Elina Rubertus

Elina Rubertus
Universität Potsdam · Department Linguistik

M.Sc. (Clinical & Experimental Linguistics)

About

27
Publications
5,581
Reads
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139
Citations
Citations since 2017
18 Research Items
138 Citations
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Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the development of spoken language in young children has become increasingly important for advancing basic theories of language acquisition and for clinical practice. However, such a goal requires refined measurements of speech articulation (e.g., from the tongue), which are difficult to obtain from young children. In recent years tho...
Article
Full-text available
This study is the first to use kinematic data to assess lingual carryover coarticulation in children. We investigated whether the developmental decrease previously attested in anticipatory coarticulation, as well as the relation between coarticulatory degree and the consonantal context, also characterize carryover coarticulation. Sixty-two children...
Article
Full-text available
This study is the first to use kinematic data to assess lingual carryover coarticulation in children. We investigated whether the developmental decrease previously attested in anticipatory coarticulation, as well as the relation between coarticulatory degree and the consonantal context, also characterize carryover coarticulation. Sixty-two children...
Article
Full-text available
The development of phonological awareness, the knowledge of the structural combinatoriality of a language, has been widely investigated in relation to reading (dis)ability across languages. However, the extent to which knowledge of phonemic units may interact with spoken language organization in (transparent) alphabetical languages has hardly been...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the development of spoken language in young children has become increasingly important for advancing basic theories of language acquisition and for clinical practice. However, such a goal requires refined measurements of speech articulation (e.g., from the tongue), which are difficult to obtain from young children. In recent years tho...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the temporal organization of vocalic anticipation in German children from 3 to 7 years of age and adults. The main objective was to test for non-linear processes in vocalic anticipation, which may result from the interaction between lingual gestural goals for individual vowels, and those for their neighbors over time. The techn...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract The development of phonological awareness, the knowledge of the structural combinatoriality of a language, has been widely investigated in relation to its predictive role for reading (dis)ability across languages. However, few studies have investigated to what extent phonological awareness may affect spoken language organization, which in...
Preprint
Full-text available
The development of phonological awareness, the knowledge of the structural combinatoriality of a language, has been widely investigated in relation to reading (dis)ability across languages. However, the extent to which knowledge of phonemic units may interact with spoken language organization in (transparent) alphabetical languages, has hardly been...
Article
Full-text available
In the first years of life, children differ greatly from adults in the temporal organization of their speech gestures in fluent language production. However, dissent remains as to the maturational direction of such organization. The present study sheds new light on this process by tracking the development of anticipatory vowel-to-vowel coarticulati...
Data
Summary of the number of analyzed trials per consonant context per age cohort. Cohort abbreviations are C3–3-year-old children, C4–4-year-old children, C5–5-year-old children, C7–7-year-old children, and A—adults. (DOCX)
Data
Ultrasound data. Raw ultrasound image of a 5-year-old boy’s tongue (CM5_005) at the temporal midpoint of the articulation of an [e] on the left and the semi-automatically labeled surface contour on top of the same frame on the right side. The tip of the tongue is to the left in both images. (DOCX)
Data
Model output for the vowel’s effect on schwa in every consonant context for each cohort. Cohort abbreviations are C3–3-year-old children, C4–4-year-old children, C5–5-year-old children, C7–7-year-old children, and A—adults. (DOCX)
Data
Measures of the horizontal position of the highest point on the tongue dorsum. Column description: SUBJECT—Participant ID (Cohort abbreviation, F—female, M—male, T (in 7-year-olds only: typically developing)), BLOCK—Number of block the word was recorded in, TRIAL—trial number, WORD—stimulus word, CONSONANT1 –C1 in /aɪnə C1VC2ə/, CONSONANT2 –C2 in /...
Article
Full-text available
(in press; excerpt from a non final abstract due to copyright restriction) This study reports on a cross-sectional investigation of lingual coarticulation in 57 typically developing German children (four cohorts from 3.5 to 7 years of age) as compared with 12 adults. It examines whether the organization of lingual gestures for intrasyllabic coartic...
Data
Purpose: This study reports on a cross-sectional investigation of lingual coarticulation in 57 typically developing German children (four cohorts from 3.5 to 7 years of age) as compared with 12 adults. It examines whether the organization of lingual gestures for intrasyllabic coarticulation differs as a function of age and consonantal context. Meth...
Research
Full-text available
