Edward Noon

Edward Noon
Leeds Trinity University · Department for Children, Young People and Families

Doctor of Philosophy

About

19
Publications
43,386
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112
Citations
Introduction
Edward Noon is a Senior Lecturer in Children, Young People, and Families at Leeds Trinity University. He has recently received his PhD from Sheffield Hallam University, and his research concerns the role of social network sites in adolescent identity development.
Featured research
Article
Full-text available
Whilst there is an emerging literature concerning social comparisons on social networking sites (SNSs), very little is known about the extent to which such behaviours inform adolescent identity. Drawing upon the three-factor model of identity development (Crocetti, Rubini & Meeus, 2008), this study seeks to determine the relationship between Instagram comparisons of ability and opinion and three identity processes: commitment, in-depth exploration, and reconsideration of commitment. 177 British adolescents responded to a paper survey (Mage = 15.45; Female, 54.8%) between December 2018 and February 2019. Instagram social comparisons of ability were positively associated with commitment and in-depth exploration, whilst their relationship with reconsideration of commitment was moderated by gender. In contrast, Instagram social comparisons of opinion were positively related with in-depth exploration and reconsideration of commitment. Findings suggest that although both forms of social comparison behaviour may evoke adolescents to explore their identity, Instagram social comparisons of ability may have less maladaptive identity implications for adolescent males.
Article
Full-text available
Research on the negative psycho-emotional implications of social comparisons on social network sites such as Instagram has rapidly accumulated in recent years. However, little research has considered the extent to which such comparisons can elicit positive motivational outcomes for adolescent users, specifically inspiration. Furthermore, little is known about whether it matters whom young people compare themselves to on Instagram (i.e., network composition) and how this may modulate the emotional outcomes of Instagram social comparisons. The present study thus sought to determine how adolescents' Instagram comparisons of ability associate with inspiration through the mechanism of benign and malicious envy. We further examined whether two key aspects of network composition-perceived similarity and the amount of strangers followed-moderated these relationships. Results from a paper survey among n = 266 British adolescents confirm the hypothesis that those adolescents who compare more strongly on Instagram also report more inspiration from Instagram use. While benign envy positively mediated this relationship, malicious envy worked in the opposite direction, indicating the need to distinguish these two types of envy in future research. In addition, while the amount of strangers followed did not significantly affect the relationships between social comparison, envy, and inspiration, higher perceived network homophily positively moderated the relationship between social comparison and inspiration by eliciting more benign and less malicious envy. Results overall suggest that social comparisons on Instagram may be more inspiring when adolescents compare themselves to similar others and avoid unachievable false role models in their online networks.
Article
Full-text available
Interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) is a contemporary qualitative methodology, first developed by psychologist Jonathan Smith (1996). Whilst its roots are in psychology, it is increasingly being drawn upon by scholars in the human, social and health sciences (Charlick, Pincombe, McKellar, & Fielder, 2016). Despite this, IPA has received limited attention across educationalist literature. Drawing upon my experiences of using IPA to explore the barriers to the use of humour in the teaching of Childhood Studies (Noon, 2017), this paper will discuss its theoretical orientation, sampling and methods of data collection and analysis, before examining the strengths and weaknesses to IPA's employment in educational research.
Article
This study tested whether age moderates the longitudinal relationships between upward and downward comparisons on Instagram and three identity processes (i.e., commitment, in-depth exploration, and reconsideration of commitment). Two hundred and eleven British emerging adults completed two self-report surveys, two months apart, in early 2020. A cross-lagged panel model with interaction terms found that age moderated the relationships between both upward and downward comparisons on Instagram and commitment. Contingent moderations were found: the relationship between upward comparisons and commitment was negative for older participants, whilst the relationship between downward comparisons and commitment was negative for younger participants. Significant age differences were not found in the paths between the comparison behaviours and the two exploratory processes. Findings therefore provide evidence to suggest that developmental factors may inform the identity implications of social comparisons on Instagram during emerging adulthood, and thus, developmental sensitivity is required when supporting emerging adults to navigate the platform.
Article
Introduction Social networking sites such as Instagram have provided young people with unprecedented opportunities for social comparison, and such behaviour can have implications for identity development. Although initial evidence suggests that there may be developmental differences in terms of how such behaviour informs identity development during adolescence and emerging adulthood, all previous research has been conducted in highly individualistic cultural contexts (i.e., the UK and the US). Method To shed further light on these possible developmental differences and to determine whether results replicate amongst young people from more collectivist cultural contexts, cross-sectional survey data were collected from 1,085 (M age = 18.87, SD = 2.57; Female = 77.8%) adolescents and emerging adults in Romania and Serbia between December 2019 and March 2020. The relationships between social comparisons of ability and opinion on Instagram and three key identity processes (i.e., commitment, in-depth exploration, and reconsideration of commitment) were then examined. Result Hierarchical multiple regression analyses identified significant age differences in terms of how social comparisons of ability and opinion on Instagram associated with identity commitment and in-depth exploration. Furthermore, possible cultural differences were identified in terms of how social comparisons of opinion on Instagram associated with the identity processes. Conclusion Overall, results suggest that whilst social comparisons on Instagram can elicit self-focus and prompt further exploration, developmental and cultural factors may influence how such behaviour informs identity development during adolescence and emerging adulthood.
