Ed Van Veen

Ed Van Veen
University of California, Los Angeles | UCLA · Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology

25.94
 · 
PhD

About

23
Publications
2,244
Reads
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1,296
Citations
Introduction
My work focuses on cancer genetics, tumor evolution, and response to chemotherapy. Specific questions I am interested in are: → How do mutations found in human cancers affect tumor progression in mouse models? → How do cancer cells lose their terminal differentiation and become more "stem-cell like" as tumors progress? → How do standard of care therapies produce unwanted side effects, and can this be avoided? To answer these questions, I've used genetics, RNA sequencing, single cell RNA sequencing, stereotaxic delivery of viruses, molecular biology, immunohistochemistry with high throughput quantitation, and biochemistry. R scripts and cellprofiler pipelines that I have written are at github: https://github.com/jevanveen
Research Experience
October 2016 - present
University of California, Los Angeles
Position
  • Project Scientist
September 2015 - October 2016
University of Utah
Position
  • Post-Doctoral Fellow
February 2012 - September 2015
University of California, San Francisco
Position
  • Post-Doctoral Fellow
Education
September 2003 - February 2012
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Field of study
  • Molecular Biology
October 1998 - June 2001
University of California, Davis
Field of study
  • Genetics, Mathematics

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Background: The commonly used laboratory rat, Rattus norvegicus, is unique in having multiple Sry gene copies found on the Y chromosome, with different copies encoding amino acid variations that influence the resulting protein function. It is not clear which Sry genes are expressed at the onset of testis differentiation or how their expression cor...
Article
Full-text available
Oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signalling in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) contributes to energy homeostasis by modulating physical activity and thermogenesis. However, the precise neuronal populations involved remain undefined. Here, we describe six neuronal populations in the mouse VMH by using single-cell RNA transcriptomics and in situ hy...
Article
Full-text available
Liver X receptors limit cellular lipid uptake by stimulating the transcription of inducible degrader of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (IDOL), an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets lipoprotein receptors for degradation. The function of IDOL in systemic metabolism is incompletely understood. Here we show that loss of IDOL in mice protects agains...
Article
Full-text available
Human lung adenocarcinoma exhibits a propensity for de-differentiation, complicating diagnosis and treatment, and predicting poorer patient survival. In genetically engineered mouse models of lung cancer, expression of the BRAFV600E oncoprotein kinase initiates the growth of benign tumors retaining characteristics of their cell of origin, AT2 pneum...
Article
Full-text available
Human lung adenocarcinoma exhibits a propensity for de-differentiation, complicating diagnosis and treatment, and predicting poorer patient survival. In genetically engineered mouse models of lung cancer, expression of the BRAFV600E oncoprotein kinase initiates the growth of benign tumors retaining characteristics of their cell of origin, AT2 pneum...
Preprint
Full-text available
Estrogen signaling in the central nervous system promotes weight loss by increasing thermogenesis and physical activity in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), but the precise neuronal populations regulating these aspects of energy expenditure remain unclear. Here we define the molecular and functional heterogeneity of the VMH using single cell RNA...
Article
Full-text available
The Braf proto-oncogene is a key component of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade and is a critical regulator of both normal development and tumorigenesis in a variety of tissues. In order to elucidate BRAF's differing roles in varying cell types, it is important to understand both the pattern and timing of BRAF expression. Here...
Data
FCS raw data files (used in making Fig 4A). Anti-DSred antibody. (FCS)
Data
FCS raw data files (used in making Fig 4A). Anti-Braf antibody. (FCS)
Data
FCS raw data files (used in making Fig 4B). FCS sorting strategy for western. (FCS)
Data
FCS raw data files (used in making Fig 4A). No primary antibody. (FCS)
Article
Full-text available
Axons navigate long distances through complex 3D environments to interconnect the nervous system during development. Although the precise spatiotemporal effects of most axon guidance cues remain poorly characterized, a prevailing model posits that attractive guidance cues stimulate actin polymerization in neuronal growth cones whereas repulsive cue...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the mechanisms by which cells coordinate their size with their ability to divide has long attracted the interest of biologists. The Target of Rapamycin (TOR) pathway is becoming increasingly recognized as a master regulator of cell size, however less is known how TOR activity might be coupled with the cell cycle. Here, we establish th...
Article
Full-text available
Vertebrate nervous system development requires the careful interpretation of many attractive and repulsive guidance molecules. For the incredibly complicated wiring diagram comprising the vertebrate nervous system to elaborate properly, the highly motile "growth cone" at the tip of an axon must sense extracellular embryonic cues and respond through...
Article
Full-text available
Although peripheral nerves can regenerate after injury, proximal nerve injury in humans results in minimal restoration of motor function. One possible explanation for this is that injury-induced axonal growth is too slow. Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is a regeneration-associated protein that accelerates axonal growth in vitro. Here, we have shown...
Article
Full-text available
Studying neurite guidance by diffusible or substrate bound gradients is challenging with current techniques. In this study, we present the design, fabrication and utility of a microfluidic device to study neurite guidance under chemogradients. Experimental and computational studies demonstrated the establishment of a steep gradient of guidance cue...
Article
Full-text available
Extension of neurites from a cell body is essential to form a functional nervous system; however, the mechanisms underlying neuritogenesis are poorly understood. Ena/VASP proteins regulate actin dynamics and modulate elaboration of cellular protrusions. We recently reported that cortical axon-tract formation is lost in Ena/VASP-null mice and Ena/VA...
Article
We generated mice that overexpress the sirtuin, SIRT1. Transgenic mice have been generated by knocking in SIRT1 cDNA into the beta-actin locus. Mice that are hemizygous for this transgene express normal levels of beta-actin and higher levels of SIRT1 protein in several tissues. Transgenic mice display some phenotypes similar to mice on a calorie-re...
Article
Mammalian cortical development involves neuronal migration and neuritogenesis; this latter process forms the structural precursors to axons and dendrites. Elucidating the pathways that regulate the cytoskeleton to drive these processes is fundamental to our understanding of cortical development. Here we show that loss of all three murine Ena/VASP p...
Article
Recent studies in Caenorhabditis elegans show that crossover interference, which usually limits the number of exchanges per meiotic bivalent to just 'one', requires the continuity of both homologs. One 'function' of crossover interference may be the prevention of crossover events that might not effectively hold homologs together.

Questions and Answers

Question & Answers (8)
Question
Price of $300+ seems like a lot for an online course, but obviously much more affordable than the in-person $3300. Is the course worth it?