This supplement contains the abstracts of the eighth edition of Ultrafest, which was held in Potsdam, Germany, October 4 – 6, 2017. Ultrafest is an international meeting gathering scientists, speech and language pathologists, engineers and students all working with ultrasound imaging technique for linguistic investigations.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Tongue movements for speech segments vary depending on their phonetic context. For adults, it has been shown that these coarticulatory effects do not only occur between adjacent segments but can span several segments in both the anticipatory and carryover direction. Moreover, especially the two directions of vowel-to-vowel (V-to-V) coarticulation a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In the domain of spoken language acquisition, a large body of empirical research has focused on coarticulation mechanism, which regards the binding of articulatory gestures for neighboring phonemes. Coarticulation is an important mechanism to investigate as it engages multiple speech articulators (e.g., the lips, the tongue) whose actions must be f...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study investigates lingual V-to-V anticipatory coarticula-tion in German preschoolers and adults using ultrasound measures. In light of conflicting results in the literature, the aim was to study effects in large cohorts and with a widespread set of vowels. Results provide evidence for V-to-V coarticulation in children as well as adults, indep...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In adults, the production of word pairs that are not identical but share similar phonemes or phoneme sequences (e.g. top cop versus top top) are produced less accurately and more slowly than identical or dissimilar pairs (Butterworth & Whittacker 1980; Sevald & Dell 1994). This has been attributed to competition in planning and executing similar ar...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
While the maturation of speech production abilities has been well documented in the past decades, little is known about the temporal organization of the articulatory processes occurring during speech planning. In this study, we tested seven 8 to 10 year-old speakers of American English as well as four adults for comparison. We employed a delayed pi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The present study investigates the development of coarticulation in German children between 3 and 7 years of age. To quantify coarticulation degree, we will not only apply the commonly used method of Locus Equations (LE) on the acoustic signal, but also on the articulation recorded with ultrasound, which so far has been rarely done in children (Noi...
Poster
Full-text available
This study investigates effects of lexical and sublexical properties on the temporal organization of children’s real word production. In adults, structural, frequency, and probabilistic characteristics of words have been shown to influence word production both at the planning (prior internal organization) and the articulation stage (actual producti...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study investigates effects of lexical and sublexical properties on the temporal organization of children's real word production. In adults, structural, frequency, and probabilistic characteristics of words have been shown to influence word production both at the planning (prior internal organization) and the articulation stage (actual producti...
Poster
Full-text available
The study aims to investigate the development of coarticulation in 5-year old German children. The main goal was to examine the way different aspects of consonant production vary on a quantitative coarticulation -invariance scale as a function of age. To achieve this goal, we employed Mutual Information (MI), a method that has been used to measure...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Archived project
We are pleased to announce that Ultrafest VIII, the 8th meeting of researchers interested in ultrasound imaging for linguistic investigation will take place October 4th to 6th 2017 in Potsdam, the former residence of the Prussian kings and the German emperor (just outside Berlin, Germany). In the past decade, ultrasound imaging has become a popular method for studying language and speech. It has advanced our understanding of the articulatory mechanisms from which speech signals originate and contributed to creating an interface between phonology, phonetics and biology. It has inspired new research avenues, making articulatory recordings feasible in sensitive populations such as children, clinical groups or speakers living in remote areas. Given the growing number of ultrasound studies published in peer-reviewed journals, it is now unquestionable that ultrasound has transformed the field of language and speech, not only by introducing new methodological possibilities but also by paving the way for new theoretical questions to be addressed. Following up on a great scientific meeting, Ultrafest VII, hosted by Diana Archangeli and Jonathan Yip in Hong Kong in 2015, we hope to gather the ultrasound community again at Ultrafest VIII. ** Important information: - We are delighted to have two prolific guest speakers: Marianne Pouplier (LMU, Munich, Germany) and Khalil Iskarous (USC, Los Angeles, USA). - Deadline for 1-page abstract submission: April, 21st, 2017 - Notification of acceptance: May, 31st, 2017 The Ultrafest VIII team (University of Potsdam, http://www.uni-potsdam.de/lola) For any question, please send to: ultrafest8@uni-potsdam.de
Archived project
This project investigates effects of structural, frequency, and probabilistic properties of the ambient language on the temporal organization of real words in children, from the planning stage (internal organization of the phonological and articulatory processes) to the actual execution of the plan in speech. We have conducted a first investigation with German preschoolers as well as with English school-aged children. Capitalizing on our findings and experience with the methodological design, we aim at pursuing this research and determine how those effects may change with increasing language practice.
Project
SOLLAR is a customized platform used for the collection of both tongue and lip motion during speech tasks in young children. It combines tracking of the tongue and the lips via ultrasound and video imaging as well as acoustic recording of the speech signal. It integrates a head/probe movement correction procedure and allow for expressing tongue motion in a head-centric coordinate system. The platform is currently used (and optimised) in several projects with (a)typically developing preschoolers, school-aged children as well as with adults.