Efrén López-Blanco

Efrén López-Blanco
Greenland Institute of Natural Resources

PhD

About

24
Publications
7,799
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626
Citations
Introduction
My research is focused on terrestrial carbon exchange in high latitudes with a particular emphasis on the integration between field observations and numerical modelling. In a nutshell, I use process-based modelling and model-data fusion approaches together with in-situ and remote sensing data to establish robust baselines for model calibration and validation and explore prognostic scenarios applying modern ecological forecasting techniques.
Additional affiliations
October 2018 - May 2020
Aarhus University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2014 - October 2018
Aarhus University | The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • PhD

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
An improvement in our process-based understanding of carbon (C) exchange in the Arctic and its climate sensitivity is critically needed for understanding the response of tundra ecosystems to a changing climate. In this context, we analysed the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 in West Greenland tundra (64° N) across eight snow-free periods in 8 c...
Article
Full-text available
There is a significant knowledge gap in the current state of the terrestrial carbon (C) budget. Recent studies have highlighted a poor understanding particularly of C pool transit times and of whether productivity or biomass dominate these biases. The Arctic, accounting for approximately 50 % of the global soil organic C stocks, has an important ro...
Article
Full-text available
The FLUXNET2015 dataset provides ecosystem-scale data on CO2, water, and energy exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere, and other meteorological and biological measurements, from 212 sites around the globe (over 1500 site-years, up to and including year 2014). These sites, independently managed and operated, voluntarily contributed their...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic tundra is a globally important store for carbon (C). However, there is a lack of reference sites characterising C exchange dynamics across annual cycles. Based on the Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring (GEM) programme, here we present 9–11 years of flux and ecosystem data across the period 2008–2018 from two wetland sites in Greenland: Zackenber...
Article
Past efforts to synthesize and quantify the magnitude and change in carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems across the rapidly warming Arctic–boreal zone (ABZ) have provided valuable information but were limited in their geographical and temporal coverage. Furthermore, these efforts have been based on data aggregated over varying time...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic warming is affecting snow cover and soil hydrology, with consequences for carbon sequestration in tundra ecosystems. The scarcity of observations in the Arctic has limited our understanding of the impact of covarying environmental drivers on the carbon balance of tundra ecosystems. In this study, we address some of these uncertainties throug...
Article
Full-text available
Predicted intensified climate warming will likely alter the ecosystem net carbon (C) uptake of the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau (QTP). Variations in C sink–source responses to climate warming have been linked to water availability; however, the mechanisms by which net C uptake responds to soil water content in saturated swamp meadow ecosystems remain un...
Preprint
Full-text available
Arctic warming is affecting snow cover and soil hydrology, with consequences for carbon sequestration in tundra ecosystems. The scarcity of observations in the Arctic has limited our understanding of the impact of covarying environmental drivers on the carbon balance of tundra ecosystems. In this study, we address some of these uncertainties throug...
Preprint
Full-text available
Predicted intensified climate warming will likely alter the ecosystem net carbon (C) uptake of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP). Variations in C sink/source responses to climate warming have been linked to water availability; however, the mechanisms by which net C uptake responds to soil water content in water-saturated swamp meadow ecosystems remai...
Preprint
Full-text available
Past efforts to synthesize and quantify the magnitude and change in carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems across the rapidly warming Arctic-Boreal Zone (ABZ) have provided valuable information, but were limited in their geographical and temporal coverage. Furthermore, these efforts have been based on data aggregated over varying tim...
Article
The regional variability in tundra and boreal carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes can be high, complicating efforts to quantify sink‐source patterns across the entire region. Statistical models are increasingly used to predict (i.e., upscale) CO2 fluxes across large spatial domains, but the reliability of different modeling techniques, each with different...
Article
Full-text available
p>The following authors were omitted from the original version of this Data Descriptor: Markus Reichstein and Nicolas Vuichard. Both contributed to the code development and N. Vuichard contributed to the processing of the ERA-Interim data downscaling. Furthermore, the contribution of the co-author Frank Tiedemann was re-evaluated relative to the co...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic is getting warmer and wetter. Here, we document two independent examples of how associated extreme precipitation patterns have severe implications for high Arctic ecosystems. The events stand out in a 23-year record of continuous observations of a wide range of ecosystem parameters and act as an early indication of conditions projected t...
