Edward B. Barbier

Edward B. Barbier
Colorado State University | CSU · Department of Economics

Doctor of Philosophy Economics

About

518
Publications
299,308
Reads
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37,241
Citations
Introduction
Edward B. Barbier currently works at the Department of Economics, Colorado State University. He does research in Resource Economics and Development Economics.
Additional affiliations
August 2017 - present
Colorado State University
Position
  • Professor
August 2000 - August 2017
University of Wyoming
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (518)
Article
Full-text available
Rural transformation is a process of comprehensive societal change whereby countries diversify their economies and reduce their reliance on agriculture and other primary product industries. “Greening” rural transformation implies making this process of structural change and economic diversification less environmentally damaging, including reducing...
Article
Full-text available
The “Dasgupta Review” of the economics of biodiversity (Dasgupta 2021) identifies many factors that threaten the ecological sustainability of our economies. This article examines how two policy failures - the underpricing and underfunding of nature – influence global land use change and terrestrial biodiversity loss. If natural areas are priced too...
Article
We use childhood exposures to disasters as natural experiments inducing variations in adulthood outcomes. Following the fetal origin hypothesis, we hypothesize that children from households with greater exposure will have poorer health, schooling, and consumption outcomes. Employing a unique dataset from Bangladesh, we test this hypothesis for the...
Chapter
This chapter explores further the policy implications of our analyses conducted in previous chapters. The discussion highlights the areas of progress needed to achieve the SDGs and also points to key policies and investments needed to attain the overall objective of sustainable development. The need for such policies is especially critical in a pos...
Chapter
This chapter explores how we can enhance and better employ our welfare analysis of the 17 SDGs to account for any environmental impacts, institutional effectiveness, and inclusivity of progress towards sustainability. We apply this analysis to the world, low-income countries, and our nine representative countries. Our results suggest that progress...
Chapter
The aim of the SDGs is to provide guidance to countries in attaining key economic, environmental, and social benchmarks that are considered essential to sustainable development. In this chapter, we address an important question: is progress towards the SDGs sufficient to ensure sustainability? Addressing the continuing environmental costs of global...
Chapter
This chapter discusses our selection of key indicators for assessing progress towards each SDG and its associated target. We begin by discussing the relationship between SDGs, targets, and indicators. We then explain the criteria for choosing our representative indicators for assessing progress towards each SDG, and our representative selection of...
Chapter
Using a representative indicator for each goal, this chapter conducts a quantitative assessment of current progress over 2000 to 2018 for each of the 17 SDGs. This assessment is applied to all countries of the world, to low-income countries, and our nine selected countries. Based on our measure of quantitative change, we then assess whether the rep...
Chapter
This chapter explains our economic method for assessing whether or not success towards implementing all 17 SDGs is being achieved. We show that it is possible to measure the welfare effects of an increase in one SDG that takes into account any interactions with any other SDG. The welfare analysis that we develop in this chapter can then be applied...
Chapter
This chapter applies our theoretical framework to assess progress in attaining the 17 SDGs since 2000, using a representative indicator for each goal. We use No Poverty (SDG 1) as our benchmark indicator, and we estimate the per capita welfare change of reductions since 2000 in poverty rates net of any gains or losses in attaining each of the remai...
Chapter
This concluding chapter summarizes the key themes of the book, and discusses key areas of future research in assessing progress towards the SDGs. In a post-pandemic world, we will need policies that accelerate attainment of the 17 SDGs as well as the rising threats of global environmental risks and the growing wealth gap between rich and poor.
Article
Full-text available
Evidence suggests that mangroves protect economic activity in coastal areas. We estimate this protection from mangroves and coastal elevation globally, examining both “direct” and “indirect” exposure events (< 100 km vs. ≥ 100 km distance from a cyclone’s “eye”, respectively). We find that higher elevation (≥ 50 m) or wide mangroves (≥ 10 m seaward...
Chapter
This introductory chapter describes briefly the UN 2030 Agenda and 17 Sustainable Development Goals and provides an overview of the book. The chapter also elaborates on the novel and unique contribution of the book to the sustainability literature, and explains how an economic approach to “putting the sustainable development goals into practice” is...
Chapter
This chapter relates the current SDGs to their forerunner, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the systems approach to sustainability. We illustrate how each of the 17 SDGs can be characterized as a goal primarily attributed to the environmental, economic, or social system, as suggested by the basic principles of sustainability science. The...
