Elizabeth Lewis

Elizabeth Lewis
Newcastle University | NCL · School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences

BA, MA, MSci, PhD

About

41
Publications
12,618
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,217
Citations
Additional affiliations
February 2015 - present
Newcastle University
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Exploring drivers of change in extreme sub daily rainfall
Education
September 2011 - April 2016
Newcastle University
Field of study
  • Hydrology and climate change
October 2006 - June 2010
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Natural Sciences

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Full-text available
Short‐duration precipitation extremes (PE) increase at a rate of around 7%/K explained by the Clausius‐Clapeyron relationship. Previous studies show uncertainty in the extreme precipitation‐temperature relationship (scaling) due to various thermodynamic/dynamic factors. Here, we show that uncertainty may arise from the choice of data and methods. U...
Conference Paper
Short-duration (hourly) precipitation extremes have intensified in the past and they are projected to increase more under the warming climate. The Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) relationship can be used to understand the sensitivity (scaling) of precipitation extremes with warming. According to the CC relationship, hourly precipitation extremes intensify...
Article
Sub-daily rainfall observations are vital to help us understand, model and adapt to changing climate extremes. However, gauge records often have quality issues, for example due to equipment malfunctions and recording errors. This paper presents a new, open-source quality control algorithm (GSDR-QC) to identify these issues in hourly rainfall data,...
Article
A large number of recent studies have aimed at understanding short-duration rainfall extremes, due to their impacts on flash floods, landslides and debris flows and potential for these to worsen with global warming. This has been led in a concerted international effort by the INTENSE Crosscutting Project of the GEWEX (Global Energy and Water Exchan...
Article
https://rdcu.be/cdCei Short-duration (1–3 h) rainfall extremes can cause serious damage to societies through rapidly developing (flash) flooding and are determined by complex, multifaceted processes that are altering as Earth’s climate warms. In this Review, we examine evidence from observational, theoretical and modelling studies for the intensif...
Article
Full-text available
Hourly precipitation extremes can intensify with temperature at higher rates than expected from thermodynamic increases explained by the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) relationship (∼6.5%/K), but local scaling with surface air temperature is highly variable. Here we use daily dew point temperature, a direct proxy of absolute humidity, to estimate at-gauge...
Article
Full-text available
We introduce the Precipitation Probability DISTribution (PPDIST) dataset, a collection of global high-resolution (0.1°) observation-based climatologies (1979-2018) of the occurrence and peak intensity of precipitation (P) at daily and 3-hourly time-scales. The climatologies were produced using neural networks trained with daily P observations from...
Article
Full-text available
For the first time, we analyze 2.2 km UK Met Office Unified Model convection-permitting model (CPM) projections for a pan-European domain. These new simulations represent a major increase in domain size, allowing us to examine the benefits of CPMs across a range of European climates. We find a change to the seasonality of extreme precipitation with...
Article
Full-text available
Plain Language Summary Major floods and rainfall‐related impacts are often caused by short‐duration heavy rainfall events. Although there is evidence of cities modifying rainfall in many urban areas, uncertainties still exist around their role in intense rainfall episodes. We investigate the impact of the growth of Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) on intens...
Article
Full-text available
We investigate the global distribution of hourly precipitation and its connections with the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) using both satellite precipitation estimates and the global sub-daily rainfall gauge dataset. Despite limited moisture availability over continental surfaces, we find that the highest mean and extreme hourly precipitation...
Article
Full-text available
There is an urgent need for high-quality and high-spatial-resolution hourly precipitation products around the globe, including the UK. Although hourly precipitation products exist for the UK, these either contain large errors, or are insufficient in spatial resolution. An efficient way to solve this is to develop a merged precipitation product that...
Article
Full-text available
While there are obstacles to the exchange of long-term high temporal resolution precipitation data, there have been fewer barriers to the exchange of so-called ‘indices’. These are derived from daily and sub-daily data and measure aspects of precipitation frequency, duration and intensity that could be used for the study of extremes. This paper out...
Article
Full-text available
Using data from 520 gauging stations in Britain and gridded rainfall datasets, the seasonality of storm rainfall and flood runoff is compared and mapped. Annual maximum (AMAX) daily rainfall occurs predominantly in summer, but AMAX floods occur most frequently in winter. Seasonal occurrences of annual daily rainfall and flood maxima differ by more...
Article
Full-text available
Climatological features of observed annual maximum hourly precipitation have not been documented systematically compared to those on daily timescales due to observational limitations. Drawing from a quality-controlled database of hourly records sampling different climatic regions including the United States, Australia, the British Isles, Japan, Ind...
Article
Full-text available
Extreme short-duration rainfall can cause devastating flooding that puts lives, infrastructure, and natural ecosystems at risk. It is therefore essential to understand how this type of extreme rainfall will change in a warmer world. A significant barrier to answering this question is the lack of sub-daily rainfall data available at the global scale...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Intensities and frequencies of extreme precipitation events have increased globally and are likely to rise further under the warming climate. The Clausius-Clapeyron (C-C) relationship provides a physical basis commonly used to understand the change of precipitation extremes with temperature. However, the local 'scaling' relationship can be affected...
