Ed Baker

Ed Baker
Natural History Museum, London · Entomology

BSc (Hons) Physics

About

55
Publications
19,355
Reads
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357
Citations
Additional affiliations
December 2010 - December 2013
Natural History Museum, London
Position
  • eMonocot
December 2009 - present
International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature
International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature
Education
October 2004 - June 2007
Imperial College London
Field of study
  • Physics

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
Full-text available
We describe an online open repository and analysis platform, BioAcoustica (http://bio.acousti.ca), for recordings of wildlife sounds. Recordings can be annotated using a crowdsourced approach, allowing voice introductions and sections with extraneous noise to be removed from analyses. This system is based on the Scratchpads virtual research environ...
Article
Full-text available
The increasing transformation of biodiversity into a data-intensive science has seen numerous independent systems linked and aggregated into the current landscape of biodiversity informatics. This paper outlines how we can move forward with this programme, incorporating real time environmental monitoring into our methodology using low-power and low...
Article
Full-text available
The Scratchpad Virtual Research Environment (http://scratchpads.eu/) is a flexible system for people to create their own research networks supporting natural history science. Here we describe Version 2 of the system characterised by the move to Drupal 7 as the Scratchpad core development framework and timed to coincide with the fifth year of the pr...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Monitoring biodiversity is key to understanding what is changing and why. Recent developments in acoustic monitoring approaches have seen cheaper hardware, more advanced analytical tools, and moves towards standardisation of methods. However, the potential for acoustic monitoring to address key needs of policymakers has not yet been realised. In t...
Article
Full-text available
Bush-crickets (or katydids) of the genus Mecopoda are relatively large insects well-known for their sounds for centuries. Bioacoustic studies in India and China revealed a surprisingly large diversity of sound patterns. We extend these studies into the tropics of South East Asia using integrative taxonomy, combining song analysis, morphology of sou...
Article
Full-text available
After reviewing the published literature on sound production in insects, a standardised terminology and controlled vocabularies have been created. This combined terminology has potential for use in automated identification systems, evolutionary studies, and other use cases where the synthesis of bioacoustic traits from the literature is required. A...
Article
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There has been little research on novel approaches to digitising liquid-preserved natural history specimens stored in jars or vials. This paper discusses and analyses three different prototypes for high-throughput digitisation using cheap, readily available components. This paper has been written for other digitisation teams or curators who want to...
Article
Full-text available
Prompted by the discovery of an undescribed species of Phyllium Illiger, 1798 from within the Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom collection, the Phylliidae (Leaf Insects) of Palawan, Philippines are here reviewed. The new species Phyllium (Phyllium) saltonae Cumming, Baker, Le Tirant, & Marshall n. sp. is currently only known from femal...
Article
Full-text available
The Natural History Museum, London has a number of online databases that describe interactions between species, including the HOSTS database of lepidopteran host plants (Robinson et al. 2010) and a database of Dipterocarp Seed Predators. These databases were generally bespoke software, which has increased the technical work necessary to sustain the...
Article
Full-text available
A study of 100 papers from five journals that make use of bioacoustic recordings shows that only a minority (21%) deposit any of the recordings in a repository, supplementary materials section or a personal website. This lack of deposition hinders re-use of the raw data by other researchers, prevents the reproduction of a project's analyses and con...
Research
http://phasmida.speciesfile.org The Phasmida Species File (PSF) is a taxonomic database of the world's Phasmida (stick and leaf insects, known as walking sticks and walking leaves in the U.S.). There is full synonymic and taxonomic information for 3,350 valid species and 5,300 taxonomic names, 37,500 citations to 3,178 references, over 7,600 specim...
Article
Full-text available
Paraphanocles keratosqueleton was originally described by Stoll in 1788, although he did not use binominal nomenclature. The first valid publication of a name for this species, Mantis keratosqueleton, was published in Olivier 1792. Lichtenstein, presumably unaware of the work of Olivier, described Phasma cornutum Lichtenstein 1802 as an objective s...
Article
Full-text available
Among insects, Orthoptera are a group famous for communicating by sound. This is especially true for bush-crickets (or katydids; Tettigonioidea). All acoustically active species produce sound by rubbing the fore wings (tegmina) against each other, using a stridulatory file situated on the lower side of the left tegmen and a scraper formed by the in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Since the publication of Baker (2016) three additional burrow casts, unknown to the author, were located in the Natural History Museum, London (NHM) collection by George Beccaloni. These casts were provisionally identified as Gryllotalpa vineae . In order to establish whether this identification was correct a literature survey of the casts of mole...
Preprint
Full-text available
Since the publication of Baker (2016) three additional burrow casts, unknown to the author, were located in the Natural History Museum, London (NHM) collection by George Beccaloni. These casts were provisionally identified as Gryllotalpa vineae . In order to establish whether this identification was correct a literature survey of the casts of mole...
Article
Full-text available
There are approximately one hundred thousand aquatic insect species currently known to science and this figure is likely a significant underestimation. The ecology of aquatic insect groups has been studied due to their role as bioindicators of water quality and in the case of Diptera, their role as vectors of disease. Light trapping targets emergen...
Article
Full-text available
This report details work on the BioAcoustica project up to the end of March 2016. Functionality and datasets currently available are described and ongoing work is listed. Usage statistics are provided and future plans are presented. Outputs of the project are listed in appendices including a list of peer-reviewed papers generated by the project and...
Article
Full-text available
This report details work on the BioAcoustica project up to the end of March 2016. Functionality and datasets currently available are described and ongoing work is listed. Usage statistics are provided and future plans are presented. Outputs of the project are listed in appendices including a list of peer-reviewed papers generated by the project and...