Article
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In outlining how “valuing the environment as input” could be applied to a number of contexts in low and middle-income countries, Karl-Göran Mäler laid the foundation for many additional applications of the production function approach as reported (Mäler in Valuing environmental benefits in developing countries. Special Report 29, Michigan State Uni...
Article
Full-text available
A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03271-2.
Article
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We examine the effectiveness of sub-national actions to control a novel disease, such as COVID-19, in the absence of national policy. Evidence shows that countries where sub-national governments have undertaken unilateral social distancing measures to combat the pandemic with little or no coordination have performed less well in controlling the spr...
Article
Evidence suggests that emerging infectious diseases, such as COVID-19, originate from wildlife species, and that land-use change is an important pathway for pathogen transmission to humans. We first focus on zoonotic disease spillover and the rate at which primary human cases appear, demonstrating that a potential outbreak is directly related to th...
Article
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The COVID-19 pandemic is having a major impact on conservation policies and practice at multiple scales, including protected and conserved areas (PCAs). There is a need to understand the implications for PCAs of recent actions, enacted or promoted in the wake of COVID-19. To fill this knowledge gap, we reviewed economic stimulus packages and other...
Preprint
Full-text available
Evidence suggests that climate change will increase the frequency of intense storms. Mangroves may protect economic activity in coastal areas. We develop a model that illustrates protections from mangroves and coastal elevation and estimate the impacts of cyclones on coastal economic activity. We find that higher elevation or expansive mangroves al...
Article
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Many of the environment and natural resources that constitute key “safe operating spaces”, as designated by planetary boundaries, are being exploited by a handful of large firms with considerable market share. In this paper, we discuss how the environment and natural resources that occur within a safe operating space can be treated as an exploitabl...
Article
This is the first book that employs economics to develop and apply an analytical framework for assessing progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The authors explore the historical context for the underlying sustainability concept, develop an economics-based analytical framework for assessing progress towards the SDGs, and discuss...
Article
Over past decades, low and middle‐income countries have experienced considerable expansion of agricultural land, yet this effect on growth has not been examined The following paper shows that the Solow‐Swan growth model can be extended to the case whereby arable land is expanding, as originally suggested by Solow (1956). This extension indicates th...
Article
Full-text available
The rapid loss of estuarine and coastal ecosystems (ECEs) in recent years has raised concerns over their role in protecting coastal communities from storms that damage property, cause deaths, and inflict injuries. This paper reviews valuation studies of the protective service of ECEs in terms of reducing flood damages. Although the number of studie...
Poster
Full-text available
The poster demonstrates how to combine Bow-Ties and BBN methodology to inform environmental decision-making in coastal areas. The poster is part of the the international research project Land2Sea, where the focus is how to do integrated modelling of the consequences of terrestrial activities and climate change for aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem...
Article
Earth’s ecosystems, upon which all life depends, are in a severe state of degradation. The upcoming UN Decade of Ecosystem Restoration aims to “prevent, halt and reverse the degradation of ecosystems on every continent and in every ocean.” These Voices articulate why and what action is urgently needed.
Article
Full-text available
For centuries, mangrove forests and adjacent ecosystems have been cast in a negative light due to their (often perceived) ecosystem disservices. We give contemporary examples of how such viewpoints about mangroves continue to be communicated today, with potentially adverse consequences for mangrove conservation and public support. Since public perc...
Article
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Rebuilding G20 economies after the COVID-19 pandemic requires rethinking what type of economy we need and want in the future. Simply reviving the existing ‘brown’ economy will exacerbate irreversible climate change and other environmental risks. For G20 economies, investing in a workable and affordable green transition is essential. A good place to...
Article
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Although national commitments to the Paris Climate Accord have waned, carbon mitigation by sub-national entities is on the rise globally. We examine the effectiveness of sub-national jurisdictions (e.g., states, provinces, cities) in collectively enacting greenhouse gas abatement strategies. We develop a simple model to explore the conditions under...
Article
Green transformation offers the promise of attaining increased productivity, higher incomes and wealth creation through structural change while simultaneously reducing overexploitation of natural resources and environmental degradation. This promise, however, does not materialize automatically. The key question addressed by this article is how a gr...
