Elizabeth Nisbet

Elizabeth Nisbet
Trent University · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

22
Publications
28,830
Reads
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3,104
Citations
Citations since 2016
5 Research Items
2637 Citations
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Introduction
I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology, at Trent University. My research focusses on individual differences in 'nature relatedness' and the consequences for psychological well-being, health, and environmentally sustainable behaviour. Current projects include the effects of nature immersion, citizen science engagement, and identifying specific beneficial elements of nature.
Additional affiliations
July 2012 - present
Trent University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
May 2008 - July 2012
Carleton University
Position
  • Contract Instructor

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
From the increasing number of people living in urban areas to the continued degradation of the natural environment, many of us appear to be physically and psychologically disconnected from nature. We consider the theoretical explanations and present evidence for why this state of affairs might result in suboptimal levels of hedonic and eudaimonic w...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This paper summarizes the discussions from the Natural Environments Initiative meeting hosted by the Harvard School of Public Health’s Center for Global Health and the Environment and the Harvard Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies in October 2013. It presents ongoing worldwide research on health benefits stemming from exposure to natural envi...
Article
Full-text available
Subjective connection with nature, or nature relatedness, is similar to other environmental worldview measures in predicting sustainable attitudes and behaviors, yet is unique in predicting happiness. In two studies, the authors assessed the overlap between nature relatedness and other subjective connections (e.g., with friends or country) and exam...
Article
Full-text available
The construct of (dis)connection with nature or "nature relatedness" has become increasingly useful in the study of environmental behavior as well as psychological health and well-being. Strong nature relatedness is associated with greater happiness and ecologically sustainable behavior. A number of scales reliably assess individual differences in...
Article
Modern lifestyles disconnect people from nature, and this may have adverse consequences for the well-being of both humans and the environment. In two experiments, we found that although outdoor walks in nearby nature made participants much happier than indoor walks did, participants made affective forecasting errors, such that they systematically u...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted our economy, social lives, and mental health, and it therefore provides a unique chance for researchers to examine how people cope with changes to their everyday activities. Research suggests that people may be spending more time in nature than they did pre-pandemic. The current study sheds light on how nature is...
Article
Full-text available
Positive outcomes for psychological and physiological health have resulted from a nature experience. However, evidence is limited for nature-based interventions and their effect on a cancer population. The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to determine if incorporating the One Nature Challenge (ONC) into a ten-week group exercise program (WE-...
Article
Full-text available
Trees are an integral and salient feature of the natural environment with multiple benefits for environmental and human health. Little is understood, however, about how connectedness with trees or other features of nature (e.g., wildlife) are associated with human health perceptions and well-being. Similarly, research on links between neighborhood...
Article
Previous research has demonstrated that brief contact with the natural environment can boost feelings of connectedness with nature (nature relatedness) and mood. Less is known about whether mindful awareness of nature improves outdoor experiences, however. We tested the possibility that mindfulness instruction would enhance mood during nature expos...
Article
Leisure in parks and other forms of protected areas are connected to an individual’s health and well-being. In this paper, we report on the results of a multi-year study that surveyed 1,515 visitors to three Provincial Parks and three Kananaskis Country Provincial Recreation Areas in Alberta, Canada. Results revealed several important findings with...
Article
From the increasing number of people living in urban areas to the continued degradation of the natural environment, many of us appear to be physically and psychologically disconnected from nature. We consider the theoretical explanations and present evidence for why this state of affairs might result in suboptimal levels of hedonic and eudaimonic w...
Research
Full-text available
Technical Report - Summary of the 2015 DSF 30x30 Nature Challenge research study
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report details the results of an empirical study that examined perceived health and well-being motives and benefits among visitors to a sample of Alberta’s parks and protected areas. The study revealed several major findings with important policy and management implications. First, the human health and well-being benefits that the visitors exp...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report details the results of an empirical study that examined perceived health and well-being motives and benefits among visitors to a sample of Alberta’s parks and protected areas. The study revealed several major findings with important policy and management implications. First, the human health and well-being benefits that the visitors exp...
Article
Abstract Two studies tested whether nature (vs. built) photographs could increase participants' judgments of environmental satisfaction and perceived quality of life. In Study 1 (N=122), participants assigned to view local nature photographs were more satisfied with the conditions of their local environment, compared to those who viewed local built...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Nature relatedness - the subjective sense of connection with the natural environment - has the benefit of fostering greater human happiness as well as promoting ecologically sustainable behaviour. Increasing nature relatedness is challenging, however citizen science holds great potential for engaging people with the natural environment through expe...
Article
Nature relatedness (NR) describes the affective, cognitive, and experiential aspects of human–nature relationships (Nisbet in Environ Behav 41: 715–740, 2009). Evidence from three studies suggests that individual differences in NR are associated with differences in well-being. In study 1 (N=184), we explore associations between NR and a variety of...
Article
Disconnection from the natural world may be contributing to our planet's destruction. The authors propose a new construct, Nature Relatedness (NR), and a scale that assesses the affective, cognitive, and experiential aspects of individuals' connection to nature. In Study 1, the authors explored the internal structure of the NR item responses in a s...
Article
Despite the links between the environment and health, campaigns designed to promote sustainable behaviour are rarely framed in terms of human health, and strategies to change health behaviour are not often applied to environmental behaviour. We illustrate the connections between health and the environment, and health behaviour and environmental beh...

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
community research on the effects of nature immersion interventions
Project
contrasting the effects of viewing natural and degraded environment photographs on mood and environmental concern