Eleni Dalaka

Eleni Dalaka
IBEC Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia | IBEC · Integrative cell and tissue dynamics group

PhD in Physics - University of St Andrews
Postdoctoral Researcher at IBEC

About

10
Publications
522
Reads
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24
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2021 - present
IBEC Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2017 - December 2018
University of St Andrews
Position
  • Lab Demonstrator
June 2016 - June 2020
University of St Andrews
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
June 2016 - June 2020
University of St Andrews
Field of study
  • Physics
September 2010 - October 2015
National Technical University of Athens
Field of study
  • Applied Mathematical and Physical Sciences

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Important dynamic processes in mechanobiology remain elusive due to a lack of tools to image the small cellular forces at play with sufficient speed and throughput. Here, we introduce a fast, interference-based force imaging method that uses the illumination of an elastic deformable microcavity with two rapidly alternating wavelengths to map forces...
Article
Full-text available
Mechanobiology plays a prominent role in cancer invasion and metastasis. The ability of a cancer to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) is likely connected to its invasiveness. Many cancer cells form invadopodia—micrometer-sized cellular protrusions that promote invasion through matrix degradation (proteolysis). Although it has been hypothesized tha...
Presentation
Mechanical forces exerted by cells are known to regulate many cellular functions, with cell invasion and metastasis being of particular importance in cancer. This study uses Elastic Resonator Interference Stress Microscopy (ERISM), a novel optical technique for force mapping, to measure – to our knowledge for the first time – the forces exerted by...
Presentation
Cancer invasion and metastasis are complex processes, regulated by biochemical as well as physical cues. Understanding and quantifying the physical cues in a better way could lead to new therapeutic strategies against cancer invasion. This study uses Elastic Resonator Interference Stress Microscopy (ERISM), a novel optical technique for force mappi...
Presentation
The mechanical forces exerted by invadopodia have been measured using the Elastic Resonator Interference Stress Microscopy (ERISM) technique. Invadopodia are protrusions formed by cancer cell that enhance cancer invasion via degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM). The extreme stress sensitivity and the fast response of ERISM enabled us to measur...
Poster
This study uses Elastic Resonator Interference Stress Microscopy (ERISM), a novel interferometric technique for force mapping, with high spatial resolution and extreme pressure sensitivity, to measure invadopodia forces. ERISM relies on light interference to image the deformation of an ultra-soft optical microcavity and therefore the mechanical pre...
Presentation
Full-text available
The ability to monitor mechanical forces applied by cells is crucial to advance our understanding of a range of fundamental biological processes. Today, various biophysical techniques exist to investigate different types of interactions between cells and the substratum they adhere to (e.g. Traction Force Microscopy), each having a specific set of a...
Poster
Mechanical cellular forces are known to regulate many biological processes such as cell motility and migration as well as invasion and metastasis. However, cell force measurements are challenging due to the weak nature of these forces. In this study, we used Elastic Resonator Interference Stress Microscopy (ERISM), a novel and precise optical techn...
Poster
Optical trapping is a non-contact tool that enables the manipulation of small particles, with many applications in biology, medicine and chemistry. In optical trapping, the momentum of light is transferred to the particle and optical forces are exerted to it, resulting in its immobilisation. The optical forces are in the pico-Newton range and the s...

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