Elena Luchkina

Elena Luchkina
Northwestern University | NU

PhD in Cognitive Science

About

15
Publications
1,295
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
52
Citations
Citations since 2016
14 Research Items
51 Citations
201620172018201920202021202202468101214
201620172018201920202021202202468101214
201620172018201920202021202202468101214
201620172018201920202021202202468101214
Introduction
Elena Luchkina completed her PhD at at the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic and Psychological Sciences, Brown University. She currently works Northwestern University. Elena does research on the development of symbolic communication.

Publications

Publications (15)
Preprint
Full-text available
The present studies examined relative contributions of different mechanisms underlying children's selective word learning. Experiment 1 tested 3-4-year-olds' learning of novel labels provided by informants who established their (in)accuracy by asking questions about familiar objects and mentioning correct or incorrect labels, and subsequently label...
Preprint
Human language permits us to call to mind objects, events, and ideas that we cannot witness directly. We learn and reason about people we have never met, about time that hasn’t yet passed, and about abstract concepts, such as justice or abelian groups. We readily communicate about such phenomena, learn new information about them, and when (and if)...
Preprint
The ability to learn from verbal testimony increases exponentially our communicative and representational reach, permitting us to learn, reason and communicate about objects and events that are not perceptually available. But it remains less clear is what capacities give rise to our ability to learn from verbal information alone. We propose that th...
Preprint
Human language permits us to call to mind objects, events, and ideas that we cannot witness directly. This capacity requires that one links words not only to their referents, but to mental representations of those referents. Together with the recognition that words are used intentionally for communication, this link constitutes ‘verbal reference.’...
Article
Full-text available
Verbal reference is the ability to use language to communicate about objects, events, or ideas, even if they are not witnessed directly, such as past events or faraway places. It rests on a three-way link between words, their referents, and mental representations of those referents. A foundational human capacity, verbal reference extends the commun...
Article
Full-text available
In the first year of life, infants' word learning is slow, laborious, and requires repeated exposure to word-referent co-occurrences. In contrast, by 14-18 months, infants learn words from just a few labeling events, use joint attention and eye gaze to decipher word meaning, and begin to use speech to communicate about absent things. We propose tha...
Article
Full-text available
Human language permits us to call to mind objects, events, and ideas that we cannot witness directly. This capacity rests upon abstract verbal reference: the appreciation that words are linked to mental representations that can be established, retrieved and modified, even when the entities to which a word refers is perceptually unavailable. Althoug...
Preprint
In the first year of life, infants’ word learning is slow, laborious, and requires long, repeated exposure to word-referent co-occurrences. In contrast, by 14-18 months, infants learn words from just a few labeling events, use joint attention and eye-gaze to decipher word meaning, and begin to use speech to communicate about absent things. We propo...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined how inferences about epistemic competence and generalized labeling errors influence children’s selective word learning. Three‐ to 4‐year‐olds (N = 128) learned words from informants who asked questions about objects, mentioning either correct or incorrect labels. Such questions do not convey stark differences in informants’ epis...
Preprint
A nascent understanding of absent reference emerges around 12 months: provided with rich contextual support, infants look and point to the location of a displaced object. When can infants understand absent reference without contextual support? Using a procedure modified from Hendrickson and Sundara (2017), 13- and 16-month-olds first listened to ut...
Chapter
Word learning is a social act. Because there is an arbitrary relation between words and their meaning, children must learn words from other people. Other people, however, are not always reliable sources of knowledge. People can be ignorant, hold false beliefs, or simply be deceptive. How do children evaluate the reliability of sources of knowledge...
Article
Children use speakers' past accuracy to make inferences about novel word meanings those individuals provide in the future. An open question is whether children can retrospectively reevaluate information after learning that the source was inaccurate. We addressed this question in two experiments where a speaker first introduced labels for novel obje...
Preprint
Full-text available
The present studies examine whether and how 18-month-olds use informants’ accuracy to acquire novel labels for novel objects and generalize them to a new context. In Experiment 1, two speakers made statements about the labels of familiar objects. One used accurate labels and the other used inaccurate labels. One of these speakers then introduced no...
Article
Full-text available
Do children use causal data and social information in conjunction to guide their interventions? We examined whether 2-year-olds (N = 120, 40 in each experiment) were able to appreciate the difference between causally efficacious and inefficacious actions presented intentionally. Toddlers who did appreciate such a difference preferentially used inte...

Network

Cited By