Article
Full-text available
The FLUXNET2015 dataset provides ecosystem-scale data on CO2, water, and energy exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere, and other meteorological and biological measurements, from 212 sites around the globe (over 1500 site-years, up to and including year 2014). These sites, independently managed and operated, voluntarily contributed their...
Thesis
Full-text available
The terrestrial CO2 exchange in the Arctic plays an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle. The Arctic ecosystems, containing a large amount of organic carbon (C), are experiencing ongoing warming in recent decades, which is affecting the C cycling and the feedback interactions between its different components. To improve our understanding o...
Article
Full-text available
The climate sensitivity of carbon (C) cycling in Arctic terrestrial ecosystems is a major unknown in the Earth system. There is a lack of knowledge about the mechanisms that drive the interactions between photosynthesis, respiration and changes in C stocks across full annual cycles in Arctic tundra. We use a calibrated and validated model (SPA) to...
Article
Full-text available
There is a significant knowledge gap in the current state of the terrestrial carbon (C) budget. The Arctic accounts for approximately 50 % of the global soil organic C stock, emphasizing the important role of Arctic regions in the global C cycle. Recent studies have pointed to the poor understanding of C pools turnover, although remain unclear as t...
Presentation
Full-text available
This presentation is part of the 2017 Fall Meeting B11J The Resilience and Vulnerability of Arctic and Boreal Ecosystems session. For further info about this session check: https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/meetingapp.cgi/Session/31855
Poster
Full-text available
The aim of this poster is to show how we use together field observations and model simulations together to analyze the patterns of carbon exchange and their links to biological processes in Arctic ecosystems. *Download item to get an image with higher quality *
Article
Full-text available
Methane (CH4) emissions from arctic tundra typically follow relations with soil temperature and water table depth, but these process-based descriptions can be difficult to apply to areas where no measurements exist. We formulated a description of the broader temporal flux pattern in the growing season based on two distinct CH4 source components fro...
Article
Full-text available
Insect outbreaks can have important consequences for tundra ecosystems. In this study, we synthesise available information on outbreaks of larvae of the noctuid moth Eurois occulta in Greenland. Based on an extensive dataset from a monitoring programme in Kobbefjord, West Greenland, we demonstrate effects of a larval outbreak in 2011 on vegetation...
Article
Full-text available
An improvement in our process-based understanding of carbon (C) exchange in the Arctic, and its climate sensitivity, is critically needed for understanding the response of tundra ecosystems to a changing climate. In this context, we analyzed the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 in West Greenland tundra (64° N) across eight snow-free periods in e...
Thesis
Full-text available
Disturbances such as wildfires are key players involved in the shape, structure and function of the ecosystems. Fire is rarely included in Dynamic global vegetation models due to their difficulty in implementing its processes and impacts associated. Therefore, it is essential to understand the variables and processes involved in fire, and to evalua...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring (GEM) is a long term monitoring programme operated by greenlandic and danish research institutions. GEM has over the past two decades established itself firmly as an internationally leading climate change related environmental barometer measuring climate impacts and ecosystem changes in the Arctic. A new strategy (GEM Strategy 2017-2021) aims at taking the programme a step further towards being able to assess and understand ecosystem change and function at local and greenlandic scale by implementing comprehensive monitoring programmes at three locations along the Greenlandic climate gradient and combine this with a remote sensing component and targeted gradient studies at selected locations. GEM also aims to establish strong linkages to other long term monitoring programmes and relevant research initiatives that can contribute to the overall vision of GEM: “GEM will contribute substantially to the basic scientific understanding of arctic ecosystems and their responses to climatic changes and variability as well as the potential local, regional and global implications of changes in arctic ecosystems.” The mission of GEM is threefold and embraces the following actions: 1. To contribute to a coherent and science-based description of the state of the environment, including its biodiversity, in Greenland and the Arctic in relation to climatic changes with focus on ecosystem responses and on global impacts related to feedback processes. 2. To provide science-based input on the state of the environment in Greenland and the Arctic for danish, greenlandic and international policy development, adaptation and administration. 3. To provide a platform for cutting-edge inter-disciplinary research on the structure and function of arctic ecosystems. www.g-e-m.dk