Edmund W. Cheng

Edmund W. Cheng
City University of Hong Kong | CityU · Department of Public Policy

PhD (LSE)

About

43
Publications
24,270
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
519
Citations
Introduction
I am an associate professor in comparative politics at City University of Hong Kong. My research interests include contentious politics, risk assessment, political communication and research methods. My work has appeared in Political Communication, Political Studies, British Journal of Social Psychology, Sociological Methodology, Information, Communication & Society, Journal of Medical Internet Research, Mobilization, The China Quarterly and The China Journal. Visit edmundwcheng.com
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - August 2019
Hong Kong Baptist University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
October 2011 - December 2015

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
Full-text available
Much contemporary social mobilization is digitally enabled. Digital media may provide the communication platforms on which supporters deliberate movement goals, share information, discuss tactics, and generate discourses in response to ongoing happenings. Yet digital media’s capability to serve these functions should depend on platform-specific aff...
Article
Full-text available
Does life satisfaction (LS) predict people’s likelihood of participating in politics? Although the relationship between LS and political participation (PP) has been widely debated, its correlation and causality remain inconclusive. We contribute to the literature by exploring the moderation effect of post-materialist value orientation. By conceptua...
Article
Full-text available
Past studies have shown that disease threat increases people's hostility towards immigrants. However, in our survey (N = 9571) conducted in five advanced Asian economies during the outbreak of COVID‐19, we found that COVID‐19 vulnerability was positively associated with support for immigration. Drawing on insight from policy feedback theories, we p...
Article
Full-text available
Protest survey is a standard tool for scholars to understand protests. However, while protest survey methods are well-established, the occurrence of spontaneous and leaderless protests has created new challenges for researchers. Not only do their unpredictable occurrences hinder planning, their fluidity also creates problems in obtaining representa...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives To investigate whether social trust is associated with more stress symptoms among middle-aged and older adults in six East and Southeast Asia regions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods This multi-region study used cross-sectional survey data collected in May 2020. Participants were a probability-based internet sample of adults aged 5...
Article
Full-text available
How political violence emerges, why people support it, and how authorities can address it without escalating further radicalization remain an ongoing debate. In this study, we develop a quantitative model to predict violence endorsement as a function of repression severity, group identification, and individual emotions. We situate our investigation...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Although timely and accurate information during the COVID-19 pandemic is essential for containing the disease and reducing mental distress, an infodemic, which refers to an overabundance of information, may trigger unpleasant emotions and reduce compliance. Prior research has shown the negative consequences of an infodemic during the pa...
Article
Full-text available
A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11205-021-02718-3
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the origins and dynamics of an extraordinary wave of protests in Hong Kong in 2019-2020. Despite lacking visible political opportunities and organizational resources, the movement drew resilient, mass participation unparalleled in the city's history and much of the world. Drawing from original sets of onsite and online datasets,...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the roles of professional networks in mass protests. The extensive participation of professionals in the anti-extradition movement in Hong Kong, using their professional expertise, specialized networks and institutional positions, constituted a novel form of collective action. Based on framing analysis of sectoral petitions and...
Article
Full-text available
The extant social movement literature tends to regard the youth as radical actors and senior citizens as conservative actors. However, the Anti-Extradition Bill Movement in Hong Kong exhibited strong solidarity among protesters across generations, despite the radicalization of protest actions over an extended period. These phenomena contradict Hong...
Article
Full-text available
Reviewing the extant literature on China's public sphere from the perspective of 20th-century history and social science, this introductory essay argues for the continued relevance of studying the publications and public practices associated with knowledge communities. By steering away from normative definitions and by envisaging publicness as a pr...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has stalled the world’s economic activities and obscures the future of economic and trade. Many observers concern that the pandemic would result in growing protectionist attitudes in trade. This article provides one of the first systematic assessments to examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the public’s trade prefere...
Article
Full-text available
This paper surveys the process of discursive contestation by intellectual agents in Hong Kong that fostered a counter-public sphere in China's offshore. In the postwar era, Chinese exiled intellectuals leveraged the colony's geopolitical ambiguity and created a displaced community of loyalists/dissenters that supported independent publishing venues...
Article
Full-text available
Inglehart’s theory of postmaterialism outlines the influence of intergenerational value change on social change. While the sense of security during a formative period is an essential context for postmaterialist values to be bred among the younger generation in democratic states, social protests and political instability are common in some hybrid re...
Article
Full-text available
The Anti-Extradition Law Amendment Bill (Anti-ELAB) movement in Hong Kong was marked by a significant degree of tactical radicalisation in its first six months. Yet the movement also succeeded in maintaining a high degree of solidarity and public support. This article explains how tactical radicalisation and public receptiveness toward radical acti...
Article
Full-text available
The East Asian experience in tackling COVID-19 has been highly praised, but this high-level generalisation neglects variation in pandemic response measures adopted across countries as well as the socio-political factors that shaped them. This paper compares the early pandemic response in Singapore and Hong Kong, two Asian city-states of similar siz...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the Anti-Extradition Bill (Anti-ELAB) Movement and uses claim making and claim transformation as a window to look at ideological struggle in Hong Kong. The analysis recounts the emergence of a specific configuration of movement claims: the supplementation of the moderate “Five Demands” with the abstract slogan “Revolution of O...
