduction
Research interests: Antarctic weather and climate, high-resolution regional modelling, surface energy balance, atmosphere-ice interactions, cloud microphysics Primary research methods: high-resolution (NWP-scale) regional models e.g. MetUM, MAR, CCAM; LES (MONC); aircraft cloud observations, AWS data. Current work: high-resolution regional climate modelling of the Arctic and Antarctic 1980-2100 (PolarRES project).
Education
October 2016 - March 2020
British Antarctic Survey
Field of study
  • Antarctic Climate Change
September 2014 - September 2015
University of East Anglia
Field of study
  • Climate Change
September 2011 - June 2014
University of East Anglia
Field of study
  • Environmental Geography & International Development

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
We calculate a regional surface “melt potential” index (MPI) over Antarctic ice shelves that describes the frequency (MPI-freq, %) and intensity (MPI-int, K) of daily maximum summer temperatures exceeding a melt threshold of 273.15 K. This is used to determine which ice shelves are vulnerable to melt-induced hydrofracture and is calculated using ne...
Article
Full-text available
Recent warm atmospheric conditions have damaged the ice shelves of the Antarctic Peninsula through surface melt and hydrofracturing and could potentially initiate future collapse of other Antarctic ice shelves. However, model projections with similar greenhouse gas scenarios suggest large differences in cumulative 21st-century surface melting. So f...
Article
Full-text available
Following collapses of the neighboring Larsen A and B ice shelves, Larsen C has become a focus of increased attention. Determining how the prevailing meteorological conditions influence its surface melt regime is of paramount importance for understanding the dominant processes causing melt and ultimately for predicting its future. To this end, a ne...
Article
Full-text available
Quantifying the relative importance of the atmospheric drivers of surface melting on the Larsen C ice shelf is critical in the context of recent and future climate change. Here, we present analysis of a new multidecadal, high‐resolution model hindcast using the Met Office Unified Model, described in Part 1 of this study. We evaluate the contributio...
Preprint
Full-text available
Recent warm atmospheric conditions have damaged the ice shelves of the Antarctic Peninsula through surface melt and hydrofracturing, and could potentially initiate future collapse of other Antarctic ice shelves. However, model projections with similar greenhouse gas scenarios suggest large differences in cumulative 21st century surface melting. So...
Article
Full-text available
A foehn event on 27 January 2011 over the Larsen C Ice Shelf (LCIS), Antarctic Peninsula and its interaction with an exisiting ground‐based cold‐air pool is simulated using the MetUM atmospheric model at kilometre and sub‐kilometre scale grid spacing. Atmospheric model simulations at kilometre grid scales are an important tool for understanding the...
Article
Full-text available
The future surface mass balance (SMB) of Antarctic ice shelves has not been constrained with models of sufficient resolution and complexity. Here, we force the high‐resolution Modèle Atmosphérique Régional with future simulations from four CMIP models to evaluate the likely effects on the SMB of warming of 1.5°C, 2°C, and 4°C above pre‐industrial t...
Article
Full-text available
Recent ice shelf retreat on the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula has been principally attributed to atmospherically driven melt. However, previous studies on the largest of these ice shelves—Larsen C—have struggled to reconcile atmospheric forcing with observed melt. This study provides the first comprehensive quantification and explanation of...
Article
Full-text available
Surface melting on Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves can influence ice shelf mass balance, and consequently sea level rise. We show that summertime cloud phase on the Larsen C ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula strongly influences the amount of radiation received at the surface and can determine whether or not melting occurs. While previous work ha...
Article
Full-text available
The occurrence of surface melt in Antarctica has hitherto been associated with the austral summer season, when the dominant source of melt energy is provided by solar radiation. We use in‐situ and satellite observations from a previously unsurveyed region to show that events of intense surface melt on Larsen C Ice Shelf occur frequently throughout...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
PolarRES will study the interactions between the atmosphere, oceans, and sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic to provide new insights into the key physical and chemical processes of these interactions on a local and regional level. We will assess how the processes respond to and influence projected changes in the global circulation and what this means for the society and the environment.
Project
Investigate the processes active over the Larsen C ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula. Use this to identify the drivers of melt and change, and perhaps create a climatology. This can then be used to generate future projections regarding change.