Elizabeth A. Nyboer

Elizabeth A. Nyboer
Carleton University · Department of Biology

PhD

About

37
Publications
9,550
Reads
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445
Citations
Citations since 2016
32 Research Items
421 Citations
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Introduction
I am a freshwater ecologist and conservation scientist exploring how anthropogenic stressors affect biodiversity and ecosystem services in inland aquatic ecosystems. I use both quantitative and qualitative methodologies to integrate social, ecological, and environmental data to understand the vulnerability of these systems to environmental change.

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Full-text available
Fishes faced with novel thermal conditions often modify physiological functioning to compensate for elevated temperatures. This physiological plasticity (thermal acclimation) has been shown to improve metabolic performance and extend thermal limits in many species. Adjustments in cardiorespiratory function are often invoked as mechanisms underlying...
Article
We tested whether thermal tolerance and aerobic performance differed between two populations of Nile perch (Lates niloticus) originating from the same source population six decades after their introduction into two lakes in the Lake Victoria basin in East Africa. We used short‐term acclimation of juvenile fish to a range of temperatures from ambien...
Article
The COVID-19 global pandemic and resulting effects on the economy and society (e.g., sheltering-in-place, alterations in transportation, changes in consumer behaviour, loss of employment) have yielded some benefits and risks to biodiversity. Here, we considered the ways the COVID-19 pandemic has influenced (or may influence) freshwater fish biodive...
Article
Full-text available
Scientific evidence is fundamental for guiding effective conservation action to curb biodiversity loss. Yet, research resources in conservation are often wasted due to biased allocation of research effort, irrelevant or low‐priority questions, flawed studies, inaccessible research outputs, and biased or poor‐quality reporting. We outline a striking...
Chapter
Freshwater organisms face multiple threats associated with habitat degradation, pollution, and eutrophication, in addition to overharvesting and species invasions. Furthermore, there is mounting evidence that freshwaters are highly sensitive to climate change. This chapter provides an overview of contemporary environmental changes in inland waters...
Article
Full-text available
Inland fisheries support the livelihoods of millions of people in riparian communities worldwide but are influenced by increasing climate variability and change. Freshwater fishing societies are among the most vulnerable to climate change given their dependence on highly threatened aquatic resources. As climate change intensifies, building adaptive...
Article
Full-text available
Inland recreational fisheries, found in lakes, rivers, and other landlocked waters, are important to livelihoods, nutrition, leisure, and other societal ecosystem services worldwide. Although recreationally-caught fish are frequently harvested and consumed by fishers, their contribution to food and nutrition has not been adequately quantified due t...
Article
Full-text available
Fisheries are highly complex social-ecological systems that often face ‘wicked’ problems from unsustainable resource management to climate change. Addressing these challenges requires transdisciplinary approaches that integrate perspectives across scientific disciplines and knowledge systems. Despite widespread calls for transdisciplinary fisheries...
Article
Inland recreational fisheries provide numerous socio-economic benefits to fishers, families and communities. Recreationally harvested fish are also frequently consumed and may provide affordable and sustainable but undervalued contributions to human nutrition. Quantifying the degree to which recreationally harvested fish contribute to food security...
Article
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Early definitions of conservation focused largely on the end goals of protection or restoration of nature, and the various disciplinary domains that contribute to these ends. Conservation science and practice has evolved beyond being focused on just issues of scarcity and biodiversity decline. To better recognize the inherent links between human be...
Article
Life in the Anthropocene is characterized by many environmental problems, and unfortunately, more continue to emerge. Although much effort is focused on identifying problems, this does not necessarily translate to solutions. This situation extends to the training environment, where students are often adept at understanding and dissecting problems b...
Article
Full-text available
Inland fisheries make substantial contributions to food security and livelihoods locally, regionally, and globally but their conservation and management have been largely overlooked by policy makers. In an effort to remedy this limited recognition, a cross-sectoral community of scientists, practitioners, and policy makers from around the world conv...
Article
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Despite contributing to healthy diets for billions of people, aquatic foods are often undervalued as a nutritional solution because their diversity is often reduced to the protein and energy value of a single food type (‘seafood’ or ‘fish’)1–4. Here we create a cohesive model that unites terrestrial foods with nearly 3,000 taxa of aquatic foods to...
Article
Full-text available
For better or for worse, authorship is a currency in scholarly research and advancement. In scholarly writing, authorship is widely acknowledged as a means of conferring credit but is also tied to concepts such as responsibility and accountability. Authorship is one of the most divisive topics both at the level of the research team and more broadly...
Article