Article
Full-text available
Temperature scaling studies suggest that hourly rainfall magnitudes might increase beyond thermodynamic expectations with global warming1–3; that is, above the Clausius–Clapeyron (CC) rate of ~6.5% °C−1. However, there is limited evidence of such increases in long-term observations. Here, we calculate continental-average changes in the magnitude an...
Article
Full-text available
High-resolution gridded precipitation products are rare globally, particularly below a daily time-step, yet many hydrological applications require, or can be improved by, a higher temporal resolution of rainfall data. Here, we present a new 1 km resolution gridded hourly rainfall dataset for Great Britain (Gridded estimates of hourly areal rainfall...
Article
The use of physically-based spatially-distributed models to solve problems in hydrology has been limited by their intensive data and setup time requirements. We have therefore created a system that enables the automatic setup of a robust, physically-based spatially-distributed SHETRAN model for any catchment, gauged or ungauged, in Great Britain. N...
Article
Full-text available
Historical in situ sub-daily rainfall observations are essential for the understanding of short-duration rainfall extremes but records are typically not readily accessible and data are often subject to errors and inhomogeneities. Furthermore, these events are poorly quantified in projections of future climate change making adaptation to the risk of...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the apparent simplicity, it is notoriously difficult to measure rainfall accurately because of the challenging environment within which it is measured. Systematic bias caused by wind is inherent in rainfall measurement and introduces an inconvenient unknown into hydrological science that is generally ignored. This paper examines the role of...
Article
Full-text available
Cities are particularly vulnerable to climate risks due to their agglomeration of people, buildings and infrastructure. Differences in methodology, hazards considered, and climate models used limit the utility and comparability of climate studies on individual cities. Here we assess, for the first time, future changes in flood, heat-waves (HW), and...
Article
Full-text available
Study region: Main international rivers of Iberia (SW Europe): Douro, Tagus and Guadiana. Study focus: Iberia has long suffered from water scarcity which will worsen with projected reductions in rainfall and increases in temperature. Nonetheless, there has been almost no research concerning the future discharges of these rivers. We examine an ensem...
Data
Figure S3. Change in seasonal 1 h R med after additional quality‐control procedures.
Data
Figure S9. Timing and magnitude of n1 events by extreme rainfall region.
Data
Figure S7. Seasonal 99.9th percentile wet hour amount.
Data
Figure S1. Time series of the mean proportions (p) of the three classes of quality‐control metadata for EA gauges for three regions and the number of contributing gauges (n).
Data
Figure S2. Relative frequencies of data flagged by the main quality‐control procedures applied to all data.
Data
Figure S6. Seasonal 99th percentile wet hour amount.
Data
Figure S8. Frequency of 1 h extreme rainfall alert (ERA) threshold events (≥30 mm h−1) after additional quality‐control procedures.
Data
Appendix S1. Additional analysis of the QC procedures and climatology of extremes, and a more detailed account of the FEH methodology for calculating the circular statistics.
Data
Figure S4. Number of recorded 1 h extreme rainfall alert (ERA) threshold events (≥30 mm h−1) removed by additional quality‐control procedures.
Article
Full-text available
Sub-daily rainfall extremes may be associated with flash flooding, particularly in urban areas but, compared with extremes on daily timescales, have been relatively little studied in many regions. This paper describes a new, hourly rainfall dataset for the UK based on ∼1600 rain gauges from three different data sources. This includes tipping bucket...
Chapter
Full-text available
Study aims and approach An aim of the UK NEA Follow-on (UK NEAFO) is to develop and communicate the evidence base of the UK NEA and make it relevant to decision and policy making. It also provides an important opportunity for those working on scenario methods and concepts to scrutinise the role of futures thinking in the management of ecosystem ser...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Grounded in both science and engineering, since 1985, the Water Group work to find and improve solutions to make our catchments, coastal zones, cities and infrastructure more productive, safer and sustainable for future generations. We educate talented students to the highest standards through our postgraduate MSc, MEng, PhD, and EngD programmes. Our students are the next generation of water researchers, policy makers and professionals. We work with academics, government, industry, and communities around the world to transform practice; improve quality of life; and, help to deliver the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. We develop solutions for water challenges, across all of our Research Themes: (I) Blue-Green Cities and Resilient Infrastructure; (ii) Catchment and Water Management; (iii) Climate Impacts and Adaptation; and, (iv) Flood Risk Management.
Project
The key questions for this project are: 1. How has sub-daily maximum precipitation changed over the last century, across continents, climate regimes and seasons? 2. How does precipitation at different time-scales vary with atmospheric temperature and atmospheric moisture as the atmosphere warms? 3. How do large-scale atmospheric and oceanic features influence or modulate the observed changes in precipitation extremes, the clustering of extremes and the variability between ‘drought’ and ‘flood’ periods, in different climate regimes and seasons? 4. What is the influence of climate model resolution and structure on the simulation of precipitation extremes for different climate regimes and seasons? 5. What is likely the response to warming of precipitation and precipitation extremes at different time- scales across different climate regimes? 6. How can we use information from both high-resolution and coarse-resolution climate models in a more intelligent way to inform climate change adaptation decision making to better manage extreme hydrological events?