Elic Weitzel

Elic Weitzel
University of Connecticut | UConn · Department of Anthropology

MS, Anthropology

About

21
Publications
2,336
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121
Citations
Citations since 2017
13 Research Items
119 Citations
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Introduction
Human evolutionary ecologist interested in the population and behavioral ecology of humans, past and present

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
The transition to agriculture is one of the most significant events in human prehistory; yet, explaining why people initially domesticated plants and animals remains a contentious research problem in archaeology. Two competing hypotheses dominate current debates. The first draws on niche construction theory to emphasize how intentional management o...
Article
Full-text available
Historical ecology has revolutionized our understanding of fisheries and cultural landscapes, demonstrating the value of historical data for evaluating the past, present, and future of Earth’s ecosystems. Despite several important studies, Indigenous fisheries generally receive less attention from scholars and managers than the 17th–20th century ca...
Article
Resource depression – a decline in encounter rates with prey due to the actions of a predator – has been documented for numerous species in North America. Yet it is not fully understood whether white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), the most common prey species for Native peoples in eastern North America, were depressed prior to European colon...
Article
Human populations distribute themselves across landscapes in clearly patterned ways, but accurate and theoretically informed predictions and explanations of that patterning in the archaeological record can prove difficult. Recently, archaeologists have begun applying a unifying theoretical framework derived from population and behavioural ecology t...
Article
Recent research emphasises the importance of both within-group cooperation and between-group competition for human sociality, past and present. We hypothesise that the shift from foraging to food production in eastern North America provided novel socioecological conditions that impacted interpersonal and intergroup interactions in the region, inspi...
Article
Recently, researchers investigating the origins of domestication have debated the significance of resource intensification in the shift from foraging to food production. In eastern North America, one of several independent centers of domestication, this question remains open. To determine whether initial domestication may have been preceded by inte...
Preprint
Recently, researchers investigating the origins of domestication have debated the significance of resource intensification in the shift from foraging to food production. In eastern North America, one of several independent centers of domestication, this question remains open. To determine whether initial domestication may have been preceded by inte...
Article
Full-text available
Dozens of large mammals such as mammoth and mastodon disappeared in North America at the end of the Pleistocene with climate change and “overkill” by human hunters the most widely-argued causes. However, the population dynamics of humans and megafauna preceding extinctions have received little attention even though such information may be telling a...
Data
Text S1: A series of simulations using idealized population data that was randomly sampled to represent radiocarbon dates in order to validate the methodological approach used in this paper.
Data
Dataset S1. Data of corrected and observed summed probability distributions (SPDs), site counts, and generalized additive model (GAM) fits per 100 year intervals from 0–15,000 cal BP.
Data
Figure S1. Kernel density summed probability distribution (SPD) plots with 95% confidence intervals following the Sheather-Jones method (60) of calibrated median radiocarbon dates for raw and taphonomically corrected (52) dates.
Data
Figure S3. Relative population density from a calibrated but not taphonomically corrected (52) summed probability distribution of radiocarbon dates through time fit with a generalized additive model (GAM). The plot illustrates the model fit with confidence intervals and is color coded to indicate significant (a=0.01) periods of increase (blue) and...
Data
Figure S2. Unadjusted residuals for each 100 year interval showing the difference between values of the summed probability distributions (SPDs) and the fitted values of the generalized additive models (GAMs) for observed and taphonomically corrected radiocarbon dates. GAM fits are less accurate from 0–1,000 cal BP given the high rate of change in t...
Data
Figure S4. Relative population density from a calibrated and taphonomically corrected (52) summed probability distribution (SPD) of site counts through time fit with a generalized additive model (GAM). The plot illustrates the model fit with confidence intervals and is color coded to indicate significant (a=0.01) periods of increase (blue) and decr...
Data
Figure S5. Relative population density from a calibrated but not taphonomically corrected (52) summed probability distribution (SPD) of site counts through time fit with a generalized additive model (GAM). The plot illustrates the model fit with confidence intervals and is color coded to indicate significant (a=0.01) periods of increase (blue) and...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
This volume, edited by Tanya M. Peres and Aaron Deter-Wolf, brings together archaeological evidence of the cultural significance of foods, dishes, meals, cooking technology, and culinary tools spanning 14,000 years of prehistory in the American Southeast.