Article
Full-text available
United front work has long been an important tool through which the Chinese Communist Party exercises political influence in Hong Kong. While existing works have revealed the history, actors, and impact of united front work in this semiautonomous city, few studies have focused on its changing structure and objectives in the post-handover period. Us...
Preprint
This paper examines the origins and dynamics of an extraordinary wave of protests in Hong Kong in 2019 and 2020. Despite lacking visible political opportunities and organisational resources, the movement drew prolonged, mass participation unparalleled in the city’s history and much of the world. Drawing on onsite and online data, we conceptualise H...
Preprint
Full-text available
People may experience a heightened level of stress reactions during a pandemic event and in an isolated social environment. A multi-national survey about such mental health information about COVID-19 was conducted in May 2020 across six Asian regions: Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and Thailand. Data were collected from a populati...
Article
Full-text available
Hong Kong’s ‘One Country, Two Systems’ formula has been hailed as an unprecedented political experiment in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) for how it formulates a semi-autonomous jurisdiction within a unitary, single-party state. While the formula has remained constitutionally valid two decades after its implementation, it has been trapped in...
Article
Full-text available
Collective memory shapes collective identity in social movements, yet the cultural process of transforming collective memory into collective identity and actions is anything but linear. While preserving an established historical narrative can maintain movement solidarity, this process is actively contested by multiple actors, which may weaken solid...
Chapter
This chapter analyzes the roots of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) regime's learning curve in managing popular contention and the mechanisms that have enabled the regime to develop its authoritarian structure and practices. It first defines Hong Kong's hybrid regime in terms of its liberal–autocratic and central–local contradict...
Article
Full-text available
After a period of movement abeyance since the Umbrella Movement, millions of Hong Kong citizens took to the streets in summer 2019 to protest against a proposed extradition bill that would allow the Hong Kong authorities to extradite its citizens to mainland China. Initially calling for the withdrawal of the impending bill, the mass protests soon e...
Article
Full-text available
Media and Protest Logics in the Digital Era: The Umbrella Movement in Hong Kong By Francis L. F. Lee and Joseph M. Chan New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018 ix + 263 pp. £19.99 ISBN 978-0-19-085678-6 - Volume 238 - Edmund W. Cheng
Book
This volume examines the most spectacular struggle for democracy in post-handover Hong Kong. Bringing together scholars with different disciplinary focuses and comparative perspectives from mainland China, Taiwan and Macau, one common thread that stitches the chapters is the use of first-hand data collected through on-site fieldwork. This study une...
Article
Full-text available
Despite sustaining enviable economic growth after its Handover to China, Hong Kong has witnessed an increasingly contentious society where citizens Have continued to protest for their political freedoms. This article is an attempt to rethink the ways of studying popular contention in a subnational, hybrid context, focusing on the case of Hong Kong....
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the antecedent and contingent causes sparking the Umbrella Movement in Hong Kong. Spurred by two contingent events generating pre-emptive and backlash mobilization, the movement is a spontaneous transformation of the staged Occupy Central campaign. Based on an onsite survey (n = 1681) and in-depth interviews (n = 18), this paper...
Article
Full-text available
Protest activists employ various strategies to challenge regimes, and regimes deploy multifaceted tactics to respond to such challenges. Existing studies on regime protest responses focus on repression and concession, but little attention is devoted to toleration, which is often regarded as government inaction. Drawing on primary sources and interv...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the diffusion of activism in post-colonial Hong Kong through the lens of the political regime and eventful analysis. It first reveals the institutional foundations of the hybrid regime that allowed the creation of a nascent movement society. It then explains how the historic 1 July rally in 2003 and a series of critical events s...
Article
Full-text available
This study considers the conditions under which China's massive internal migration and urbanisation have resulted in relatively governed, less contentious, and yet fragile migrant enclaves. Shenzhen, the hub for rural-urban migration and a pioneer of market reform, is chosen to illustrate the dynamics of spatial contestation in China's sunbelt. Thi...
Article
Full-text available
An enduring question with regard to the voluntary sector is how it can nurture civic engagement and provide public goods. A World Heritage listing for Penang highlights this question by revealing a vibrant civil society network that has made heritage conservation an issue for public discourse and policy agenda. This paper discusses how the marginal...
Article
Full-text available
Conserving built heritage involves competition for land and ongoing costs. The incentive to preserve is thus particularly low in areas where economic considerations prevail and conservation mechanisms are centralised. This used to be the case in Hong Kong. However, a series of civil conservation efforts since 2003, featuring judicial review, civil...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
This project will compare public health measures and citizen responses across six regions in East and Southeast Asia, i.e., Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Using a longitudinal survey with experimental designs, this project will: 1) examine how these regions responded to the pandemic; 2) examine citizens’ attitudes and behaviors in coping with the crisis, as well as their views and expectations towards public health measures; and 3) evaluate the impact of the pandemic on their mental, economic, and social well-being.
Project
Borrowing from the cultural and communication approaches in social movement studies, this study will examine the formation of new meanings and networks during what perceived to be a leaderless movement in Hong Kong. The alternative lens infers that culture or digital tool is not only a formative condition of social movements, but also comprises a constitutive role in shaping movement characteristics and dynamics.
Project
This project will identify the conditions that account for the revival of CHTAs across the four metropolises in East and Southeast Asia and explain why CHTAs are more robust in some regions than in others. Revival is defined as whether these century-old organizations have expanded in size, territory, or service and transcended class, generation or border. We will also examine whether the restructuring originated with the immigrants’ voluntary actions, was incentivized by Chinese capital investment, was appropriated by state actions.