Recreational fisheries contribute substantially to the sociocultural and economic well-being of coastal and riparian regions worldwide, but climate change threatens their sustainability. Fishery managers require information on how climate change will impact key recreational species; however, the absence of a global assessment hinders both directed...
Article
Successful incorporation of scientific knowledge into environmental policy and decisions is a significant challenge. Although studies on how to bridge the knowledge-action gap have proliferated over the last decade, few have investigated the roles, responsibilities, and opportunities for funding bodies to meet this challenge. In this study we prese...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Freshwater biodiversity loss is one of the greatest environmental threats in our changing world. Although declines have been reported extensively in the literature, much less attention has been devoted to solving the freshwater biodiversity crisis relative to other ecosystems. The recently proposed Emergency Recovery Plan for Freshwater Bi...
Preprint
Successful incorporation of scientific knowledge into environmental policy and decisions is a significant challenge. Although studies on how to bridge the knowledge-action gap have grown rapidly over the last decade, few have investigated the roles, responsibilities, and opportunities for funding bodies to meet this challenge. In this study we pres...
Article
Full-text available
Practitioners and policymakers working in environmental arenas make decisions that can have large impacts on ecosystems. Basing such decisions on high‐quality evidence about the effectiveness of different interventions can often maximize the success of policy and management. Accordingly, it is vital to understand how environmental professionals wor...
Article
Full-text available
To address the ongoing global biodiversity crisis, conservation approaches must be underpinned by robust information. Canada is uniquely positioned to contribute to meeting global biodiversity targets, with some of the world's largest remaining intact ecosystems, and a commitment to co-application of Indigenous ways of knowing alongside scientific,...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental decision-makers and practitioners need and deserve high quality environmental evidence for effective decision-making. We collate and share a suite of best practices for applied environmental researchers to support their capacity to inform such decision-making processes. This raises a number of important questions: What does “relevant”...
Article
In reflecting on the human domination of our planet in the Anthropocene, some have argued that concrete is among the most destructive materials created by humans. Here we explore this idea, specifically in the context of what we consider “the concrete conquest of aquatic ecosystems.” The ubiquitous use of concrete in transportation and building inf...
Article
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Teaching can be a rewarding, yet challenging, experience for early career researchers (ECRs) in fields like ecology and evolution. Much of this challenge arises from the reality that ECRs in ecology and evolution typically receive little, if any, pedagogical training or advice on how to balance teaching, research (which can include extended field w...
Article
Horizon scanning is a systematic approach increasingly used in conservation to explore emerging trends, issues, opportunities, and threats. We present the results from one such exercise aimed at identifying emerging issues that could have important scientific, social, technological, and managerial implications for the conservation of inland waters...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing water temperatures due to anthropogenic climate change are predicted to negatively impact the aerobic metabolic performance of aquatic ectotherms. Specifically, it has been hypothesized that thermal increases result in reductions in aerobic scope (AS), which lead to decreases in energy available for essential fitness and performance func...
Article
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External body colour is an important trait contributing to phenotypic diversity and individual fitness in fish species. In this study, we use a combination of experimental techniques and field observations to examine patterns of colour divergence in the introduced Nile perch population of Lake Nabugabo, Uganda. We aim to determine whether the propo...
Article
Full-text available
Collective action theory predicts that natural resource management at a local level has a higher probability of success if territoriality and jurisdiction of the managerial institution are in synchrony with mobility and territoriality of the resource and exploitation patterns of local users. In several East African lakes local managerial institutio...
Article
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Habitat‐associated trait divergence may vary across ontogeny if there are strong size‐related shifts in selection pressures. We quantified patterns of phenotypic divergence in Nile perch (Lates niloticus) from ecologically distinct wetland edge and forest edge habitats in Lake Nabugabo, Uganda, and we compared patterns of divergence across three si...
Article
Full-text available
Nile perch (Lates niloticus) was introduced to the Lake Victoria basin in the 1950s and 1960s and eventually became one of the most valuable commercial species of East Africa's inland fisheries. Intense fishing-induced mortality may be contributing to dramatic ecological change in this species (reductions in body size and catch rate) and reinforcin...
Article
Full-text available
Mating systems that comprise a mixture of pure males and self-fertilising hermaphrodites remain an evolutionary enigma. In particular, our understanding of the sexual selection pressures associated with such mating systems is nascent. Males can only reproduce by fertilising hermaphrodites’ eggs, but hermaphrodites can also fertilise their own eggs...

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