Edward Herrmann

Edward Herrmann
Indiana University Bloomington | IUB · Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

PhD

About

22
Publications
3,133
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84
Citations
Introduction
Edward Herrmann is a faculty member in the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department. Ed is a geoarchaeologist who uses methods and theories developed in the geosciences to study archaeological questions. His training and research is multidisciplinary in nature and straddles the fields of anthropology, archaeology, history, geology, and earth science.
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - present
Indiana University Bloomington
Position
  • Managing Director
October 2018 - September 2019
Indiana University Bloomington
Position
  • Managing Director
April 2018 - present
Indiana University Bloomington
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
August 2010 - May 2013
Indiana University Bloomington
Field of study
  • Anthropology (Archaeology)
August 2008 - April 2010
Indiana University Bloomington
Field of study
  • Anthropology (Archaeology)
August 2005 - June 2006
University of Cologne
Field of study
  • Institut für Ur- und Frühgeschichte, Guest Student. Studied for two semesters, with a full course load concentrating on the peopling of Europe and the Upper Paleolithic Era.

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Previously, Olduvai Bed I excavations revealed Oldowan assemblages <1.85 Ma, mainly in the eastern gorge. New western gorge excavations locate a much older ~2.0 Ma assemblage between the Coarse Feldspar Crystal Tuff (~2.015 Ma) and Tuff IA (~1.98 Ma) of Lower Bed I, predating the oldest eastern gorge DK assemblage below Tuff IB by ~150 kyr. We char...
Article
The Olduvai Gorge deposits contain a rich archaeological record documenting the evolution of hominin behavior over the last 2 million years. While archaeological assemblages in the lower sedimentary layers (Beds I-II) are well preserved in relatively secure chronostratigraphic contexts, the age of overlying beds is poorly constrained due to discont...
Article
Mississippian mounds in the south‐eastern and mid‐continental United States often contain multiple construction stages and a diverse array of features. Investigating mound construction with excavation is expensive, logistically challenging, and sometimes politically impossible. Three mounds at the Angel site (12VG1), a Mississippian village (ca ad...
Article
Full-text available
Geophysical survey and excavations from 2010–2016 at Lawrenz Gun Club (11CS4), a late pre-Columbian village located in the central Illinois River valley in Illinois, identified 10 mounds, a central plaza, and dozens of structures enclosed within a stout 10 hectare bastioned palisade. Nineteen radiocarbon ( ¹⁴ C) measurements were taken from single...
Article
Radiocarbon dates from the base of Serpent Mound in Ohio demonstrate that it was built 2,100–2,300 years ago during the Adena period but was subsequently rebuilt or repaired about 900 years ago during the Fort Ancient period. We describe the basis for supporting the chronology of this building sequence, why it is the best and most complete explanat...
Article
Full-text available
The long-term variation in archaeological site distribution in alluvial settings results from how changing environmental conditions and drainage basin evolution interplay with cultural needs and choices to configure site distribution. These relationships are often believed synchronous with large-scale climate and environmental changes. Research res...
Article
In this article we address comments made by Bradley Lepper concerning our previously published article, “Radiocarbon Dates Reveal Serpent Mound is More than Two Thousand Years Old” (Romain, Herrmann, Monaghan, and Burks 2017). Further we offer commentary on the new radiocarbon dates provided by Lepper (this volume).
Article
Recent radiocarbon dating (Herrmann et al. 2014) found that Serpent Mound was likely built during the Early Woodland period—around 320 BC. Herrmann et al. (2014) also suggested that the effigy was repaired or restored during Fort Ancient times, thereby accounting for the late prehistoric radiocarbon-dated samples recovered by Fletcher et al. (1996)...
Article
Full-text available
Bacheeishdíio (“Place Where Men Pack Meat”), now called Grapevine Creek in English, is the subject of Crow oral traditions that document the cultural significance of the landscape and celebrate centuries of bison hunting in the drainage. We report an ongoing, community-based project that integrates archaeological field training and research goals i...
Article
Although Paleoindian sites in Indiana, USA, are commonly located on late Wisconsin (Last Glacial Maximum) outwash terraces, drainage basin development since deglaciation often obscures the visibility of such sites on flood plains by either burying them under alluvium or destroying them through erosion. Significant clusters of Paleoindian and Early...
Article
Full-text available
Effigy mounds occur across the midcontinent of North America but their cultural purposes and construction chronologies are rarely known and often controversial. Determining the age and construction history of monuments is important to relate religious symbolism, scientific knowledge, and cultural continuity to groups within a region. Based mainly o...
Article
Full-text available
The majority of projectile points found at Angel Mounds are triangular points typical of the Mississippian period. However, Paleoindian and Early Archaic projectile points predate the terrace on which the site is situated. Contemporary geoarchaeological practices were employed to date the landform and confirm that later groups must have brought the...
Conference Paper
Angel Mounds, a prehistoric town occupied AD 1050-1450, occurs along the Ohio River near Evansville, Indiana and includes eleven earthen mounds. Two of the largest mounds (A, F) were studied in detail and, based on 14C ages, were constructed in 2-3 stages between AD 1050-1400. Mound F, excavated in 1939-42 and 1964-65, had two buried platforms. The...
Conference Paper
Angel Mounds (AD 1050-1450) is a late prehistoric town on the Ohio River near Evansville, Indiana, and includes eleven earthen mounds. Chronologies for the largest mounds (A, F) show that they were constructed in stages between AD 1050-1400. A recent NSF-sponsored study at the site provides more details related to mound construction chronologies an...
Conference Paper
The Midwest Lithic Raw Material Repository at the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology has been developed over the past 40 years to facilitate a better understanding of prehistoric acquisition and utilization of lithic resources in the midcontinent. This repository curates over 500 samples with 110 lithic types from across North America, but it...
Conference Paper
The Midwest Lithic Raw Material Repository at the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology has been developed over the past 40 years to facilitate a better understanding of prehistoric acquisition and utilization of lithic resources in the midcontinent. This repository curates over 500 samples with 110 lithic types from across North America, but it...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Co-investigator, Summers 2017-Present Led field investigations, documentation, and Geographic Information Systems for excavations at the UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Project
Llong-term project focused on deciphering the post-glacial geomorphology of Indiana’s White River Valley in order to understand how terrace and floodplain evolution has affected the visibility of late Pleistocene and early Holocene archaeological sites. The goal is to incorporate this knowledge into models that can predict where these archaeological sites might be found in buried and therefore preserved fluvial contexts.
Project
Mound construction and/or site chronologies at sites such as the Great Serpent Mound in Ohio, the Lawrenz Gun Club site in Illinois and Angel Mounds in Indiana