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - January 2017
Sheffield Hallam University
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) is a contemporary qualitative methodology, first developed by psychologist Jonathan Smith (1996). Whilst its roots are in psychology, it is increasingly being drawn upon by scholars in the human, social and health sciences (Charlick, Pincombe, McKellar, & Fielder, 2016). Despite this, IPA has received li...
Article
Full-text available
Research on the negative psycho-emotional implications of social comparisons on social network sites such as Instagram has rapidly accumulated in recent years. However, little research has considered the extent to which such comparisons can elicit positive motivational outcomes for adolescent users, specifically inspiration. Furthermore, little is...
Article
Full-text available
Whilst there is an emerging literature concerning social comparisons on social networking sites (SNSs), very little is known about the extent to which such behaviours inform adolescent identity. Drawing upon the three-factor model of identity development (Crocetti, Rubini & Meeus, 2008), this study seeks to determine the relationship between Instag...
Article
Introduction Social networking sites such as Instagram have provided young people with unprecedented opportunities for social comparison, and such behaviour can have implications for identity development. Although initial evidence suggests that there may be developmental differences in terms of how such behaviour informs identity development during...
Article
This study tested whether age moderates the longitudinal relationships between upward and downward comparisons on Instagram and three identity processes (i.e., commitment, in-depth exploration, and reconsideration of commitment). Two hundred and eleven British emerging adults completed two self-report surveys, two months apart, in early 2020. A cro...
Article
Full-text available
This is the author accepted version of the following article: Noon, E. J. & Turner, R. (2022). The European Federation of Psychology Students’ Associations Junior Researcher Programme: A Reflection from Two Research Project Supervisors. PsyPAG Quarterly, 122, 44-47. https://shop.bps.org.uk/psypag-quarterly-issue-122-june-2022
Method
Full-text available
This document contains translations of the purpose made ‘anti-mask’ scale based on the work of Taylor & Asmundson (2021) to German, Spanish, Polish and Czech, as used first in Binter et al. (2022). The original article used a 7- point Likert-type scale (1=strongly disagree, 7=strongly agree). We instead chose to employ a 5-point Likert-type scale (...
Method
Full-text available
This document contains English, Czech, German, Polish & Spanish versions of our purpose made ‘Belief in COVID-19 related Fake News’ scale. The scale was created to measure belief in COVID-19 related fake news for the cross-national study conducted by Binter et al. (2022) in April 2021. The same study shows that higher belief in COVID-19 related fak...
Method
Full-text available
This document contains translations of a short empathy scale tailored to the COVID-19 pandemic based on the work of Pfattheicher et al. (2021) to German, Spanish, Polish and Czech, as used first in Binter et al. (2022). Binter et al. show that empathy for those most vulnerable to the COVID-19 pandemic as measured by this scale in five languages and...
Preprint
Full-text available
Containing a pandemic requires that individuals adhere to measures such as wearing face-masks and get vaccinated. Therefore, identifying predictors and motives for both behaviors is of importance. Here, we study the decisions made by a cross-national sample in randomized hypothetical scenarios during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our results show that mas...
Preprint
Containing a pandemic requires that individuals adhere to measures such as wearing face-masks and get vaccinated. Therefore, identifying predictors and motives for both behaviors is of importance. Here, we study the decisions made by a cross-national sample in randomized hypothetical scenarios during the COVID-19 pandemic.Our results show that mask...
Article
Whilst there is an emerging literature concerning social comparisons on social networking sites (SNSs), very little is known about the extent to which such behaviours inform adolescent identity. Drawing upon the three-factor model of identity development (Crocetti, Rubini & Meeus, 2008), this study seeks to determine the relationship between Instag...
Article
Full-text available
Reference: Noon, E. J. (2019). ‘He must have been bad because no one I saw supported him’: Social networking site social comparisons of opinion and adolescent identity development. PsyPAG Quarterly, 112, 25-29. There is emerging evidence which suggests that when young people use social networking sites, they make social comparisons of opinion to s...
Article
Full-text available
Reference: Noon, E. J. (2018). Social network sites, social comparison, and adolescent identity development: A small-scale quantitative study. PsyPAG Quarterly, 109, 21-25. Whilst social network sites provide users with unprecedented opportunities for social comparison, we know very little about the extent to which social network site social compa...
Article
Whilst pedagogical humour is a common teaching strategy employed by educators across compulsory education systems, a review of the extant literature expounds that it is a tool largely neglected by instructors throughout higher education. As such, this study sought to discern the perspectives of educators concerning the barriers to the use of humour...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster presents a brief overview of the quantitative pilot study from my PhD research concerning social network sites, social comparison, and adolescent identity development. The findings will inform both the qualitative pilot study, and the quantitative parent study. For this study, I employed adapted versions of the Homophily Scale and the...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster presents a brief review of the extant literature concerning social network sites and adolescent identity development. The themes extracted from this review aided question design for this study
Article
Full-text available
Whilst pedagogical humour is a common teaching strategy employed by educators across compulsory education systems, a review of the extant literature expounds that it is a tool largely neglected by instructors throughout higher education. As such, this study sought to discern the perspectives of educators concerning the barriers to the use of humour...

