Ee Lin Tek

Ee Lin Tek
University of Adelaide · School of Agriculture, Food and Wine

Doctor of Philosophy

About

5
Publications
731
Reads
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60
Citations
Citations since 2017
4 Research Items
60 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023051015
2017201820192020202120222023051015
2017201820192020202120222023051015
Additional affiliations
February 2016 - May 2016
University of Cambridge
Position
  • Visiting PhD student
March 2015 - June 2015
University of Adelaide
Position
  • Demonstrator - Microbiology for Viticulture and Oenology
February 2014 - present
University of Adelaide
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
February 2013 - December 2013
University of Adelaide
Field of study
  • Wine Science
February 2010 - December 2012
University of South Australia
Field of study
  • Nutrition and Food Science

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
In the presence of glycoproteins, bacterial and yeast biofilms are hypothesized to expand by sliding motility. This involves a sheet of cells spreading as a unit, facilitated by cell proliferation and weak adhesion to the substratum. In this paper, we derive an extensional flow model for biofilm expansion by sliding motility to test this hypothesis...
Article
Full-text available
The emergence of diffusion-limited growth (DLG) within a microbial colony on a solid substrate is studied using a combination of mathematical modelling and experiments. Using an agent-based model of the interaction between microbial cells and a diffusing nutrient, it is shown that growth directed towards a nutrient source may be used as an indicato...
Article
Previous experiments have shown that mature yeast mat biofilms develop a floral morphology, characterised by the formation of petal-like structures. In this work, we investigate the hypothesis that nutrient-limited growth is the mechanism by which these floral patterns form. To do this, we use a combination of experiments and mathematical analysis....
Article
Commercially available active dried wine yeasts are regularly used by winemakers worldwide to achieve reliable fermentations and obtain quality wine. This practice has led to increased evidence of traces of commercial wine yeast in the vineyard, winery and uninoculated musts. The mechanism(s) that enables commercial wine yeast to persist in the win...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I tried to excise the cell-containing agar and performed standard RNA extraction using TRIzol. For precipitation, i tried both isopropanol and ethanol method with salt. Quality wasn't good. Any tips to improve the quality? 

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