Article
Full-text available
This report details work on the BioAcoustica project up to the end of March 2016. Functionality and datasets currently available are described and ongoing work is listed. Usage statistics are provided and future plans are presented. Outputs of the project are listed in appendices including a list of peer-reviewed papers generated by the project and...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The wasp subfamilies Amiseginae and Loboscelidiinae (Hymenoptera: Chrysididae) were last catalogued in Kimsey and Bohart (1991). The subfamilies are considered to be obligate egg parasitoids of the Phasmida (stick insects), which are known to be pests in many areas of the world (Baker 2015). Our lack of knowledge of these wasps, in par...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The Natural History Museum (NHM) sound archive contains recordings of Gryllotalpidae, and the NHM collection holds plaster casts of the burrows of two species. These recordings and burrows have until now not been made available through the NHM's collection database, making it hard for researchers to make use of these resources. New in...
Article
Full-text available
Stick insects have been reported as significant phytophagous pests of agricultural and timber crops since the 1880s in North America, China, Australia and Pacific Islands. Much of the early literature comes from practical journals for farmers, and even twentieth Century reports can be problematic to locate. Unlike the plaguing Orthoptera, there has...
Article
Full-text available
The use of notation and concepts from mathematical set theory is investigated as a method for describing species concepts, and potentially higher level taxa. These methods may facilitate the easy databasing of species concepts, allowing the concepts themselves to become citable through the provision of unique identifiers. The increase in unique ide...
Article
Full-text available
The use of notation and concepts from mathematical set theory is investigated as a method for describing species concepts, and potentially higher level taxa. These methods may facilitate the easy databasing of species concepts, allowing the concepts themselves to become citable through the provision of unique identifiers. The increase in unique ide...
Working Paper
Full-text available
The use of notation and concepts from mathematical set theory is investigated as a method for describing species concepts, and potentially higher level taxa. These methods may facilitate the easy databasing of species concepts, allowing the concepts themselves to become citable through the provision of unique identifiers. The increase in unique ide...
Article
Full-text available
Background Sound collections for singing insects provide important repositories that underpin existing research (e.g. Price et al. 2007 at http://bio.acousti.ca/node/11801; Price et al. 2010) and make bioacoustic collections available for future work, including insect communication (Ordish 1992), systematics (e.g. David et al. 2003), and automated...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report summarises work carried out on the Speckled Bush Cricket data logger project by Wil Bennett and Dave Chesmore at the University of York and Ed Baker at the Natural History Museum, who together designed and constructed-at the time of writing-a total of ten data logging devices to monitor the presence of Leptophyes punctatissima and other...
Article
Full-text available
We describe an implementation of the Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) standard that allows for the exchange of biodiversity information contained within the Scratchpads virtual research environment with external collaborators. Using this single archive file Scratchpad users can expose taxonomies, specimen records, species descriptions and a range of oth...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
One of the major flaws of conventional publishing of biodiversity research is the generally low accessibility and reuse of the published information and data. The continuing practice of publishing in non-machine-readable formats, such as paper and PDF, is one of the five causes of the “Publishing bottleneck”, a phenomenon comparable to the “taxonom...
Article
Full-text available
Many institutions and individuals use embedded metadata to aid in the management of their image collections. Many deskop image management solutions such as Adobe Bridge and online tools such as Flickr also make use of embedded metadata to describe, categorise and license images. Until now Scratchpads (a data management system and virtual research e...
Article
Full-text available
The International Commission of Zoological Nomenclature has used the Scratchpads platform (currently being developed and maintained by ViBRANT) as the foundation for its redesigned website and as a platform for engaging with its users. The existing Scratchpad tools, with extensions to provide additional functions, have allowed for a major transform...
Article
Full-text available
The biological and palaeontological communities have approached the problem of informatics separately, creating a divide between communities that is both technological and sociological in nature. In this paper we describe one new advance towards solving this problem - expanding the Scratchpads platform to deal with geological time. In creating this...
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Article
The NatSCA website has been upgraded to the Scratchpad system allowing for easier and quicker maintenance, and several new features. Although this article describes only the NatSCA website many of the principles and methods used are applicable to many different website projects (atomisation, search, metadata, link rot, reusing data, redirects, best...
Article
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List of online taxonomic resources for orthopteroid insects.
Article
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An index to the Blattodea Culture Group Newsletter Volumes 1-14 is provided. It includes a species and subject index, and an author index.
Article
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Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Archived project
Virtual research environments for biodiversity science.
Project
Project to provide online access to digitised bioacoustic collections with integrated analysis tools.
Project
Our aim is to develop and field-test technology that will enable the automated continuous monitoring of acoustic communities in a non-invasive and low cost way. We will focus on Orthoptera song (grasshoppers, crickets and bush-crickets) as a model system but in the longer term these techniques will be applicable across a wide range of acoustically communicating organisms. We will develop comparative analyses of Orthoptera song to inform the development of automatic acoustic observatories, which will then be field-tested to assess performance before dissemination. This will be achieved by pursuing a number of research objectives including the design of AAO devices, describing evolutionary relationships of Orthoptera and the evolution of song and to test systems in the field.