Ee Pin Chang

Ee Pin Chang
University of Western Australia | UWA · School of Indigenous Studies

PhD (Psychology)
Addressing the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the Australian justice system

About

9
Publications
19,122
Reads
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280
Citations
Citations since 2016
8 Research Items
273 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
Introduction
Addressing the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the justice system through enhancing social and emotional wellbeing
Additional affiliations
February 2019 - present
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Coordinating Tutor
Description
  • Cognitive Psychology (PSYC3315)
June 2018 - November 2018
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Suicide Prevention
February 2018 - June 2018
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Sessional Tutor
Description
  • Intermediate Quantitative Research Methods
Education
March 2014 - February 2019
University of Western Australia
Field of study
  • Psychology (Cognition and Emotion)
September 2009 - December 2013
University of Western Australia
Field of study
  • Psychology
July 1988 - June 1991
National University of Singapore
Field of study
  • Accountancy

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Full-text available
Fact‐checking has become an important feature of the modern media landscape. However, it is unclear what the most effective format of fact‐checks is. Some have argued that simple retractions that repeat a false claim and tag it as false may backfire because they boost the claim's familiarity. More detailed refutations may provide a more promising a...
Article
Full-text available
People often continue to rely on misinformation in their reasoning after they have acknowledged a retraction; this phenomenon is known as the continued-influence effect. Retractions can be particularly ineffective when the retracted misinformation is consistent with a pre-existing worldview. We investigated this effect in the context of depressive...
Preprint
Full-text available
People remember events and materials better when these are congruent with their mood at retrieval; this is known as the mood-congruent memory bias. This effect is largest when the materials are self-referential and this is known as the self-reference effect. We present two word rating studies, to create a list of self-referential valenced words tha...
Poster
Full-text available
People continue to rely on retracted misinformation in their reasoning after they have acknowledged a retraction. This phenomenon is known as the continued influence effect. There is evidence that retractions can be particularly ineffective when the retracted misinformation is consistent with a person’s pre-existing attitudes. The current study inv...
Article
Full-text available
We present evidence that dysphoric rumination involves a working memory (WM) updating deficit. Sixty-one undergraduates—pre-screened with rumination and depression scales—completed a novel task providing a specific measure of WM updating. This task involved the substitution of emotionally-valenced words, and provided an online measure of the time t...
Article
Full-text available
Information presented in news articles can be misleading without being blatantly false. Experiment 1 examined the effects of misleading headlines that emphasize secondary content rather than the article’s primary gist. We investigated how headlines affect readers’ processing of factual news articles and opinion pieces, using both direct memory meas...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am interested to know if there is any study done on differential ratings of words between depressed and controls, in terms of how self-referential the words are.

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Projects

Project (1)