Elisabeth Jay Friedman

Elisabeth Jay Friedman
University of San Francisco | USFCA · Politics Department

Doctor of Philosophy

About

76
Publications
12,818
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1,249
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (76)
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare -- and exacerbated -- deep-seated and interlocking inequalities. Women and gender non-conforming people, particularly those without class and ethnoracial privilege, are affected in gender-specific ways. Women are at the forefront of the care response as frontline healthcare workers and unpaid community and family...
Chapter
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Encyclopedia Entry: The Latin American LGBTQ community’s use of the internet and digital tools to create community, promote dialogue, and advocate for LGBTQ rights.
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Seeking Rights from the Left offers a unique comparative assessment of left-leaning Latin American governments by examining their engagement with feminist, women's, and LGBT movements and issues. Focusing on the “Pink Tide” in eight national cases—Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Uruguay, and Venezuela—the contributors evaluat...
Book
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Every user knows the importance of the “@” symbol in internet communication. Though the symbol barely existed in Latin America before the emergence of email, Spanish-speaking feminist activists immediately claimed it to replace the awkward “o/a” used to indicate both genders in written text, discovering an answer to the challenge of symbolic inclus...
Chapter
This chapter explores how architects of more recent Latin American counterpublics – particularly feminist, women’s, and queer organizations in Argentina, Mexico, and Brazil – have integrated the internet to support their goals of inclusion, community-building, and strategizing for social change. It focuses on the early experiences with the internet...
Chapter
This chapter traces the historical outlines of Latin American feminist counterpublics to show the kind of organizing, including alternative media use, that provided the foundation upon which more recent counterpublics would build. Through their publications and face-to-face meetings, activists during the late 19 th and early 20 th century developed...
Chapter
This chapter shows how Latin American lesbian feminist internet practices reflect their own circumstances and values. These have led them to focus their internet-based counterpublic work on privacy and visibility. They need a place for their private life, where they can find each other and build community away from the threat of violence and reject...
Chapter
The introduction sets out the conceptual framework and main subjects of the book. It acquaints readers with a feminist sociomaterial approach, which analyzes technology and society, particularly its gendered aspects, as an integrated whole, by insisting on the need to analyze internet practices in context. It also explains why Latin American femini...
Chapter
This chapter takes a deeper look at a transformation of the simple distribution list application into a vibrant online counterpublic. It profiles one of the region’s longest-lasting national feminist discussion lists: RIMA, the Red Informativa de Mujeres de Argentina (Women’s Information Network of Argentina). Large and diverse, it includes members...
Chapter
The conclusion to this book offers a brief portrayal of how the 2014 Latin American and Caribbean Feminist Encounter used internet applications to expand and enrich this unique regional counterpublic. It then summarizes the ways in which feminist and queer counterpublic organizations have reoriented and refined the way they have woven the internet...
Chapter
This chapter offers an alternative account of the invention of the internet. It tells the story of how social justice-oriented web enthusiasts built the internet as we know it today – a networks of networks – because they wanted to ensure access for activist counterpublics around the world. They concretized their goals with the formation of the Ass...
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On October 19, hundreds of thousands of women across Argentina [3] braved a torrential downpour to participate in two extraordinary protests: an unprecedented women's strike and a massive demonstration against femicide (femicidio)—that is, the killing of cis-gender and transwomen because of their gender. Reacting in rage and sorrow to the October 9...
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For feminist organizing in Latin America, divergent identities and political beliefs must be seen as fundamental, rather than incidental, to the movement.
Article
This article argues that Spain has been the driving external force in the advancement of LGBT rights in Latin America, from marriage in Argentina to the regional recognition of "sexual diversity rights" as human rights. Acting as "norm entrepreneurs," Spanish activists and organizations, relying on development aid, have promoted their perspectives...
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Between 1993 and 2000, nearly every democracy in Latin America passed a law prohibiting domestic violence. Between 2001 and 2006, five countries strengthened their legislation, and Brazil passed its first law. What explains these advances with respect to women's rights? While other work has focused on domestic or international factors, this article...
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This article examines the extent of change under Latin American left governments by assessing their actions on women's and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights. To provide a historical context, it first offers an overview of the relationship between feminist movements and the left. It then employs a four-country comparison of Brazil...
Article
This article examines the internet's potential to democratize gender equality advocacy in Latin America. Based on field research in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico, it challenges the assumption that the internet's horizontal organization and widespread dissemination inherently or inevitably lead to greater democratization. It advances two interrelate...
Article
This article takes up the question of whether civil society organizations (CSOs) can and do act as mechanisms of representation in times of party crisis. It looks at recent representation practices in Argentina, Bolivia, and Brazil, three countries where political parties have experienced sharp crises after several decades of mixed reviews for thei...
