Eileen Jeffrey Gutiérrez

Eileen Jeffrey Gutiérrez
University of California, Berkeley | UCB · School of Public Health

PhD

About

17
Publications
1,816
Reads
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113
Citations
Citations since 2017
9 Research Items
97 Citations
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Introduction
I am interested in the eco-physiological drivers of variation in a mosquito population's ability to transmit disease. By understanding the links between ecology and the physiology of mosquitoes, it is possible to explore new surveillance tools and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions.
Additional affiliations
May 2018 - December 2019
Malaria Elimination Initiative, University of California San Francisco
Position
  • Entomologist, Translator
Description
  • Training vector control teams on a novel Entomological Surveillance Planning Tool (includes mosquito surveillance, control, & evaluation of effectiveness of interventions). Leading surveillance & data collection in the field.
January 2017 - July 2017
Pacific Island Health Officers Association
Position
  • Vector Control Specialist
Description
  • Worked w/ vector control (VC) teams of U.S. Pacific island territories & affiliated nations to evaluate & train on VC activities & surveillance protocols. Worked w/ teams in Guam, Chuuk and Kosrae (Micronesia), Am. Samoa & Rep. of the Marshall Islands.
June 2016 - January 2017
The University of Arizona
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Rearing (milkweed host plants and) monarch butterflies to define the eco-physiological trigger(s) for the monarch's migratory phenotype.
Education
August 2011 - December 2019
The University of Arizona
Field of study
  • Entomology and Insect Science
July 2008 - May 2011
The University of Arizona
Field of study
  • Microbiology and Chemistry

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
Dengue virus, primarily transmitted by the Aedes aegypti (L.) mosquito, has rapidly expanded in geographic extent over the past several decades. In some areas, however, dengue fever has not emerged despite established Ae. aegypti populations. The reasons for this are unclear and have sometimes been attributed to socio-economic differences. In 2013...
Article
Full-text available
Aedes aegypti, the primary vector of dengue virus, is well established throughout urban areas of the Southwestern US, including Tucson, AZ. Local transmission of the dengue virus, however, has not been reported in this area. Although many factors influence the distribution of the dengue virus, we hypothesize that one contributing factor is that the...
Article
Full-text available
Dengue is an acute febrile illness caused by any of four dengue virus types (DENV-1-4). DENVs are transmitted by mosquitos of the genus Aedes (1) and are endemic throughout the tropics (2). In 2010, an estimated 390 million DENV infections occurred worldwide (2). During 2007-2013, a total of three to 10 dengue cases were reported annually in Arizon...
Conference Paper
The aim of this research is to develop our understanding of how wing size, blood feeding success, and longevity are related in Aedes aegypti populations. Wing size is reflective of the environmental conditions during larval development and is likely to influence vectorial capacity during adulthood. Those that are involved in the surveillance and co...
Article
Full-text available
Background Although most of Panamá is free from malaria, localized foci of transmission persist, including in the Guna Yala region. Government-led entomological surveillance using an Entomological Surveillance Planning Tool (ESPT) sought to answer programmatically relevant questions on local entomological drivers of transmission and gaps in protect...
Article
Full-text available
Background The Aedes aegypti mosquito is a vector of several viruses including dengue, chikungunya, zika, and yellow fever. Vector surveillance and control are the primary methods used for the control and prevention of disease transmission; however, public health institutions largely rely on measures of population abundance as a trigger for initiat...
Preprint
Full-text available
Malaria is among the world's deadliest diseases, predominantly affecting sub-Saharan Africa, and killing over half a million people annually. Controlling the principal vector, the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, as well as other anophelines, is among the most effective methods to control disease spread. Here we develop an innovative genetic population...
Article
Full-text available
As gene drive mosquito projects advance from contained laboratory testing to semi-field testing and small-scale field trials, there is a need to assess monitoring requirements to: i) assist with the effective introduction of the gene drive system at field sites, and ii) detect unintended spread of gene drive mosquitoes beyond trial sites, or resist...
Article
Full-text available
Background Though most of Panamá is free from malaria, localized foci of transmission persist, including in the Guna Yala region. Government-led entomological surveillance using an entomological surveillance planning tool (ESPT) sought to answer programmatically-relevant questions that would enhance the understanding of both local entomological dri...
Article
Full-text available
The Aedes aegypti mosquito is the primary vector of dengue, yellow fever, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. Infection with the dengue virus alone occurs in an estimated 400 million people each year. Likelihood of infection with a virus transmitted by Ae. aegypti is most commonly attributed to abundance of the mosquito. However, the Arizona-Sonora dese...
Conference Paper
To accelerate progress towards malaria elimination, the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Technical Strategy 2016-2030 calls for maximizing the impact of vector control by strengthening entomological surveillance and capacity and managing insecticide resistance and residual transmission. In response to these efforts, we have developed an Entom...
Article
Full-text available
Aedes aegypti (L.; Diptera: Culicidae) has been established in the southwestern United States for several decades, but relationships between humans and mosquitoes in this arid region are not well-characterized. In August 2012, the outdoor premises of 355 houses within 20 neighborhoods in Tucson, Arizona were surveyed for containers that could provi...
Data
Average SCP-1 gene expression per age group. The average SCP-1 gene expression and standard error of single mosquitoes used in the aging model is presented here by age group, untransformed (n = 154). (TIF)
Data
Ae. aegypti orthologues of age associated genes. The five genes (AGAP009551, AGAP011615, AGAP002827, AGAP005501, and AGAP009790) adopted from Wang, 2010 were transformed to Ae. aegypti orthologues with the use of the NCBI Homologene database. The primer sequence and efficiency is provided. (TIF)
Data
Expression profiles of seven putative age associated genes. Three to nine replicates of pooled mosquito samples from various time points (1, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, or 35 days post emergence) were tested for expression profiles of seven previously reported age associated genes. For AGA011615 (S1D) a significant increase in transcript expression was obser...
Conference Paper
Dengue is a worldwide threat that could potentially infect millions of people annually. The primary mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, is well established throughout urban areas of the southwestern US, yet intriguingly the disease is not present. Although many factors may influence dengues distribution, we hypothesize that the lifespan of female Ae. a...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
This study’s aim was to use wing length as a proxy for body size, to characterize the temperature and resource-availability during development. Size can be a reliable proxy for nutrient- and temperature-dependent, hormonal-metabolic regulation of life-history strategies (Davidowitz, 2016). In insect-disease systems, this effectively means that surveillance including size measurements might enable predictions about a population’s response to environmental change, with regards to vectorial capacity (Araújo et al. 2012).
Project
This study’s aim was to characterize the parameters of temperature and resource-availability during larval development that result in body-size -longevity trade-offs. Size can be a reliable proxy for nutrient- and temperature-dependent, hormonal-metabolic regulation of life-history strategies (Davidowitz, 2016).