Eija Meriläinen

Eija Meriläinen
Örebro University | oru

Doctor of Science

About

26
Publications
1,621
Reads
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96
Citations
Citations since 2017
20 Research Items
96 Citations
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Introduction
I study disasters and disruptions, and their impacts on everyday lives. Among other things, I am interested in how various shocks entangle with housing situations, and how forests entangle with future risks. Contextually, I am interested in the Nordics and Latin America.

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Pääkirjoitus teemanumeroon Resurssiperiferia elää metsistään?
Article
Full-text available
Forests, and the politics around them, are posited both as a cause of and solution to the contemporary ecological crisis. This paper explores how rights to forest and rights of forest conceptualisations can re-articulate, and potentially challenge, the problematic dominance of capitalist forest politics in Northern Finland and beyond. Conceptually,...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose The neoliberal resilience discourse and its critiques both contribute to its hegemony, obscuring alternative discourses in the context of risk and uncertainties. Drawing from the “ontology of potentiality”, the authors suggest reclaiming “resilience” through situated accounts of the connected and relational every day from the global south....
Article
Full-text available
Communities are powerful and necessary agents for defining and pursuing their health, but outside organizations often adopt community health promotion approaches that are patronizing and top-down. Conversely, bottom-up approaches that build on and mobilize community health assets are often critiqued for tasking the most vulnerable and marginalized...
Article
Full-text available
The health impacts of climate change are distributed inequitably, with marginalized communities typically facing the direst consequences. However, the concerns of the marginalized remain comparatively invisible in research, policy and practice. Participatory action research (PAR) has the potential to centre these concerns, but due to unequal power...
Article
Full-text available
Disasters connected to natural hazards can at the same time be unfolding events, as well as structural phenomena with unequal disaster risk constructed over an extended timespan. Hence, in disaster studies, temporality and spatiality are central, yet often implicit, concepts employed to make sense of the disaster phenomena. In this article we expli...
Article
Full-text available
Katastrofitutkimus (disaster studies) pureutuu vaaroihin, katastrofeihin ja kriiseihin. Tutkimusalue ei ole vakiintunut yhteiskuntatieteiden osaksi Suomessa, mutta sillä on annettavaa erityisesti luonnonilmiöihin kietoutuneita katastrofeja tutkittaessa. Tämä katsausartikkeli tarkastelee, millaista suomenkielistä käsitteistöä katastrofeja tutkittaes...
Article
Full-text available
Väitöstilaisuuden Lectio Praecursoria Hanken School of Economics 8.5.2020
Article
Full-text available
The influence of private actors, such as non-profit organizations (NPOs) and firms, has been increasing in disaster gov-ernance. Previous literature has interrogated the responsibilities of states towards citizens in disasters, but the roles of private actors have been insufficiently challenged. The article politicizes the entangled relations betwe...
Article
In this essay we expose three dark sides of social innovation (SI) by mobilising the concept of resilience. We examine implications for SI from (1) resilience thinking, (2) (critical) resilience studies and (3) the exceptional contexts in which resilience is needed. The first dark side of SI is that SIs lead to disruptions likely to cause unintende...
Article
Full-text available
In contemporary neoliberal regimes, urban disaster governance typically emphasises resilience of cities and their inhabitants. Marginalised urban people, most vulnerable to disasters, are thereby expected to exhibit self-organisation. Yet cities tend to be (re)constructed for capital, prioritising exchange-value, while the use-value is comparativel...
Article
Full-text available
Resilience has become a dominant disaster governance discourse. It has been criticised for insufficiently addressing systemic vulnerabilities, while urging the vulnerable to self‐organise. The urban resilience discourse involves a particular disconnect, simultaneously evoking ‘robustness’ and unaffectedness on a city scale on the one hand, and self...
Chapter
Disasters are studied within a variety of academic research streams and with a plethora of different foci. The research presented in this book chapter is navigating the terrains between disaster resilience and humanitarian logistics and supply chain management (HLSCM) disciplines. Bridging the two domains connects the top-down managerial view of th...
Conference Paper
Focus on resilience in disaster reconstruction could at best draw the focus to the wellbeing and agency of the affected communities, rather than to instrumental solutions. Yet it may also decrease the accountability of the aiding organizations towards the communities, while leaving the systemic makings of disaster untouched. If in disaster reconstr...
Conference Paper
The coordination of actors has been a major focus for much of the research in the disaster relief humanitarian logistics discipline. Much of this literature focuses on the initial response phase, little has been written on the longer term recover phase. As the phases transition into long term recovery, the number and types of actors change from pre...

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