Article
Developing countries are highly vulnerable to the COVID-19 pandemic, in part due to the lack of international support for ensuring progress towards the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Yet the mounting financial burden faced by all countries means that additional support is unlikely to be forthcoming in the near future. It is critical that...
Article
Sustainable Development Goal 14 of the United Nations aims to “conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development”. Achieving this goal will require rebuilding the marine life-support systems that deliver the many benefits that society receives from a healthy ocean. Here we document the recovery of marine...
Article
Agricultural land expansion is a prominent feature in today’s developing countries. It is associated with a structural pattern of land use in many remote land-abundant regions where large-scale commercial primary product activities coexist with increased concentration of smallholders in more marginal areas. The result may be boom-bust cycles of dev...
Article
Full-text available
A levy on fossil fuels can support and restore ecosystems that help to stem climate change. A levy on fossil fuels can support and restore ecosystems that help to stem climate change. A man rides a horse through rainforest in the Bribri indigenous territory in the Talamanca mountains, Costa Rica
Article
Full-text available
Scientists suggest placing planetary boundaries on human-induced threats to key Earth system sinks and resources. Such boundaries define a “safe operating space” on depletion and pollution. Treating any remaining “space” as a depletable economic asset allows derivation of optimal and actual rules for depletion. We apply this analysis to natural for...
Article
Full-text available
Remote less-favored agricultural lands (LFAL) are regions in developing countries that face severe biophysical constraints on production and are in geographical locations that have limited market access. We estimate that, across developing countries, 130 million people with high infant mortality live in such areas, and the incidence is 40%. In low-...
Article
Assessment of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has largely focused on formulating appropriate targets and indicators for each goal. Much less attention has been devoted to estimating possible tradeoffs and complementarities in attaining the various SDGs. Yet such tradeoffs and complementarities clearly exist. We develop an analytical mod...
Book
Cambridge Core - Natural Resource and Environmental Economics - Natural Resources and Economic Development - by Edward B. Barbier
Article
Mangroves shelter coastlines during hazardous storm events with coastal communities experiencing mangrove deforestation are increasingly vulnerable to economic damages resulting from cyclones. To date, the benefits of mangroves in terms of protecting coastal areas have been estimated only through individual case studies of specific regions or count...
Article
We welcome the opportunity to further discuss our analysis and conclusions [1] that Larkin et al.'s [2] (hereafter LEA) comment provides. In this response, we first discuss mischaracterizations and criticisms of our analyses, then highlight how the main conclusions from both LEA's and our analyses are similar, and end with further discussion of wha...
Article
The world economy faces two major threats: increasing environmental degradation and a growing gap between rich and poor. The root cause is that natural resources—or natural capital—is underpriced, and hence overly exploited, whereas human capital—the skills embodied in the workforce—is insufficient to meet demand. This outcome has three important c...
Article
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Current mangrove planting schemes aimed at reversing global losses are prioritising short-term increases in area over long-term establishment. Without sound, evidence-based restoration policies, this approach could accelerate the demise of mangrove forests and the ecosystem services they provide.
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores how regulation of an open access fishery influences the value of a coastal habitat that serves as breeding and nursery grounds. A model of the fishery supported by a coastal wetland is developed, which includes a quota rule that restricts harvest to a fixed proportion of the current stock. The model is applied to mangrove-depend...
Article
The forest transition describes a reversal or turnaround in long-run land-use trends for a country or region from a period of net forest area loss to net gain. Following North, this paper constructs a model to show that effective institutions may impose additional costs on a representative economic agent converting forests to agriculture in a tropi...
Chapter
This chapter examines how humankind's complex relationship with water evolved historically to create today's water paradox. There is a significant difference between how water is managed and used for economic development today compared to past eras. Starting with the Agricultural Transition around 10,000 years ago, economic development was spurred...
Chapter
This chapter addresses the challenge of the chronic underpricing of water resources. In a world of rising water scarcity, the underpricing of water is anathema to good water management. There is growing recognition that this needs to change. Nearly all countries are embarking on pricing reforms and encouraging water markets to emerge. However, most...
