Eivind N. Støren

Eivind N. Støren
University of Bergen | UiB · Department of Earth Science

PhD

About

49
Publications
11,319
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515
Citations
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August 2011 - August 2014
University of Bergen
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how the Viking societies were impacted by past climate variability and how they adapted to it has hardly been investigated. Here, we have carried out a new multi-proxy investigation of lake sediments, including geochemical and palynological analyses, to reconstruct past changes in temperature and agricultural practices of pre-Viking a...
Article
Full-text available
Lake sediments are a valuable archive to document past flood occurrence and magnitude, and their evolution over centuries to millennia. This information has the potential to greatly improve current flood design and risk assessment approaches, which are hampered by the shortness and scarcity of gauge records. For this reason, paleoflood hydrology fr...
Article
Full-text available
Lake sediments are a valuable archive to document past flood occurrence and magnitude, and their evolution over centuries to millennia. This information has the potential to greatly im-prove current flood design and risk assessment approaches, which are hampered by the shortness and scarcity of gauge records. For this reason, paleoflood hydrology f...
Article
Uncovering anthropogenic and environmental drivers behind past biological change requires integrated analyses of long-term records from a diversity of disciplines. We applied an interdisciplinary approach exploring effects of human land-use and environmental changes on vegetation dynamics at Lake Ljøgottjern in southeastern Norway during the Holoce...
Article
Full-text available
Sedimentary ice‐rafted debris (IRD) provides critical information about the climate sensitivity and dynamics of ice sheets. In recent decades, high‐resolution investigations have revelated ice rafting events in response to rapid warming: such reconstructions help us constrain the near‐future stability of our planet's fast‐changing cryosphere. Howev...
Article
Full-text available
Rock falls and landslides plunging into lakes or small reservoirs can result in tsunamis with extreme wave run-ups. The occurrence of these natural hazards in populated areas have encouraged a recent sharp increase of studies that aim to mitigate their impact on human lives and assess infrastructure lost. This paper amalgamates in a novel fashion a...
Article
Volcanic ash (tephra) horizons represent powerful chronological and stratigraphic markers: rapid and widespread deposition allows for correlation of geological records in time and space. Recent analytical advances enable identification of invisible ash (cryptotephra) up to thousands of kilometers from its volcanic source. This momentum has greatly...
Article
Full-text available
The Glomma River is the largest in Norway, with a catchment area of 154 450 km2. People living near the shores of this river are frequently exposed to destructive floods that impair local cities and communities. Unfortunately, design flood predictions are hampered by uncertainty since the standard flood records are much shorter than the requested r...
Article
Full-text available
While it is well known that the notochord of bony fishes changes over developmental time, less is known about how it varies across different body regions. In the development of the Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., cranial and caudal ends of the notochord are overlaid by the formation of the bony elements of the neurocranium and caudal fin, respecti...
Article
Full-text available
To improve knowledge of marine-terminating glaciers in western Greenland, marine sediment cores from the Ata Sund fjord system, hosting two outlet glaciers, Eqip Sermia and Kangilerngata Sermia, were investigated. The main objective was to reconstruct glacial activity and paleoceanographic conditions during the past 600 years. Ice-rafted debris (IR...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Glomma river is the largest in Norway with a catchment area of 154 450 km2. People living near the shores of this river are frequently exposed to destructive floods that impair local cities and communities. Unfortunately, design flood predictions are hampered by uncertainty since the standard flood records are much shorter than the requested re...
Article
Full-text available
Lake sediments can retain imprints of past floods, enabling reconstructions that span well beyond instrumental time series. Time series covering thousands of years can document the natural range of flood variability, which is critical for understanding the potential causality between changing flood patterns and climate. Here, we analyzed sediments...
Preprint
Full-text available
Up to now, no geochemical or geochronological data has been published about Holocene volcanic activity on the Kerguelen Archipelago. Here we present the first continuous Holocene chronology of volcanic eruptions on the archipelago. We compared sedimentological, geochronological and geochemical data from two lake sediment cores taken in two differen...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Here we present the first Holocene-long continuous chronology of volcanic eruptions on Kerguelen archipelago, where no evidence of Holocene volcanic activity has been published so far. Our chronicle is based upon sedimentological, chronological and geochemical data form two sediment cores, taken in two different depocenters of a large lake, Lake Ar...
Article
The volcanic origins, primarily basaltic, of most of the surface material in Iceland influences its physical properties and appearance. Size distributions, shape analyses and melting experiments were made for surface material collected in high‐erosion dust source areas and fresh volcanic ash deposits to determine whether they differ from one anothe...
Article
Full-text available
New time series of long-term hydroclimate variability in the Arctic are urgently needed in order to better understand the response patterns to external forcing and changes in boundary conditions for global climate models. Here, we present a high-resolution record of mass-wasting events based on analyses of sediments deposited in Lake Svartvatnet. B...
Article
Full-text available
A sudden release of large volumes of water during a glacier outburst flood (GLOF) is a major hazard worldwide. Here, we identify the sedimentary signature of glacial and non‐glacial processes, including GLOFs, based on lacustrine sediments from the distal glacier‐fed Lake Buarvatnet in western Norway. Historically documented GLOFs in 2002 CE and du...
Article
Full-text available
Flommer er blant Norges mest ødeleggende og hyppig forekommende naturfarer. Fordi flomfrekvens er koblet til stadige klimaendringer må sivilsamfunnet arbeide aktivt for å tilpasse seg i samsvar med hvordan kunnskapen om flom oppdateres. Eksempler på tilpasning kan være hvor man vil legge nye bygninger, hvordan og hvor man bygger ny infrastruktur so...
Article
Full-text available
A process-based understanding of lacustrine deposited sediments in Arctic lakes is essential to set the present warming and hydroclimatic shift into perspective. From such a perspective, we can enhance our understanding of the natural climate variability in the Arctic. Here, we present work from the northern coast of Spitsbergen in which we unravel...
Article
What are the long-term consequences of invasive species? After invasion, how long do ecosystems require to reach a new equilibrium? Answering these questions requires long-term, high-resolution data that are vanishingly rare. We combined the analysis of environmental DNA extracted from a lake sediment core, coprophilous fungi, and sedimentological...
Article
Full-text available
