Edith Hall

Edith Hall
King's College London | KCL · Department of Classics

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47
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622
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Publications

Publications (47)
Article
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The recent general election has exposed the danger inherent in vote-based democracies – that they inevitably entail large disaffected minorities being excluded from executive power. The ancient Greek inventors of democracy vigorously debated this issue, having painful historical experience of it (recorded by Thucydides) and theoretical solutions (d...
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The earliest ancient Greek text to narrate the resolution of a large-scale conflict by judicial means is Aeschylus’s tragedy Eumenides , first performed in Athens in 458 BC. After explaining the historical context in which the play was performed—a context of acute civic discord and the imminent danger of an escalation of reciprocal revenge killings...
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A vase fragment from Olbia has been recognized in recent years as a key piece of evidence for the tragic chorus in fifth-century Athenian drama, especially because it shows the use of masks by dancers in such a chorus. This article provides the first clear illustration of the fragment, revealing much detail about the dress of the dancers, with a ra...
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This monograph is a cultural history of the performance, reception and influence of the ancient Greek tragedy Iphigenia in Tauris by Euripides. First produced in the late 5th century BCE in Athens, this play was one of the most influential of all the canonical classical dramas in antiquity until the fourth century CE and in the period between the R...
Chapter
This chapter explores classical Mediterranean thought on suffering through a detailed examination of one Greek tragedy, Sophocles’ Philoctetes, in which both moral philosophy and medicine also feature. Suffering in this play has no inherent metaphysical or ethical status, but it does raise the rather practical as well as ethical question of how oth...
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Roman Trier may first have begun to fall into architectural decay after the fall of the Roman Empire, but its buildings only began their current life as ruins with Napoleon Bonaparte. Roman Trier was reinvented at exactly the time when Karl Marx was growing up within its walls. Marx spent his childhood and adolescence in a house so near the Porta N...
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The multivalency of myth had lent it a particular attraction to authors and artists who wanted to draw parallels between different arenas of struggle for freedom and equal rights, especially universal suffrage. Yet the quest for mythical heroes who could be press-ganged into the abolitionist cause proved frustrating: experiments were conducted on s...
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Spartan helotage was important in framing the early British parliamentary motions, between 1791 and 1796 for abolition of the slave trade. Helotage, particularly illustrated from the evidence of Plutarch's Lycurgus, consistently appears as the primary ancient example of the inhumanity of servitude, cited both by some of those who wanted to argue fo...
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This study explores the numerous different ways in which we can understand the relationship between the real, social world in which the Athenians lived and the theatrical roles that they invented. In twelve studies of role types and the theatrical conventions that contributed to their creation - including women in childbirth, drowning barbarians, h...
Book
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This book addresses the huge impact on subsequent culture made by the wars fought between ancient Persia and Greece in the early 5th century BC. It brings together sixteen interdisciplinary essays, mostly by classical scholars, on individual trends within the reception of this period of history, extending from the wars' immediate impact on ancient...
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pathologies of some of its lesser characters. 2 Moreover, the ancient relationship between stage and prose romance forms part of the essential (although often disregarded) backdrop to the story of Greek tragedy in modern fiction; when the ancient novels were published in translation into modern languages during the Early Modern and Enlightenment er...
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This book studies the most important form of theatre in the entire Roman empire-pantomime, the ancient equivalent of ballet dancing. Performed for more than five centuries in hundreds of theatres from Portugal in the West to the Euphrates, Gaul to North Africa, solo male dancing stars-the ancient forerunners of Nijinsky, Nureyev and Baryshnikov-stu...
Chapter
