Eleanor Warren-Thomas

Eleanor Warren-Thomas
Bangor University · School of Natural Sciences

PhD

About

19
Publications
13,239
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500
Citations
Introduction
I'm a research scientist interested in biodiversity and environmental conservation, particularly in the tropics. I completed my PhD at the University of East Anglia, UK, worked as a Research Associate with Professor Jane Hill at the University of York, and am currently a NERC-IIASA Research Fellow at Bangor University, Wales, UK.
Additional affiliations
June 2020 - present
Bangor University
Position
  • Fellow
September 2019 - May 2020
UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
Position
  • Research Associate
October 2017 - September 2019
The University of York
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
October 2013 - October 2017
October 2010 - September 2011
University College London
Field of study
  • MSc Conservation
October 2007 - June 2010
University of Oxford
Field of study
  • BA Biological Sciences

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Strong international demand for natural rubber is driving expansion of industrial-scale and smallholder monoculture plantations, with >2 million ha established during the last decade. Mainland Southeast Asia and Southwest China represent the epicentre of rapid rubber expansion; here we review impacts on forest ecosystems and biodiversity. We estima...
Article
Full-text available
Expansion of Hevea brasiliensis rubber plantations is a resurgent driver of deforestation, carbon emissions, and biodiversity loss in Southeast Asia. Southeast Asian rubber extent is massive, equivalent to 67% of oil palm, with rapid further expansion predicted. Results-based carbon finance could dis-incentivise forest conversion to rubber, but eff...
Article
Full-text available
Monocultural rubber plantations have replaced tropical forest, causing biodiversity loss. While protecting intact or semi‐intact biodiverse forest is paramount, improving biodiversity value within the 11.4 million hectares of existing rubber plantations could offer important conservation benefits, if yields are also maintained. Some farmers practic...
Article
Full-text available
The Indonesian government committed to restoring over 2 million ha of degraded peatland by the end of 2020, mainly to reduce peat fires and greenhouse gas emissions. Although it is unlikely the government will meet this target, restoration projects are still underway. One restoration strategy involves blocking peatland drainage canals, but the cons...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological restoration is considered to play an important role in mitigating climate change, protecting biodiversity and preventing environmental degradation. Yet, there are often multiple perspectives on what outcomes restoration should be aiming to achieve, and how we should get to that point. In this paper we interview a range of policy makers,...
Article
Full-text available
Rubber plantations are widespread in mainland South-east Asia. Intensive monocultural rubber cultivation practices predominate, which negatively impact biodiversity. Some plantations are managed as high-yielding agroforests, where the integration of fruit trees and other plant species marginally enhances crop diversity relative to monocultures, pro...
Article
1. The recent availability of high spatial and temporal resolution optical and radar satellite imagery has dramatically increased opportunities for mapping land cover at fine scales. Fusion of optical and radar images has been found useful in tropical areas affected by cloud cover because of their complementarity. However, the multitemporal dimensi...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Following the near‐complete destruction of China's forest ecosystems during the 20th century, recent reforestation programmes have created large‐scale mosaics of protected secondary and plantation forests. These restored forests are often assumed to have limited biodiversity conservation value, but large‐scale evaluations of their diversity are...
Article
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The loss of huge areas of peat swamp forest in Southeast Asia and the resulting negative environmental effects, both local and global, have led to an increasing interest in peat restoration in the region. Satellite remote sensing offers the potential to provide up-to-date information on peat swamp forest loss across large areas, and support spatial...
Article
Full-text available
To date, the spatial distribution pattern and density of Brazil nut trees in logged forest stands is unclear across the Amazon basin. We asked the following questions: (1) What are the densities and spatial distributions of Brazil nut juveniles (10 ≤ dbh < 40 cm) and adults (≥ 40 cm dbh) in three selectively logged Brazil nut concessions (1413 ha s...
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Although many examples of multiple-use forest management may be found in tropical smallholder systems, few studies provide empirical support for the integration of selective timber harvesting with non-timber forest product (NTFP) extraction. Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa, Lecythidaceae) is one of the world's most economically-important NTFP spec...
Article
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Plantation and secondary forests form increasingly important components of the global forest cover, but our current knowledge about their potential contribution to biodiversity conservation is limited. We surveyed understory plant and carabid species assemblages at three distinct regions in temperate northeastern China, dominated by mature forest (...
Article
Full-text available
Mature forests have been almost completely destroyed in China’s northern regions, but this has been followed by large-scale reforestation in the wake of environmental degradation. Although future forest plantations are expected to expand over millions of hectares, knowledge about the ecology and biodiversity of China’s replanted forests remains ver...
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Floating meadows are often associated with Amazonian white-water flooded forests (varzea), where they grow between the tree line and open-water. Seasonal flooding in varzea results in an unstable forest floor for terrestrial species. However, floating meadows may offer a refuge for some species that would otherwise be displaced by rising water. Flo...
Article
Full-text available
Amphibian declines are a pressing global concern. The lowland rainforests of the south-eastern Amazon harbour exceptionally high amphibian diversity, but also face a range of threats includ-ing habitat modification caused by forest fires. In this study, we sampled amphibians in areas of forest in Madre de Dios, Peru, that were affected by anthropog...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
In our research, we analyse the species richness and composition of plant and insect assemblages in the temperate forests of northern and northeastern China. In our studies, we identify environmental determinants for the observed diversity patterns, and we compare assemblages in forest plantations, secondary forests and mature forest remnants. The investigations consider patterns in species richness, traits as well as phylogenetic patterns.