Edward C. Butler

Edward C. Butler
South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute | SAERI

PhD

About

13
Publications
3,052
Reads
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75
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
74 Citations
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Introduction
Edward Butler currently works at the Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science at Rhodes University. Edward's areas of research are centered in fish physiology, reproductive histology and ecology with a focus on recreational fisheries. He is currently working on a project entitled 'Understanding a West African recreational fishery as a complex socio-ecological system – a case study of the fishery for giant African threadfin, Polydactylus quadrifilis (Cuvier, 1829), in the Kwanza River, Angola.'
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - November 2019
Rhodes University
Position
  • Honours student supervisor
Education
January 2016 - December 2019
Rhodes University
Field of study
  • Recreational fisheries science
January 2015 - November 2015
Rhodes University
Field of study
  • Honours degree in Ichthyology
January 2012 - November 2014
Rhodes University
Field of study
  • Majoring in Ichthyology and Entomology

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Argyrosomus japonicus is arguably South Africa’s most important estuarine recreational and small-scale fishery species. Although juvenile A. japonicus predominate in estuarine environments, where catch-and-release angling is common, limited C&R studies have taken place. The aim of this study was to use angler-behaviour to robustly examine the physi...
Article
Fishing guides are held in high esteem by recreational fishing clients whom they likely influence (for better or worse) through role-modelling. This, coupled with consensus that angler behaviour is a key determinant of ecological outcomes in the catch-and-release (C&R) process suggests exploring the state of fishing guide knowledge, attitudes and b...
Article
Knowledge of the location and timing of spawning events is critical for fisheries management. As is the case for many southern African fishes, the spotted grunter Pomadasys commersonnii was historically thought to reproduce in the coastal waters off KwaZulu-Natal Province (KZN), South Africa, with subsequent egg and larval dispersal towards the Eas...
Article
Online evidence suggests that there has been an increase in interest of using unmanned aerial vehicles or drones during land-based marine recreational fishing. In the absence of reliable monitoring programs, this study used unconventional publicly available online monitoring methodologies to estimate the growing interest, global extent, catch compo...
Article
Sagittal otolith pairs were extracted from two-hundred-and-twenty-six giant African threadfin Polydactylus quadrifilis collected from the Kwanza Estuary in Angola between 2016 and 2018 ranging in size from 160 to 1360 mm fork-length (FL) and from one to 23 years of age (26 juvenile, 170 male, nine intersex and 27 female). An additional 85 otolith p...
Article
Best-practice guidelines to improve recreational fishers’ handling during catch-and-release (C&R) events are critical to improve the conservation and management of fish stocks worldwide. While best-practice research is growing, there are knowledge gaps, with the effects of sand exposure on fish mucous membranes understudied. This study aimed to det...
Article
Full-text available
Foreign fishing tourism (FFT) is becoming increasingly popular in the developing world, where it often coexists alongside other important sectors involving domestic recreational anglers and dependant artisanal and subsistence fishing communities. Therefore, it is important that FFT operations use effective catch‐and‐release (C&R) angling to minimis...
Article
Catch-and-release (C&R) angling has increased in popularity through its mandatory and voluntary use in fisheries conservation and management. However, research has shown that fish can experience considerable stress during a C&R event. The physiological response of fishes is typically assessed by measuring the concentrations of blood-plasma cortisol...
Article
Full-text available
It has been suggested that tourism fisheries can raise the value of landed catch, provide alternative livelihoods for local artisanal fishers and, because recreationally caught fishes are often released, simultaneously conserve stocks. However, for fishing tourism to meet ecotourism standards, sustainable, local economic benefit is imperative. This...
Article
Fisheries managers are increasingly promoting catch-and-release (C&R) to manage recreationally angled fish stocks. Despite this, there is a scarcity of information on the effects of C&R on estuarine-dependent species. Cape stumpnose Rhabdosargus holubi dominates the recreational fisheries catch and provides an important source of food for subsisten...
Article
Full-text available
Catch-and-release (C&R) is increasingly popular in recreational fisheries as it is thought to protect target species while still allowing anglers to continue recreational fishing activities. Several studies have highlighted high rates of mortality and many sub-lethal effects which ultimately have a negative impact on fish population viability. With...
Article
Full-text available
A total of 141 Polydactylus quadrifilis were sampled from the Kwanza Estuary in Angola ranging in size from 436 to 1360 mm fork-length (FL). Of these, 124 were male, six intersex and 11 female. Female fish were significantly longer (mm, FL) and heavier (kg) than males and had significantly higher gonadosomatic indices (GSI’s) than those of males an...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
- Identify important biological traits of the species. - Evaluate the recreational fishery from an economic, social and ecological viewpoint. - Apply modern socio-ecological systems science in an attempt to develop a framework for the future management of African recreational fisheries