Elisa Bandini

Elisa Bandini
University of Tuebingen | EKU Tübingen · Institute for Prehistory and Early History and Medieval Archaeology

About

28
Publications
2,505
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209
Citations
Introduction
Elisa Bandini currently works at the School of Psychology, University of Birmingham & The University of Tübingen, Germany. Elisa carries out research in Cultural Evolution, Cognitive Science, Behavioural Science and Evolutionary Biology with human and non-human primates.

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
Extant primates, especially chimpanzees, are often used as models for pre-modern hominin (henceforth: hominin) behaviour, anatomy and cognition. In particular, as hominin behaviour cannot be inferred from archaeological remains and artefacts alone, extant primates (including modern humans) are used as a ‘time machine’ to reconstruct the technologic...
Article
Full-text available
Nut-cracking with hammer tools (henceforth: nut-cracking) has been argued to be one of the most complex tool-use behaviors observed in nonhuman animals. So far, only chimpanzees, capuchins, and macaques have been observed using tools to crack nuts in the wild (Boesch and Boesch, 1990; Gumert et al., 2009; Mannu and Ottoni, 2009). However, the learn...
Article
Full-text available
Background : Despite substantial research on early hominin lithic technologies, the learning mechanisms underlying flake manufacture and use are contested. To draw phylogenetic inferences on the potential cognitive processes underlying the acquisition of both of these abilities in early hominins, we investigated if and how one of our closest living...
Article
Full-text available
Background : Despite substantial research on early hominin lithic technologies, the learning mechanisms underlying flake manufacture and use are contested. To draw phylogenetic inferences on the potential cognitive processes underlying the acquisition of both of these abilities in early hominins, we investigated if and how one of our closest living...
Article
Full-text available
The critical examination of current hypotheses is one of the key ways in which scientific fields develop and grow. Therefore, any critique, including Haidle and Schlaudt’s article, “Where Does Cumulative Culture Begin? A Plea for a Sociologically Informed Perspective,” represents a welcome addition to the literature. However, critiques must also be...
Article
Full-text available
Animal stone-handling behavior (SH) has been recorded in detail only in primates, mainly across macaque species. The purpose(s) of SH are still unknown, yet various hypotheses have been suggested, including that it is a misdirected behavior when hungry and/or a play behavior that aids individuals' motor and stone tool-use development. SH has also b...
Article
Full-text available
Studies on primate tool-use often involve the use of baseline conditions, as they allow for the examination of any differences in the subjects' behavior before and after the introduction of a tool-use task. While these baseline conditions can be powerful for identifying the relative contributions of individual and social learning for the acquisitio...
Article
Full-text available
The zone of latent solutions (ZLS) hypothesis provides an alternative approach to explaining cultural patterns in primates and many other animals. According to the ZLS hypothesis, non-human great ape (henceforth: ape) cultures consist largely or solely of latent solutions. The current competing (and predominant) hypothesis for ape culture argues in...
Article
Full-text available
The notion that tool-use is unique to humans has long been refuted by the growing number of observations of animals using tools across various contexts. Yet, the mechanisms behind the emergence and sustenance of these tool-use repertoires are still heavily debated. We argue that the current animal behaviour literature is biased towards a social lea...
Article
To support their claim for technical reasoning skills rather than imitation as the key for cumulative technological culture (CTC), Osiurak and Reynaud argue that chimpanzees can imitate mechanical actions, but do not have CTC. They also state that an increase in working memory in human evolution could not have been a key driver of CTC. We discuss w...
Article
Full-text available
Despite major advances in the study of animal tool behaviour, researchers continue to debate how exactly certain behaviours are acquired. While specific mechanisms, such as genetic predispositions or action copying, are sometimes suspected to play a major role in behavioural acquisition, controlled experiments are required to provide conclusive evi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Several species of non-human apes have been suggested to rely on copying to acquire some of their behavioural forms. One of the most cited examples, and UN-protected, is nut-cracking in chimpanzees. However, copying might not be the most parsimonious explanation for nut-cracking, considering the lack of evidence for spontaneous copying in this spec...
Article
Full-text available
The study of innovation in non‐human animals (henceforth: animals) has recently gained momentum across fields including primatology, animal behaviour and cultural evolution. Examining the rate of innovations, and the cognitive mechanisms driving these innovations across species, can provide insights into the evolution of human culture. Especially r...
Article
Full-text available
Nut-cracking is often cited as one of the most complex behaviours observed in wild chimpanzees. However, the cognitive mechanisms behind its acquisition are still debated. The current null hypothesis is that the form of nut-cracking behaviour relies on variants of social learning, with some researchers arguing, more precisely, that copying variants...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies investigating culture in nonhuman animals tend to focus on the inferred need of social learning mechanisms that transmit the form of a behavior to explain the population differences observed in wild animal behavioral repertoires. This research focus often results in studies overlooking the possibility of individuals being able to devel...
Chapter
In 2009, Tennie et al. proposed the theory of the Zone of Latent Solutions (ZLS), defined as the range of behaviors (solutions) an individual of a species can invent independently, i.e., which it can acquire without any form of social learning. By definition, species limited to their ZLS are unable to innovate and/or transmit behavioral traits outs...
Article
Full-text available
A subspecies of long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis aurea; Mfa) has been reported to use stone tools and a specific technique to process nuts in Southeast Asia, a behaviour known as ‘pound-hammering’. The aim of this study was to examine the development of pound-hammering in long-tailed macaques: whether this behavioural form can be individua...
Article
Full-text available
Modern human technological culture depends on social learning. A widespread assumption for chimpanzee tool-use cultures is that they, too, are dependent on social learning. However, we provide evidence to suggest that individual learning, rather than social learning, is the driver behind determining the form of these behaviours within and across in...
Data
Data on Subjects in Group 2
Data
Side technique LO using the side technique (camera stills by EB).
Data
Scooping action Video clip of HO scooping the bread (video by EB).
Data
Stick modification Stick modification process by HO (camera stills by EB).
Data
Data on Subjects in Group 1
Data
Subject’s previous tool-use experience
Poster
Latent Solutions experiment testing marrow picking in culturally unconnected, captive, non-human great apes.
Poster
Latent Solutions experiment testing for algae scooping in culturally unconnected, captive, non-human great apes.

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