Ebba Peterson

Ebba Peterson
Oregon State University | OSU · Department of Botany and Plant Pathology

PhD

About

8
Publications
1,199
Reads
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74
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2014 - present
Oregon State University
Position
  • Research Associate
September 2013 - present
Oregon State University
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Forest Insect and Disease Management (graduate and upper-division undergraduate)
February 2012 - February 2014
Oregon State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
June 2010 - December 2011
Oregon State University
Field of study
  • Botany and Plant Pathology
September 2006 - August 2009
Oregon State University
Field of study
  • Botany and Plant Pathology
September 2000 - June 2004
University of California, Santa Cruz
Field of study
  • Plant Biology

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
Widespread symptoms of root rot and mortality on Juniperus communis and Microbiota decussata were observed in two horticultural nurseries in Oregon, leading to the isolation of a Phytophthora sp. from diseased roots. Based on morphology and sequencing the internal transcribed spacer ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region, isolates were identified as the invasive pa...
Article
Full-text available
Phytophthora ramorum, cause of sudden oak death and ramorum leaf blight, can persist undetected in infested nurseries. Many conventional fungicides are effective in reducing or delaying symptom expression, but some may confound visual detection of infected plants. We tested film-forming polymers (FFPs) and surfactants for their ability to reduce in...
Article
Full-text available
An effort to eradicate Phytophthora ramorum , causal agent of sudden oak death, has been underway since its discovery in Oregon forests. Using an information-theoretical approach we sought to model yearly variation in the size of newly infested areas and dispersal distance. Maximum dispersal distances were best modeled by spring and winter precipit...
Article
Management of invasive species requires confidence in the detection methods used to assess expanding distributions, as well as an understanding of the dominant modes of spread. Lacking this basic biological information, during early stages of invasion management choices are often driven by available resources and the biology of closely related spec...

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