Assessments of present and future flood hazard are often limited by the scarcity and short time span of the instrumental time series. In pursuit of documenting the occurrence and magnitude of pre-instrumental flood events, the field of paleoflood hydrology emerged during the second half of the 20th century. Historically, this field has mainly been...
Article
Full-text available
Content and fluxes of ice-transported sand-sized and gravel-sized, lithic parti- cles in marine sediment cores are a common tool used to reconstruct glacial variability. Ice-rafted debris data sets are currently acquired in several differ- ent and often time-consuming ways, and within various grain-size fractions. This article proposes a novel work...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Here we present work in progress from Buervatnet at the Folgefonn Peninsula, located on the west coast of Norway. Earlier work from Buervatnet indicated several distinct spikes in the Silica count rates, detected by the ITRAX surface XRF-scanner. However, the process behind these distinct spikes was not understood. The arrival of high-resolution an...
Article
Glaciers show a sensitive and rapid response to climate shifts. Associated changes in ice extent drive variations in the production of rock flour, the suspended product of glacial erosion. These glacigenic sediments may accumulate in downstream lakes, continuously recording glacier history. Consequently, the lacustrine sediment records of such glac...
Article
Full-text available
River floods holds the capasity to erode and transport sediments that are deposited whenever the discharge is redused. In catchments that are subjected to repeated flooding, downstream lakes can therefore contain a record of past events across multiple timescales. High-resolution core scanning analyses such as X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning and...
Presentation
Full-text available
Recent paleo-studies revealed climatic southern high latitude climate evolution patterns that are crucial to understand the global climate evolution(1,2). Among others the strength and north-south shifts of westerlies wind appeared to be a key parameter(3). However, virtually no lands are located south of the 45th South parallel between Southern Ge...
Presentation
Full-text available
Recent paleo-studies revealed climatic southern high latitude climate evolution patterns that are crucial to understand the global climate evolution(1,2). Among others the strength and north-south shifts of westerlies wind appeared to be a key parameter(3). However, virtually no lands are located south of the 45th South parallel between Southern Ge...
Article
Full-text available
Here we present the first high-resolution late-Holocene glacier record from the Lofoten archipelago in northern Norway. The study is based on analyses of lacustrine sediments from the distal glacier-fed lake Kveitvikvatnet (30.1 m a.s.l.), as well as glacial-geomorphological mapping of the ~4.2-km2 surrounding catchment. The lake sediment cores hav...
Conference Paper
In this study, the frequency of mass-wasting events and past storminess has been reconstructed throughout the Holocene (11500 cal. yr BP to present) from lacustrine sediments in lake Trehynnvatnet (33 m a.s.l.), which is located in a glacially carved valley at Nykvåg on the outmost coast of western Langøya, Vesterålen, northern Norway. Sediment cor...
Conference Paper
Glacier Lake Outburst Floods (GLOF), or Jökulhlaup, represent a major geohazard, and especially under presently witnessed, and further predicted warming climatic conditions, the need to improve our understanding of the processes governing the catastrophic drainage of ice-dammed lakes is prominent. Moreover, the timing of discrete GLOF events can pr...
Article
Full-text available
Destructive floods impose severe consequences on societies, leaving havoc and death in their wake. Annually, an average of 9000 people are killed, and 115 million require immediate assistance or are displaced by floods worldwide. Because of population increase in flood-prone areas alone, the number of people exposed to floods in North America is ex...
Article
Studying glacial and mountain hazards is necessary as the world seems to face major climate changes, which may increase the frequency of catastrophic events, e.g., debris flows. The latter processes are well understood, but changes in their frequency and relationships to climatic variability are not. In the present study, aiming at imaging an entir...
Conference Paper
Sediment records from proglacial lake Russvatnet in eastern Jotunheimen central southern Norway comprise a complex combination of direct glacier-derived material from glaciers in the catchment as well as material from a variety of different episodic mass movement processes. To disentangle the sedimentary units we utilize a multi proxy approach anal...
Conference Paper
In an effort to improve the understanding of long-term variability in flood frequency and how they relate to climate change, we have developed a method that objectively identifies the sedimentary imprint of individual river floods in downstream lake basins. Here we have applied the method to two lake sediment records collected from two different mo...
Article
Lake sediments have previously been used to reconstruct debris flow activity back in time (e.g. Støren et al., 2008). In the present study we further develop this type of research by investigating direct linkages of lake sediments to specific slope deposits on land. To do this we use a combined approach, including sediment core analysis and geophys...
Article
Full-text available
Analysis of two continuous, high-resolution palaeo-flood records from southern Norway reveals that the frequency of extreme flood events has changed significantly during the Holocene. During the early and middle Holocene, flood frequency was low; by contrast, it was high over the last 2300 years when the mean flood frequency was about 2.5–3.0 per c...
Article
Two lacustrine sediment cores from Oldevatnet in western Norway have been studied in order to produce a record of floods, mass-wasting events and glacier fluctuations during the last 7300 years. River floods, density currents and snow-avalanches have deposited distinct ‘event layers’ at the lake floor throughout this time interval. In this study, a...
Article
Full-text available
The main aim of this study is to describe consequences of climate change in the mountain region of southern Norway with respect to recently exposed finds of archaeological remains associated with reindeer hunting and trapping at and around ice patches in central southern Norway. In the early years of the twenty-first century, warm summers caused ne...
Article
Full-text available
In an effort to improve the understanding of floods and how they relate to climate we have developed a method that objectively identifies the sedimentary imprint of individual river floods in downstream lake basins. The method is applied to a high-resolution lake sediment core retrieved from Southern Norway, resulting in a detailed record of Holoce...
Conference Paper
Valleys, lakes and fjords are spectacular features of the Norwegian landscape and their sedimentary record recall past climatic, environmental and glacio-isostatic changes since the late glacial. A high resolution multi-proxy study is being performed on three lakes in western Norway combining different geophysical methods and sediment coring with t...
Conference Paper
In semi-continental eastern and central southern Norway changes in river discharge are at present highly connected to changes in solid winter precipitation, and the subsequent spring-snowmelt season with episodically large river floods. Extreme events such as river-floods are by definition rare, and instrumental and historical records that only ext...
Article
Full-text available
The lacustrine sediments of proglacial lake Russvatnet in eastern Jotunheimen, central southern Norway, comprise a combination of glacier-derived material from the glacier Blackwellbreen and several episodic paraglacial processes in the catchment. This study focuses on the characteristics of lake sediments, and the decomposition of a 4000-yr comple...