It was ancient pantomime's destiny to play a seminal role in the emergence of classical ballet, and subsequently, in the twentieth century, of avantgarde Tanztheater. It is well known that the founding fathers of opera in the Florentine Camerata looked to ancient myth, and above all what they believed to have been the all-sung form taken by ancient...
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There is a possibility that one pantomime libretto based on a canonical tragedy does in fact survive. The candidate is a Latin hexameter poem, preserved only in a Barcelona papyrus, on the theme of Alcestis' death, familiar to the ancient world above all from Euripides' Alcestis. The metre of the poem is shared by the Aeneid, which is known to have...
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Classics as subject-area and a constituent of the curriculum stands in urgent need of redefining its role, now that so many courses are taught primarily, or indeed exclusively, through the medium of modern-language translations. This chapter argues that the phenomenon of the arrival of Greek and Roman authors in modern languages needs to be appreci...
Chapter
The prelims comprise: The Reasons for Suffering The Philosophical Signature The Metaphysical Chrysalis Death and Mystery The Spectator Bound The Reasons for Suffering The Philosophical Signature The Metaphysical Chrysalis Death and Mystery The Spectator Bound
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Classicists can legitimately argue that their right to be stakeholders in the new economies of the academy is based on the philosophical idea, first fully developed in Martin Heidegger's Being and Time (Sein und Zeit [1927]), that a key constitutive element of subjectivity is temporality. With the slightest degree of modification, the notion of tem...
Book
Full-text available
A history of the performance, adaptation, translation and influence of ancient Greek tragedy on British theatre and culture between the Restoration and World WAr I. Illustrated. Prize-nominated.
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Euripides' Medea has penetrated to parts of modernity most mythical figures have not reached. Since she first rolled off the printing presses half a millennium ago, she has inspired hundreds of performances, plays, paintings, and operas. Medea has murdered her way into a privileged place in the history of the imagination of the West, and can today...
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This article argues that our picture of the uses of Greek and Roman authors in nineteenth-century Britain will remain incomplete unless the popular and culturally subversive genre of classical burlesque, a staple of the mid-Victorian popular theatre, is taken seriously by scholars. Dozens of burlesques of ancient epic and tragedy were performed bet...
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If you lived in Reading in 1821, you might be tempted by the advertisement in your local newspaper for forthcoming attractions at the neighbourhood's commercial theatre. Should your taste encompass Greco-Roman themes, you might want to see ‘Monsieur DECOUR, the renowned FRENCH HERCULES!! Who will perform… FEATS AND EVOLUTIONS…’. If you preferred or...
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This article discusses two romantic tragedies set in ancient Greece, which were performed on the professional stage in London in the 1830s. They are the works of Thomas Noon Talfourd, a radical member of Parliament.Ion (Covent Garden Theatre 1836) was based on Euripides’ tragedy of the same name;The Athenian Captive (Haymarket Theatre 1838) assumes...
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Ancient Women - PomeroySarah B.(ed.): Women's History and Ancient History. Pp. xvi+317; 17 plates. Chapel Hill, London: University of North Carolina Press, 1991. Cased, $43.95 (Paper $15.35). - Volume 44 Issue 2 - Edith Hall
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Marxist Interpretations of Greek Literature - RosePeter W.: Sons of the Gods, Children of Earth: Ideology and Literary Form in Ancient Greece. Pp. xii + 412. Ithaca, N.Y. and London: Cornell University Press, 1992. $49.50 (Paper, $16.45). - Volume 43 Issue 1 - Edith Hall
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NippelWilfried: Griechen, Barbaren und ‘Wilde’: alte Geschichte und Sozialanthropologie. Pp. 218. Frankfurt am Main: Fischer Taschenbuch, 1990. Paper. - Volume 42 Issue 1 - Edith Hall
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Aristocratic Women in Tragedy - BouvrieSynnøve Des: Women in Greek Tragedy: An Anthropological Approach. (Symbolae Osloenses, Fasc. Suppl., 27.) Pp. 394. Oxford/Oslo: Oxford University Press/Norwegian University Press, 1990. £27.50. - Volume 42 Issue 1 - Edith Hall
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1st issued as a Clarendon Paperback Bibliogr. s. 225-249
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Barbarians in Greek Comedy - LongTimothy: Barbarians in Greek Comedy. Pp. xiii + 236. Carbondale, Ill.: Southern Illinois University Press, 1986. $29.95. - Volume 37 Issue 2 - Edith M. Hall

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