Elizabeth Walsh

Elizabeth Walsh
United States Department of Agriculture | USDA · Agricultural Research Service (ARS)

Doctor of Philosophy

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8
Publications
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34
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
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Recent work demonstrated that honey bee ( Apis mellifera L.) queens reared in pesticide-laden beeswax exhibit significant changes in the composition of the chemicals produced by their mandibular glands including those that comprise queen mandibular pheromone, which is a critical signal used in mating as well as queen tending behavior. For the prese...
Article
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Most honey bee (Apis mellifera Linnaeus, 1758) (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies in the United States have been exposed to the beekeeper-applied miticides amitraz, coumaphos, and tau-fluvalinate. Colonies are also often exposed to agrochemicals, which bees encounter on foraging trips. These and other lipophilic pesticides bind to the beeswax matrix of...
Article
Full-text available
Information regarding black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) adult biology is vital as this is the life-stage that produces eggs and thus drives population size. The goals of this study were to determine key biological characteristics of adult black soldier flies as they age in relation to: (1) the thermal preferences (Tsel) of males and female...
Article
Full-text available
Pollinator diversity and abundance in North America have been at a steep decline over the last two decades due to the combinatorial effects of several environmental and anthropogenic stressors. In particular, managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) face multiple health risks including nutritional stress, exposure to pests and pathogens, poor queen qual...
Article
Full-text available
Widespread use of agrochemicals in the U.S. has led to nearly universal contamination of beeswax in honey bee hives. The most commonly found agrochemicals in wax include beekeeper-applied miticides containing tau-fluvalinate, coumaphos, or amitraz, and field-applied pesticides containing chlorothalonil or chlorpyrifos. Wax contaminated with these p...
Article
Full-text available
A short overview of honey bee (A. mellifera, L.) queen pheromones, specifically QMP, with mandibular gland dissection methodology and pictures.
Article
Full-text available
As the number of small-scale local queen operations increase, questions regarding queen quality and how beekeepers can measure queen quality also arise. By shifting the focus from simply rearing queens to instead rearing “high quality” queens through the establishment of local breeding programs, local honey bee queen producers and honey bee queen b...

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