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This paper questions if the civil society organizations (in portuguese, OSCs) can and do accomplish their role of exercising a representative function in times of crisis of the political parties. In order to do so, it examines recent practices of representation in Brazil and in Argentina, two countries where political parties have gone through acut...
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Living in societies that use law, mainstream media and social opprobrium to deny their enjoyment of basic rights – and sometimes their very existence – Latin American lesbians have long relied on alternative ways of expressing and associating themselves. In the late 1990s, they adopted a powerful new tool that is also a'virtual' space: the internet...
Article
Activist Faith: Grassroots Women in Democratic Brazil and Chile. By Carol Drogus and Hannah Stewart-Gambino. University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press. 2005. 212 pp. $55.00. In the 1970s and 1980s, civil society–based movements rose up to fight against authoritarian regimes in the Southern Cone of Latin America. Some of the most unex...
Article
This article examines the internet's potential to democratize gender equality advocacy in Latin America. Based on field research in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico, it challenges the assumption that the internet's horizontal organization and widespread dissemination inherently or inevitably lead to greater democratization. It advances two interrelate...
Article
Sovereignty, Democracy, and Global Civil Society explores the growing power of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) by analyzing a microcosm of contemporary global state-society relations at UN World Conferences. The intense interactions between states and NGOs at conferences on the environment, human rights, women's issues, and other topics confir...
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Este artigo examina os Encontros Latino-Americanos e do Caribe como espaços críticos transnacionais onde se re-imagina a política dos feminismos na região. Enfocando o Oitavo desses Encontros, realizado em Juan Dolio, República Dominicana, em 1999, analisamos os principais debates politicos e filosóficos que surgiram durante 20 anos de Encontros: (...
Article
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In 1995, over 30,000 women's rights advocates attended the United Nations (UN) Fourth World Conference on Women and made a substantial difference in conference outcomes. However, advocates' achievements at their “own” conference was not the central gain of the 1990s. It was their success in “gendering the agenda” of the other global conferences of...
Article
Recent political and economic transitions in Latin America have shaped a third transition in the nature of civil society and democratic representation. The conceptual territory of democratic representational regimes can be mapped out in four theoretical patterns of state-society relations: adversarial, delegative, deliberative, and cooptive. A comp...
Chapter
In 1990, the Venezuelan Congress passed a reform of the Organic Labour Law that, among other provisions, gave women workers equal rights with men and improved the rights of working mothers. This striking combination of equality and protectionism for women cannot be credited to the usual sponsors of legislative reform. Instead of relying on one of t...
Article
In this article, we evaluate whether Latin American participation in international arenas reinforces traditional divides betweem state and society in global politics or transforms state-society relations in ways compatible with the concept of global civil society. We examine the particpation and interaction of Latin American nongovernmental organiz...
Article
States vary the content and subject matter of their claims to sovereignty. In an analysis of when states invoked sovereignty at recent UN World Conferences on the environment (1992), human rights (1993), and women (1995), the authors revise and extend Litfin's (1997) notion of bargains among components of sovereignty. At the conferences, states inv...
Article
National agencies for women have engaged the state as advocates of women's rights, taking on issues from reproductive rights to pay equity. Current analysis focuses on both the origins and effectiveness of such agencies. However, such analysis is predominantly based on studies from the developed world. Thus, examination of individual cases from the...
Article
National agencies for women have engaged the state as advocates of women's rights, taking on issues from reproductive rights to pay equity. Current analysis focuses on both the origins and effectiveness of such agencies. However, such analysis is predominantly based on studies from the developed world. Thus, examination of individual cases from the...
Article
Full-text available
The UN world women's conferences - in particular the two most recent ones, held in Nairobi (1985) and Beijing (1995) - have been celebrated as catalysts for the development of a transnational women's movement. But their achievements are less clear when examining their impacts on national organizing. Consideration of the effects of 'transnationalism...
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Full-text available
The increased visibility of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and social movements at the international level invites continuing evaluation of the extent and significance of the role they now play in world politics. While the presence of such new actors is easily demonstrated, international relations scholars have debated their significance. The...

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Project (1)
Project
This collection offers a comparative assessment of the Latin American Left's engagement with feminist, women’s, and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) movements and demands. Focusing on nine national cases - Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela – in which the Left achieved executive, if not legislative, power in the 2000's, the fifteen authors of this volume map, lift up, and contest the contemporary Left’s transformation of gender- and sexuality-based rights through the state. Beyond “an impact of left governance” approach, this book also shows how gender relations and sexuality are fundamental to the political projects of the Latin American Left.