E. W. Tekwa

E. W. Tekwa
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Department of Zoology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

28
Publications
3,580
Reads
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136
Citations
Citations since 2016
26 Research Items
135 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060

Publications

Publications (28)
Preprint
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The sustainability of renewable resource harvesting may be threatened by environmental and socioeconomic changes that induce tipping points. Here, we propose a synthetic harvesting model with a comprehensive set of socioecological factors that have not been explored together, including market price and stock value, effort and processing costs, labo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Quantifying meritocracy directly is unfeasible because it requires large research efforts (such as surveys and controlled hiring experiments) that do not benefit the existing power structure. We circumvent this conundrum by proposing the use of openly accessible surname-publication data to quantify intergenerational representation in academia, whic...
Article
Full-text available
Seafood is one of the most internationally-traded food commodities. International markets can provide higher revenues that benefit small-scale fishing communities but can also drive a decline in fished populations. Collective action in collective organizations such as fishing cooperatives is thought to enhance the sustainability of fished populatio...
Article
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To facilitate evolutionary adaptation to climate change, we must protect networks of coral reefs that span a range of environmental conditions — not just apparent ‘refugia’.
Article
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Interest is growing in developing conservation strategies to restore and maintain coral reef ecosystems in the face of mounting anthropogenic stressors, particularly climate warming and associated mass bleaching events. One such approach is to propagate coral colonies ex situ and transplant them to degraded reef areas to augment habitat for reef‐de...
Preprint
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Species richness is an essential biodiversity variable indicative of ecosystem states and mass extinctions both contemporarily and in fossil records. However, limitations to sampling effort and spatial aggregation of organisms mean that surveys often fail to observe some species, making it difficult to estimate true richness and hinder the comparis...
Article
Full-text available
Species ranges are shifting in response to climate change, but most predictions disregard food-web interactions and, in particular, if and how such interactions change through time. Predator-prey interactions could speed up species range shifts through enemy release or create lags through biotic resistance. Here, we developed a spatially explicit m...
Article
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The rate of human-induced environmental change continues to accelerate, stimulating the need for rapid and science-based decision making. The recent availability of cyberinfrastructure, open-source data and novel techniques has increased opportunities to use ecological forecasts to predict environmental change. But to effectively inform environment...
Article
Full-text available
Objective To assess whether the basic reproduction number ( R 0 ) of COVID-19 is different across countries and what national-level demographic, social, and environmental factors other than interventions characterize initial vulnerability to the virus. Methods We fit logistic growth curves to reported daily case numbers, up to the first epidemic p...
Article
Full-text available
Corals are experiencing unprecedented decline from climate change-induced mass bleaching events. Dispersal not only contributes to coral reef persistence through demographic rescue but can also hinder or facilitate evolutionary adaptation. Locations of reefs that are likely to survive future warming therefore remain largely unknown, particularly wi...
Article
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Global environmental change is challenging species with novel conditions, such that demographic and evolutionary trajectories of populations are often shaped by the exchange of organisms and alleles across landscapes. Current ecological theory predicts that random networks with dispersal shortcuts connecting distant sites can promote persistence wh...
Preprint
Full-text available
Corals are experiencing unprecedented decline from climate change-induced mass bleaching events. Dispersal not only contributes to coral reef persistence through demographic rescue but can also hinder or facilitate evolutionary adaptation. Locations of reefs that are likely to survive future warming therefore remain largely unknown, particularly wi...
Article
Full-text available
This study empirically quantifies dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 establishment and early spread in Canada. We developed a transmission model that was simulation tested and fitted in a Bayesian framework to timeseries of new cases per day prior to physical distancing interventions. A hierarchical version was fitted to all provinces simultaneously to obtain...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: To assess whether the basic reproduction number (R0) of COVID-19 is different across countries and what national-level demographic, social, and environmental factors characterize initial vulnerability to the virus. Methods: We fit logistic growth curves to reported daily case numbers, up to the first epidemic peak. This fitting estimate...
Article
Full-text available
Preprint
Full-text available
Recent research provides an unprecedented account of the diversity and biomass of life, but the data also suggest unexplained patterns such as the co-dominance of very different life forms. We compile the planetary body size biomass spectrum across all taxa and investigate possible underlying forces. We find that small (10-14 g) and large (106 g) o...
Preprint
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Recent research has revealed the diversity and biomass of life on Earth, but how that biomass is distributed across body sizes remains unclear. We compile the present-day global body size-biomass spectra for the terrestrial, marine, and subterranean realms. To achieve this compilation, we pair biomass estimates with previously uncatalogued body siz...
Article
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Coral reefs are among the many communities believed to exhibit regime shifts between alternative stable states, single‐species dominance, and coexistence. Proposed drivers of regime shifts include changes in grazing, spatial clustering, and ocean temperature. Here, we distill the dynamic regimes of coral–macroalgal interaction into a three‐dimensio...
Preprint
Full-text available
Multiple attractors and alternative stable states are defining features of scientific theories in ecology and evolution, implying that abrupt regime shifts can occur and that outcomes can be hard to reverse. Here we describe a statistical inferential framework that uses independent, noisy observations with low temporal resolution to support or refu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Coral reefs are among the many communities believed to exhibit regime shifts between alternative stable states, single-species dominance, and coexistence. Proposed drivers of regime shifts include changes in grazing, spatial clustering, and ocean temperature. Here we distill the dynamic regimes of coral-macroalgal interaction into a three-dimension...
Article
Natural selection can favour cooperation, but it is unclear when cooperative populations should be larger than less cooperative ones. While experiments have shown that cooperation can increase population size, cooperation and population size can become negatively correlated if spatial processes affect both variables in opposite directions. We use a...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding why some renewable resources are overharvested while others are conserved remains an important challenge. Most explanations focus on institutional or ecological differences among resources. Here, we provide theoretical and empirical evidence that conservation and overharvest can be alternative stable states within the same exclusive-r...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial clustering is thought to favour the evolution of cooperation because it puts cooperators in a position to help each other. However, clustering also increases competition. The fate of cooperation may depend on how much cooperators cluster relative to defectors, but these clustering differences have not been the focus of previous models and e...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Microfluidic devices are used for many different types of experiments across the medical, ecological and evolutionary disciplines (Park et al., 2003; Keymer et al., 2008; Connell et al., 2013; Hol & Dekker, 2014). For example, microfluidic devices for microbial experiments require inoculation into smaller chambers that simulate natural microbial en...
Data
This revision includes new tables of mathematical symbol definitions and expanded derivations to clarify the main results of the JTB paper. The text is Chapter 1 of the Ph.D. thesis titled Spatial Theories and Experiments on the Evolution of Cooperation: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/R/-?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=139038&silo_library=GEN01
Article
Full-text available
Localized interactions are predicted to favour the evolution of cooperation amongst individuals within a population. One important factor that can localize interactions is habitat patchiness. We hypothesize that habitats with greater patchiness (greater edge-to-area ratio) can facilitate the maintenance of cooperation. This outcome is believed to b...

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