Questions

Questions (6)
Question
Hi,
I have analysed my data using multivariate multiple regression (8 IVs, 3 DVs), and significant composite results have been found.
Before reporting my findings, I want to discuss in my results chapter (briefly) how the composite variable is created.
I have done some reading, and in the sources I have found, authors simply state that a 'weighted linear composite' or a 'linear combination of DVs' is created by SPSS (the software I am using).
They do not explain how they are weighted, and as someone relatively new to multivariate statistics, I am still unclear.
Are the composite DVs simply a mean score of the three DVs I am using, or is a more sophisticated method used on SPSS?
If the latter is true, could anyone either a) explain what this method is, or b) signpost some useful (and accessible) readings which explain the method of creating composite variables?
Many thanks,
Edward Noon
Question
Hi,
I need to run an analysis on SPSS where I have three scale variables (two IVs and their interaction term) predicting one categorical variable.
What is the correct analysis to run?
Many thanks
Question
Hi there,
I have recently conducted a moderation analysis using the PROCESS Macro plug-in for SPSS. I have tested the moderation effect of W (categorical using dummy variables) on the relationship between X (scale) and Y (scale).
I am trying to interpret the results, and I am looking for clarification (I have pasted the results at the bottom of this post).
For this model, the R-square change of the interaction is not significant - p = .055. However, for W categories 3 and 4, the p value of the conditional effects is significant, at .0002 and .0009 respectively.
I have interpreted this as the interaction between W and X only being significant in predicting Y for those in categories 3 and 4.
Is this correct, or have I interpreted this incorrectly?
Many help in advance
Test(s) of highest order unconditional interaction(s):
R2-chng F df1 df2 p
X*W .0446 2.3599 4.0000 163.0000 .0556
Focal predict: X
Mod var: W
Conditional effects of the focal predictor at values of the moderator(s):
W Effect se t p LLCI ULCI
1.0000 .0865 .1300 .6656 .5066 -.1701 .3432
2.0000 .0807 .1319 .6119 .5415 -.1798 .3412
3.0000 .4775 .1303 3.6638 .0003 .2201 .7348
4.0000 .5028 .1484 3.3879 .0009 .2098 .7959
5.0000 . 2005 .1165 1.7206 .0872 -.0296 .4306
Question
Hi,
I am looking to test the the extent to which variable M (scale) moderates the relationships between X (categorical) and y1 (scale) and y2 (scale).
I was hoping to use PROCESS, but it only has one box to drag DVs into. I was wondering if it is possible to somehow test this model using PROCESS?
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Many thanks
Question
Hi,
As part of my doctoral research, I would like to conduct a moderation analyses wherein I wish to test the moderating effect four variables (a, b, c, d) has upon the relationship between three independent variables and two dependent variables.
However, variables a, b, and c are all significantly correlated with one another.
I guess my first question is: is this an issue?
If it is, is there an agreed upon rule as to which of the three correlated moderators I should remove from the model? ie. Should I remove the two variables which moderate the least when I do them individually? Should I remove those that are, perhaps, theoretically less likely to moderate?
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Question
I am putting together a survey using four established measures: two are 5-point, one is 6-point, and one is 7-point.
Is it acceptable to use different point questions, or should I aim for consistency and make them all the same?
If so, what is the best/advised way of doing so?
Many thanks

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
This project contains the published work from my doctoral research concerning the extent to which social network site social comparisons are associated with adolescent identity development