Elaine Kinsella

Elaine Kinsella
University of Limerick | UL · Department of Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy
Chartered psychologist interested in personal and social influences on health, work and organisations.

About

32
Publications
3,874
Reads
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131
Citations

Publications

Publications (32)
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Department of Health and Social Care has provided the Panel with the main policy commitments made in relation to the health and social care workforce in England. The Panel has agreed that it will evaluate seven commitments across three broad policy areas within its framework for evaluation. The Panel proactively sought the views of a shortliste...
Article
Full-text available
Throughout the Covid-19 pandemic, frontline workers have carried out essential roles to keep society going, while others have been called to minimise the infection rate to limit the burden on frontline workers. In this sense, navigating Covid-19 has necessitated interdependence between frontline workers and key stakeholder groups (such as their col...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Report submitted to the UK Health & Social Care Committee as part of a recent call for evidence titled: Workforce: recruitment, training and retention in health and social care. This report compiles findings from the CV19 Heroes project and recent "Have Your Say" survey undertaken December 2021 to January 2022.
Article
Full-text available
Boredom is a prevalent experience linked to negative psychological and societal outcomes. Building on the notion that sources of meaning in life can mitigate boredom, we examined whether self-compassion would be negatively associated with boredom and if the elevated sense of meaning in life that self-compassion offers could explain this negative as...
Article
Full-text available
Predicting positive psychosocial outcomes following an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) remains a challenge. Considerable research demonstrates that social group memberships can have positive effects on psychological well-being, particularly during life transitions. Social group memberships are argued to help people derive a sense of self. This prospect...
Preprint
Predicting positive psychosocial outcomes following an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) remains a challenge. Considerable research demonstrates that social group memberships can have positive effects on psychological well-being, particularly during life transitions. Social group memberships are argued to help people derive a sense of self. This prospect...
Presentation
Full-text available
Evidence presented at the 29th session of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Coronavirus
Technical Report
Full-text available
Whilst the Covid-19 pandemic moves into a new phase with the successful roll out of vaccines in adults in the UK, there is an opportunity to reflect, re-evaluate, and reconfigure public health responses. Of importance is the need to defend and protect the frontline workforce who have sacrificed so much over the last 18 months. The present essay sum...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Frontline workers have shown extraordinary resilience and sustained efforts since the outbreak of COVID-19. The present study used semi-structured interviews with 38 frontline workers in the UK and Ireland to explore the psychological impact of working through COVID-19. Design: The qualitative data were analysed systematically using them...
Article
Full-text available
The context of Covid-19 has offered an unusual cultural landscape for examining how workers view their own position relative to others, and how individuals respond to prolonged exposure to workplace stress across different sectors and cultures. Through our recent work tracking the well-being of frontline workers in the UK and Ireland (the CV19 Hero...
Presentation
Evidence presentation to the APPG on Coronavirus session 20, 23rd March 2021.
Article
The purpose of this article is to offer an alternative, more nuanced analysis of the labelling of frontline workers as heroes than originally proposed. Here, we argue that the hero narrative in itself need not be problematic, but highlight a number of wider factors that have led to the initial rise (and subsequent fall) in support for labelling fro...
Article
Full-text available
The coronavirus pandemic has necessitated extraordinary human resilience in order to preserve and prolong life and social order. Risks to health and even life are being confronted by workers in health and social care, as well as those in roles previously never defined as "frontline," such as individuals working in community supply chain sectors. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Mortality threats are among the strongest psychological threats that an individual can encounter. Previous research shows that mortality threats lead people to engage in unhealthy compensatory consumption (i.e., overeating), as a maladaptive coping response to threat. In this paper, we propose that reminders of heroes when experiencing mortality th...
Preprint
Full-text available
The coronavirus pandemic has necessitated extraordinary human resilience in order to preserve and prolong life and social order. Risks to health and even life are being confronted by workers in health and social care, as well as those in roles previously never defined as "frontline", such as individuals working in community supply chain sectors. Th...
Research Proposal
Full-text available
Understanding what predicts wellbeing and burnout in those on the frontline of Covid-19 in the UK and Ireland.
Article
Antiheroes are characters that share features with both heroes and villains, typified as selfish and rule-breakers, but who end up doing something good for society. In this research, we examined how priming people with antiheroes (vs. heroes) affected their sensation seeking. We reason that antiheroes (vs. heroes) are more associated with temporall...
Preprint
Full-text available
Moral dumbfounding occurs when people defend a moral judgement even though they cannot provide a reason in support of this judgement. It manifests as an admission of not having reasons, or the use of unsupported declarations (“it’s just wrong”) or tautological reasons (“because it’s incest”) as justifications for a judgment. We test a dual-processe...
Article
Full-text available
Participation in sport and exercise has been linked to enhanced academic performance, and though girls’ participation in sport is known to decline during adolescence, girls continue to outperform boys academically at school in many Western nations. Drawing on evidence that social identities are linked to a range of health and cognitive benefits, we...
Article
Full-text available
There is increasing evidence that identification with social groups can protect and enhance health, establishing a kind of ‘social cure’. However, for those affected by chronic or disabling conditions such as acquired brain injury (ABI), their identity may also represent a burden, a form of ‘social curse’. The present study explored the identity be...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Moral dumbfounding occurs when people defend a moral judgement even though they cannot provide a reason in support of this judgement. It manifests as an admission of not having reasons, or the use of unsupported declarations (“it’s just wrong”) or tautological reasons (“because it’s incest”) as justifications for a judgment. It typically occurs for...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated whether regret predicted the motivation to act heroically. In a series of studies, we examined the relationship between regret, search for meaning in life, and heroism motivation. First, Study 1 (a and b) investigated the association between regret and search for meaning in life, considering regret as a whole, action regret, and ina...
Article
Full-text available
A growing body of research demonstrates the role that social groups play in protecting health and well-being in the context of adjusting to acquired brain injury (ABI). However, the psychological processes that underpin this relationship are less well understood. The present research extends this work by testing a theoretically derived model about...
Article
Full-text available
Few studies have investigated the role of disenfranchisement and denial of agency in women’s sexual health. To address this, a cross-sectional study of disenfranchisement, control (general and reproductive control) and health was conducted in Ireland, where abortion is severely restricted. Multiple mediation models (N = 513 women) indicated that ge...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
To track the welfare of frontline workers in the UK and Ireland during the Covid-19 pandemic.