Chapter
This chapter looks at the use of water in the modern economy, focusing on the period from the 1900s to the present day. Throughout human history, economic progress has been linked with increased water appropriation, control, and use. The global spread of industrialization from the 1900s onward further cemented this association. As a consequence, in...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the idea of water as an economic good. In the past several decades, there has been greater recognition that how humans manage water scarcity and its competing uses must change. This new perspective is reflected in the International Conference on Water and the Environment's (ICWE) 1992 Dublin Statement on Water and Sustainable...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on the global management of water resources. There are two pressing global issues emerging from the current water paradox: potential conflicts over transboundary water resources and “water grabbing.” To a large extent, the problems associated with water grabbing have their roots in the mismanagement of water globally. If adequa...
Chapter
This chapter assesses the role of innovation in averting the global water crisis. Recent technical advances—such as desalinization of saltwater, geographical information systems (GIS), and remote sensing—have the potential for managing and increasing freshwater supplies. There is also a new generation of urban water supply systems that can improve...
Chapter
This concluding chapter looks at the future of water. There are two possible paths for managing water. First, if the world continues with inadequate governance and institutions, incorrect market signals, and insufficient innovations to improve efficiency and manage competing demands, most chronic water and scarcity problems will continue to worsen....
Chapter
This introductory chapter provides an overview of the water paradox. Water is essential to life and freshwater on this planet has always been limited. This would suggest that, if water is the most valuable commodity for humans and it is growing scarcer because of its increasing use, then humans ought to be taking care of its main source—freshwater...
Book
Water is essential to life, yet humankind's relationship with water is complex. For millennia, we have perceived it as abundant and easily accessible. But water shortages are fast becoming a persistent reality for all nations, rich and poor. With demand outstripping supply, a global water crisis is imminent. This book argues that our water crisis i...
Chapter
This chapter studies the reform of water institutions and governance. Reforming governance and institutions to meet the challenge of growing water scarcity and competing demands is at the heart of the solution to the water paradox. Water governance consists of the processes and institutions by which decisions that affect water are made. Institution...
Chapter
This chapter explores the social and economic implications of rising global water use and scarcity. In the near future, many countries, regions, and populations may face rising costs of exploiting additional water resources that could constrain growth as well as make it increasingly difficult to meet the needs of those poor populations and countrie...
Article
Full-text available
Today, more than ever, ‘Spaceship Earth’ is an apt metaphor as we chart the boundaries for a safe planet¹. Social scientists both analyse why society courts disaster by approaching or even overstepping these boundaries and try to design suitable policies to avoid these perils. Because the threats of transgressing planetary boundaries are global, lo...
Article
The natural environment is now commonly viewed as a form of capital asset, or natural capital. Also included are ecosystems that provide important goods and services to the economy. Managing natural capital has consequences for sustainable development. However, there are contrasting weak versus strong sustainability views, which in turn have implic...
Article
To make green investments pay off, policymakers must learn from past mistakes and stop subsidizing polluters, urges Edward B. Barbier. To make green investments pay off, policymakers must learn from past mistakes and stop subsidizing polluters, urges Edward B. Barbier.
Article
Land is one of the few productive assets owned by the rural poor, and almost all such households engage in some form of agriculture. Over 2000–2010 the rural poor on degrading agricultural land increased in low-income countries and in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Although degradation threatens the livelihoods of the poor, this interaction is...
Article
Because their assets and income represent such a small share of national wealth, the impacts of climate change on poor people, even if dramatic, will be largely invisible in aggregate economic statistics such as the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Assessing and managing future impacts of climate change on poverty requires different metrics, and speci...
Chapter
As the overall aim of wetland restoration, enhancement, and creation is to recover valuable ecosystem goods and services, assessing these benefits is vital. In addition, as wetland restoration and creation are not "costless" activities, they must be assessed in terms of their cost effectiveness and their impacts on different stakeholders. Evaluatin...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we explore the use of trade policy in addressing transboundary stock pollution problems such as acid rain and water pollution. We show that a tariff determined by the current level of accumulated pollution can induce the time path of emissions optimal for the downstream (polluted) country. But if the upstream (polluting) country can...
Article
Full-text available
Given that few ecosystems on the Earth have been unaffected by humans, restoring them holds great promise for stemming the biodiversity crisis and ensuring ecosystem services are provided to humanity. Nonetheless, few studies have documented the recovery of ecosystems globally or the rates at which ecosystems recover. Even fewer have addressed the...

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Valuation and incentives work on watersheds and hydrological services