Elaine Lau

Elaine Lau
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa | UH Manoa · Department of Linguistics

Doctor of Philosophy in Linguistics, University of Hawai'i at Manoa

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11
Publications
3,327
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74
Citations
Citations since 2017
4 Research Items
63 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023051015

Publications

Publications (11)
Thesis
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This dissertation explores the acquisition of Cantonese relative clauses by examining the effects of three factors (the grammatical relation of the relative clause head noun, NP animacy, and the presence of resumptive pronouns) on Cantonese children’s production and comprehension. A prevailing subject preference is observed in both comprehension an...
Conference Paper
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This paper presents the first ever evidence that Cantonese children comprehend passives as early as age three, and suggests that the key factor that leads to the early acquisition of the passive in Cantonese is not the frequency of use in child-directed speech, but the obligatory presence of an explicit oblique agent. The required presence of the o...
Article
Full-text available
Resumptive pronouns are often regarded as a last-resort strategy for rescuing illicit long-distance dependencies. Previous work has demonstrated a facilitative role for resumptive pronouns in production as well as in comprehension, though not a grammatical option in the languages. This study examined whether the same pattern is found in Cantonese,...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Native (L1) speakers take advantage of prenominal cues, such as gender-marked articles and classifiers, to identify an upcoming noun during online processing (e.g., Lew-Williams & Fernald, 2007; Huettig et al., 2010). The extent to which non-native (L2) speakers are able to do so remains a topic of ongoing investigation. Findings from learners of g...
Article
This paper explores how prosodic and syntactic structures correspond in Cantonese. We consider how native speakers disambiguate object relative clauses (ORC, 1a) and main clauses (MC, 1b), which have a surface identity due to the homonymy between the relative clause marker (go2+CL) and the demonstrative go2+CL ‘that’. (1) a. [RC naam4zai2 sek3gan2...
Article
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The question of whether there exists a universal subject preference in relativization has stimulated research in a wide range of languages and across different domains, yielding an extensive body of literature in relative clause acquisition and processing. In this article, we aim at consolidating the efforts of existing research in order to inform...
Article
This study examines long-standing claims that L2 learners rely more on non-grammatical than on grammatical information during sentence processing compared to native speakers. Nominal classifiers in Mandarin Chinese offer an ideal opportunity to test this claim, as they simultaneously encode semantic as well as grammatical form-class cues about co-o...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we describe a form of relative clause in Cantonese which has not previously been described. In a set of relative clauses elicited from children and adults in a production experiment, the head noun has the role of patient. We suggest that these are subject relative clauses involving a form of locative inversion. The aspect marker zyu6...
Article
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Cantonese lyrics are found to adhere to the pitch contours and relative pitch heights of the tones, in or-der to preserve in the lyrics the tonal values of the words. A series of meta-analyses over a selection of Cantonese children’s songs was performed; it investigated (i) the distribution of lexical tones in correlation with musical melody; (ii)...
Thesis
Full-text available
Chinese, as an head-initial language with prenominal relative clauses, is of particular interest to theories of processing and acquisition. Contrary to the subject advantage found in other languages, several theories predict an advantage (for both acquisition and processing) for object-extracted relative clauses (RCs) over subject-extracted RCs in...

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