Ebru Soytemel

Ebru Soytemel
Aston University · Sociology and Policy

B.A, M.A, M.A., PhD

About

18
Publications
2,022
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24
Citations
Introduction
Ebru Soytemel is a Lecturer in Sociology at Aston University, Birmingham. Her PhD ( 2011, The University of Manchester) entitled: “Gentrification and Belonging in Istanbul” explored the ways in which urban policies, gentrification and socio-economic policies impact upon the class composition, housing, and patterns of belonging of different social classes in Istanbul, Turkey. Her interests include: social- economic inequality, gentrification and social-spatial exclusion, the relationship between social class and social-symbolic borders, migration and cultural participation. Ebru has experience of working with mixed methods with a particular interest in ethnographic research methods and multiple correspondence analysis.
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - present
Aston University
Position
  • Lecturer
November 2011 - December 2013
University of Oxford
Position
  • Research Associate
October 2011 - December 2013
University of Oxford
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Mainstream gentrification research predominantly examines experiences and motivations of the middle-class gentrifier groups, while overlooking experiences of non-gentrifying groups including the impact of in situ local processes on gentrification itself. In this paper, I discuss gentrification, neighbourhood belonging and spatial distribution of cl...
Article
Full-text available
This chapter explores how gentrifiers in Istanbul mobilise their social networks and social capital during the gentrification process, and how their networks are constructed through processes of “ place making” and belonging. In addition, this chapter aims to demonstrate how social capital and social networks work in practice during the gentrificat...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter examines the formation of ‘the housing market’ during the Fikirtepe Urban Transformation Project and focuses on the initial processes of bargaining. It scrutinises tactics and position takings of different actors against each other, such as the construction companies and the state bureaucrats, and counter actions of different homeowner...
Chapter
Full-text available
Reflecting on the way progressive protest rap music helped humanise the music industry by taking on global challenges such as incivility, poverty, violence, inequality and injustice, we discuss how management studies could embrace such insights from this field of emergent art. In particular, we explore how management studies, in the same way as pro...
Article
Full-text available
Bu yazı, mahallenin ve mekânların toplumsal ve fiziksel dönüşümünü göz önünde bulundurarak, Fener - Balat semtleri ve Balat Çarşısı örnekleri üzerinden kamusal alanda yer alan erkeklik temsillerinin oluşumuna sebep olan toplumsal ayrışmaları ve bu ayrışmaların mekân kullanımlarıyla mütekabiliyetini ele almayı hedefliyor. Yazının hikâye kısmında geç...
Chapter
The word ‘gentrification’, first coined by the sociologist Ruth Glass in London, is now half a century old, and over those decades has become one of the most controversial and divisive concepts in urban studies. What was once understood as an incremental process of embourgeoisement confined to specific inner-city neighbourhoods of the de-industrial...
Article
Istanbul has consistently been at the centre of academic research in Turkey. Since the 1950s, researchers have considered the city to be a microcosmic reflection of the social and urban change of the whole country. The 2013 protests in Gezi Park once again showed that Istanbul and its neighbourhoods hold important clues for wider social and economi...
Article
Full-text available
Gezi direnişinin ardından iktidar içinde yer alan ya da ona yakın politikacıların Gezi karşıtı söylemlerini, analizlerini ve yorumlarını giderek daha çok duymaya başladık. Her ne kadar bazı politikacılar - İçişleri Bakanı Muammer Güler gibi - vatandaşın hak aramasını ‘elbette meşru’ saysa da, bunun temel özgürlüklerin bir parçası olduğu gerçeğine k...
Article
Full-text available
Gezi hareketinin yurtdışındaki bazı “occupy” eylemlerinde evsizleri ve yoksulları arasına almayan, orta sınıfın temsiliyetine öncelik veren örneklere benzememesini ümit ediyorum. Hepimiz çapulcuyuz derken işin yoksullukla ilgili kısmını görmezden gelemeyiz.
Article
Is social class a central part of our contemporary life? Why have many scholars ceased to use social class as an explanatory tool, even though it played a vital role in the emergence of social theory? What happened to class analysis following the ‘turn’ to identity, gender and race? Understanding Social Inequality by Tim Butler and Paul Watt is an...
Article
Is social class a central part of our contemporary life? Why have many scholars ceased to use social class as an explanatory tool, even though it played a vital role in the emergence of social theory? What happened to class analysis following the ‘turn’ to identity, gender and race? Understanding Social Inequality by Tim Butler and Paul Watt is an...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Today, the twinned ideas of respect towards minorities’ rights and cultural diversity that have been projected as values derived from the European historical experience are facing well-documented challenges. These include: the current radicalisation of young people in Europe; processes questioning the meaningfulness of the European project; and the revival of tribal identities and separatism. These processes give cause to fundamentally rethink the idea of Europeanness as a culture of dialogue and mutual respect. CHIEF aims to build an effective dialogue between different stakeholders in order to facilitate a future of Europe based on more inclusive notions of cultural heritage and identity. The project is innovative in its approach to cultural literacy of young Europeans by privileging the importance of production and transition of cultural knowledge in both formal educational settings initiated from above, and a variety of informal human interactions. These informal interactions are often overlooked despite their strong influence on how knowledge about European culture is acquired by young people. The project proposes to explore them by building an inter-disciplinary, multi-sectoral and transnational partnership in nine countries in and outside the EU. Through its research activities and social interventions, CHIEF will have a substantial impact on policies and practices facilitating intercultural dialogue in Europe. It will contribute to understanding and enhancing cultural literacy for young people, resulting in greater appreciation of diversity. The project will lead to more effective use of European cultural heritage as a site of production, translation and exchange of heterogeneous cultural knowledge. Moreover, it will help to recognize existing innovative practices and develop a new organisational model to enhance cultural and inter-cultural competence of young Europeans. Finally, it will empower and bolster the innovative capacities of its beneficiaries.
Project
Turkish, Kurdish, and Cypriot-Turkish immigrants are among the most disadvantaged groups in London, with low educational attainment and employment rates. As such, these communities are subject to processes of social as well as economic stratification as well as conflicting dynamics of inclusion and exclusion, in which cultural practices, and concomitantly differentiated notions of taste and value, play a key role. Examining class-based processes of social/cultural distinction, belonging, and boundary-making amongst these immigrant groups, this project investigates under what circumstances patterns and practices of cultural participation facilitate social inclusion, or foster exclusion. Using a novel mixed methods approach combining surveys with extended life history interviews, it will explore how cultural consumption and accumulation strategies are developed by different immigrant groups, how these strategies are structured by national or local repertoires, and how specific practices are differentially valued through social identity formation.