Elisabeth Duursma

Elisabeth Duursma
University of Wollongong | UOW · Faculty of Education

EdD

About

6
Publications
27,876
Reads
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382
Citations
Citations since 2017
0 Research Items
211 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023010203040
2017201820192020202120222023010203040
Additional affiliations
February 2014 - August 2014
Leiden University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
February 2010 - present
University of Groningen
Position
  • Researcher Associate

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
It is well known that reading aloud affects children’s language and literacy development. Little is known though, about fathers reading to their children. This study examined paternal and maternal bookreading frequency among 430 low-income families and investigated whether paternal bookreading and maternal bookreading predicted children’s early lan...
Article
Bookreading has proven to be beneficial for children’s language and literacy development (e.g. Bus, Van Ijzendoorn and Pellegrini, 1995; Fletcher and Reese, 2005; Mol and Bus, 2011a). Families in Western countries are often advised to read to their young children, and many parents appear to be aware of the positive effects of bookreading. However,...
Article
Most research on parental bookreading has focused on mothers reading to their children. This study examined bookreading practices among approximately 800 fathers and mothers in low‐income families. We looked at differences and similarities between families where both parents read frequently compared to families where only mothers read frequently. I...
Article
Full-text available
Reading aloud to young children, particularly in an engaging manner, promotes emergent literacy and language development and supports the relationship between child and parent. In addition it can promote a love for reading which is even more important than improving specific literacy skills.21 When parents hold positive attitudes towards reading, t...
Article
Most studies of parent–child bookreading have focused on mothers reading to their children. Though the role of fathers in children's lives is widely emphasized, we know almost nothing about father–child bookreading, particularly among low-income families. The present study was designed to examine how often low-income fathers report reading to their...
Article
This article describes a series of studies that examine the development of literacy in elementary school Spanish-speaking second-language learners. Findings from the research that addresses our first question-regarding cross-language relationships-indicate that first-language reading skills are related to second-language reading skills, but that ch...

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