Elizabeth Phillips

Elizabeth Phillips
Wageningen University & Research | WUR · Department of Behavioral Ecology

Bachelor of Science

About

8
Publications
420
Reads
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9
Citations
Introduction
Currently a PhD student in the Behavioral Ecology Group at Wageningen University & Research in the Netherlands, studying cognitive evolution in fish. Follow me on Twitter! @lizwphillips17
Additional affiliations
June 2019 - present
Michigan State University
Position
  • Research Technologist
January 2017 - May 2019
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2015 - May 2019

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
Many species display alloparental care, where individuals care for offspring that are not their own, but usually the behavior is contingent on the individual receiving some direct or indirect benefit. In anemonefish, after removing the breeding male, non-breeders have been observed providing care for eggs they did not sire and which are not kin. Pr...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species are globally on the rise due to human-induced environmental change and are often a source of harm to their new ecosystems. Tracking the spread of invaders is crucial to better manage invasive species, and citizen science is often used to collect sighting data. However, this can be unreliable due to the general public's limited expe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Invasive species are globally on the rise due to human-induced environmental change and are often a source of harm to their new ecosystems. Tracking the spread of invaders is crucial to better management of invasive species, and citizen science is often used to collect sighting data. However, this can be unreliable due to the general public's limit...
Poster
Darwinian theory predicts that individuals will display energetically costly parental care behaviors towards genetically related offspring rather than unrelated offspring. Curiously, after removing the breeding male, Amphiprion non-breeders have been observed step-fathering unrelated offspring. This was assumed to be due to coercion by the breeding...
Presentation
Darwinian theory predicts that individuals will more frequently display energetically costly parental care behaviors towards genetically related offspring than unrelated. Amphiprion ocellaris represents a unique species where small groups of unrelated individuals live together in the same territory. These groups consist of a dominant monogamous pai...
Thesis
Full-text available
Darwinian theory predicts that individuals will display energetically costly parental care behaviors towards genetically related offspring rather than unrelated offspring. Curiously, after removing the breeding male, Amphiprion non-breeders have been observed step-fathering unrelated offspring. This was assumed to be due to coercion by the breeding...
Poster
Full-text available
Running training programs attempt to reduce risk for injury and promote good form during activity. Risk of running injury tends to be higher for women than men, and kinematic patterns may underlie this injury risk. Decreased knee flexion and increased hip abduction are often observed and proposed as a reason for increased ACL injury among women (Ma...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
As individuals invade novel environments during the invasion process, populations in the native range and front often experience different challenges and begin to diverge in traits. While this is well established in morphological characteristics, the consequences of biological invasions on cognition and the mechanisms that facilitate these differences remains enigmatic. What makes some species good invaders and which cognitive traits are important for such processes? This project investigates the how cognitive abilities and invasion are linked. We plan to use the Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois spp.) as a model for these questions by exploring the cognitive landscape of fish from the native range (Red Sea) and two invasive ranges (Caribbean and Mediterranean) using behavioral tests, learning assays, and brain morphology.
Archived project
Determine extent and cause of step-fathering in the A. ocellaris non-breeders