Eleanor Cornelius

Eleanor Cornelius
University of Johannesburg | uj · Department of Languages, Cultural Studies and Applied Linguistics (LanCSAL)

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About

24
Publications
5,390
Reads
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48
Citations
Introduction
Eleanor Cornelius is a full professor in the Department of Languages, Cultural Studies and Applied Linguistics at the University of Johannesburg. Eleanor does research in interpreting, (legal) translation, risk management in translation, plain language and legal language (the language of the law). She currently works on two projects: risk management in translation, and strategies for developing interpreting terminology in indigenous languages in South Africa, most notably Northern Sotho.
Additional affiliations
January 2008 - present
University of Johannesburg
Position
  • Senior Lecturer and Head of Department
January 2001 - December 2007
University of Johannesburg
Position
  • Coordinator: Extended degree programmes
September 1999 - December 2001
Pan South African Language Board (PANSALB)
Position
  • Deputy Director: Language Development
Education
January 2008 - October 2012
University of Johannesburg
Field of study
  • Humanities: Applied Linguistics
January 1993 - December 1994
Stellenbosch University
Field of study
  • Humanities
January 1987 - December 1987
Stellenbosch University
Field of study
  • Education

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
Defining the concept ‘plain language’ has been hugely problematic since the origins of the so-called Plain Language Movement in the 1970s in the United States and elsewhere in the world. Definitions of ‘plain language’ abound, yet James (2008: 6) warns, in relation to plain language practitioners, that “we can’t yet call ourselves a coherent field,...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores the nature and scope of legal translation which is an under-researched area in South Africa. In this article the author predicts that the demand for competent legal translators will increase in the future, evidenced by a recent call by the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD), inviting applications for...
Article
Full-text available
Plain language is a form of intra-lingual translation, a process during which particular interventions are brought to bear on a complex text, such as an act, in order to fit the linguistic competence of a particular target audience (Bhatia, 1983; 1993). In this way, complicated content is unlocked and meaning mediated. The aim is to cut down on the...
Article
Full-text available
Since the inception of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), much has been done to professionalize interpreting in South Africa in terms of accreditation, training and research. Yet two incidents in particular, namely the memorial service of the late President Nelson Mandela and the Oscar Pistorius trial highlighted the gap between theory...
Book
Full-text available
Plain Language: An overview The position of the Afrikaans language is, and has been for a long time, particularly since 1994, rather precarious. The transformation of the national language policy and the concomitant abolishment of the bilingual dispensation in favour of a language policy that afforded official status to eleven languages, resulted...
Article
Full-text available
Ample psycholinguistic research has been done into the activation of the mental lexicon of the bilingual person and especially whether this activation is language selective (when only the language in use is activated, whilst the other language is completely deactivated) or language nonselective (when the language not in use is not completely deacti...
Article
Full-text available
Cornelius and Pienaar (2017) point out that there is a need for standardised interpreting terminology in South Africa, not only in the indigenous languages, but also in English and Afrikaans. In order to bridge this gap and to contribute to the standardisation of interpreting terminology, these authors decided to translate the 2008 publication by S...
Book
Based on the Dutch 2008 publication, 'Terminologie van het tolken', and with the express consent of the original compilers, Heidi Salaets, Winibert Segers and Henry Bloemen, 'Interpreting terminology' is a reference work specifically intended for the South African user. No less than 168 terms on the theory and practice of interpreting are included...
Article
Full-text available
Although much research is currently undertaken on interpreting in South Africa, the profession and academic discourse lack standardised interpreting terminology, especially in the indigenous languages. One possible reason for this relates to the unique South African interpreting context compared to the rest of the world. It is against this backdrop...
Article
Full-text available
The Consumer Protection Act 68 of 2008 (CPA) came into full force in April 2011. An important corollary of this Act, and the National Credit Act 34 of 2005, is the obligation that consumer documents must be in plain language. It has long been debated whether it is possible to make legal documents available in plain language for lay consumption. The...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper describes the QT21 project from the perspective of the International Federation of Translators (FIT) in three main parts. Firstly, six of the ways that humans currently relate with machine translation (MT) systems will be outlined, leading up to a seventh way that will be discussed in more detail. Huge volumes of texts need to be transla...
Chapter
Full-text available
The need for well trained legal translators is increasing globally (Obenaus, 1995; Šarčević, 1997; 2000; Asensio, 2003; Llopis, 2007). This is also true for South Africa, where government received an instruction through a high court ruling in 2010 to publish legislation in the other official South African languages, not only in English. This develo...
Article
Full-text available
Lay readers often experience problems with the peculiarities of legal language, as manifested in legal texts, such as acts of parliament or contracts. The aim of this article is to identify the syntactic properties of Afrikaans legal language that cause processing problems for lay readers of legal texts. To date precious few studies have been condu...
Article
Legal translation is a complex activity which has to date received little attention in South Africa, despite the increasing demand for well-trained legal translators. This article explores the field of legal translation by considering its position in terms of different theoretical models of translation. The relation between (legal) text type and tr...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores the relationships between self-directed learning and aspects of career decision-making. First-year students in access programmes at a South African university participated in the study. Having entered higher education via an alternative route, it was expected that these students would find it difficult to make career decisions...
Article
Full-text available
Opsomming Hierdie artikel het ten doel om die kommentaar van outentieke lesers op 'n bepaalde tipe verbruikersdokument – 'n kredietkaartaansoekvorm – te ontleed en te gebruik vir die herskryf daarvan in gewone Afrikaans. As vertrekpunt dien die bepaling van die Nasionale Kredietwet van 2005 en die Wet op Verbruikersbeskerming van 2008, wat bepaal d...
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis constitutes an investigation into the complexity of Afrikaans legal language and explores the challenges of plain language in South Africa. It argues that language is a powerful tool, which can either be used for inclusion or exclusion. The requirement for the use of plain language as stipulated in the National Credit Act and the Consum...
Article
Full-text available
Language practitioners are generally not trained to compile indexes. In South Africa, the Association for Southern African Indexers and Bibliographers (ASAIB) endeavours to serve the needs of indexers and bibliographers. This article looks at various kinds of indexes and focuses on the importance of understanding the anticipated search strategies o...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
I need literature (or references to literature), and information on controlled language (CL) and controlled language rules. Background: CL is used to manipulate a text to "get rid of" constructions that may pose problems for machine translation. This is done to enhance machine translation quality.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The Consumer Protection Act (CPA) came into full force in April 2011. An important corollary is the provision that consumer documents must be in plain language. Cornelius (2012) suggested that applied linguistics, with its predilection to propose solutions for real world language problems, provides a platform to approach the plain language project, specifically focusing on the banking sector in South Africa. It has long been debated whether it is possible to make complex legal documents available in plain language for lay consumption. The aim of this paper is to investigate the successes and failures of the plain language project five years after the implementation of the CPA. The ways in which three major banks approached the project is investigated by focusing on macro processes and procedures, meso approaches and micro linguistic strategies on text level. This grounded theory study relies on data collected through focus group interviews with bank staff members in both language offices and legal divisions. The ultimate aim is to develop a model for plain language projects for use in all sectors of the economy. Key words: plain language; banking sector; compliance