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Volcanic ash (tephra) markers represent a powerful geochronological tool: rapid widespread deposition allows synchronization of geological records across vast areas. Such exercises offer paleoclimatologists the unique opportunity to study the behaviour of Earth`s climate system through time and across space. Analytical progress over the past decades now allow the identification of smaller ash shards ever further from their source volcanoes, expanding the potential of the method. However, labor-intensive and specialized lab procedures limit the pace of progress. In CTIENTIFIC, we explore the potential of Computed Tomography (CT) scanning to overcome this restriction by rapidly visualizing invisible ash horizons in 3D. To do so, we have created a controlled experiment - based on a set of synthetic sediment cores.
Project
This project is a joint proposal of EDYTEM (CNRS, université Savoie Mont Blanc) and the Department of Earth science, University of Bergen. The objective of this project is to perform at least Holocene-long sediment cores from Kerguelen lakes in order to do high resolution continuous reconstructing of past climate fluctuations with sedimentological and geochemical proxies. The proposal is connected to an ongoing project at University of Bergen where similar sites in Northern Hemisphere will be investigated with the same methods together with sites at South Georgia in the southern Atlantic Ocean. In this proposal focused on Kerguelen Archipelago, two complementary approaches will be applied: i) in Lake Armor, a lake with no glacier in its catchment area, erosion fluxes will be used to reconstruct past precipitation patterns (already cored in 2014, under studuy) ; ii) in lakes with a glacier in their catchment area (Lake Guynemer area and Lake Aphrodite area), erosion fluxes will be used to reconstruct past glacier fluctuations (this proposal). In a second time, this two records will be associated to reconstruct the past shift or changes in intensity of the Southern Westerly Wind. Finally, those approaches will be completed by Holocene sea-salt aerosols reconstructions from element geochemistry.