E. Rozanov

E. Rozanov
PMOD/WRC and IAC ETH Zurich · Climate

PhD

About

423
Publications
67,273
Reads
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13,837
Citations
Citations since 2017
147 Research Items
6781 Citations
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201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,0001,200
201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,0001,200
201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,0001,200
Additional affiliations
January 2001 - present
Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos
Position
  • Senior Researcher
January 2001 - present
ETH Zurich
Position
  • Senior Researcher
January 2001 - October 2014
Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos
Position
  • Senior Researcher

Publications

Publications (423)
Article
Full-text available
Energetic electron precipitation (EEP) is associated with solar activity and space weather and plays an important role in the Earth’s polar atmosphere. Energetic electrons from the radiation belt precipitate into the atmosphere during geomagnetic disturbances and cause additional ionization rates in the polar middle atmosphere. These induced atmosp...
Article
Full-text available
A previous model intercomparison of the Tambora aerosol cloud has highlighted substantial differences among simulated volcanic aerosol properties in the pre-industrial stratosphere and has led to questions about the applicability of global aerosol models for large-magnitude explosive eruptions prior to the observational period. Here, we compare the...
Article
Full-text available
There is evidence that the ozone layer has begun to recover owing to the ban on the production of halogenated ozone-depleting substances (hODS) accomplished by the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments (MPA). However, recent studies, while reporting an increase in tropospheric ozone from the anthropogenic NOx and CH4 and confirming t...
Preprint
Full-text available
This study evaluates the future evolution of atmospheric ozone between 2015 and 2099 simulated with the Earth System Model (ESM) SOCOLv4. Simulations have been performed based on two potential Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSP): the “middle-of-the-road” (SSP2-4.5) and “fossil-fueled” (SSP5-8.5) scenarios. In both scenarios, the model projects a de...
Preprint
Full-text available
Photolysis of molecular oxygen (O2) sustains the stratospheric ozone layer and is thereby protecting living organisms on Earth by absorbing harmful ultraviolet radiation. In the past, atmospheric O2 levels have not been constant, and their variations are thought to be responsible for the extinction of species due to the thinning of the ozone layer....
Preprint
Full-text available
It is now recognized and confirmed that the ozone layer shields the biosphere from dangerous solar UV radiation and is also important for the global atmosphere and climate. The observed massive ozone depletion forced the introduction of limitations on the production of halogen-containing ozone-depleting substances (hODS) by the Montreal Protocol an...
Article
Full-text available
Using nine chemistry‐climate and eight associated no‐chemistry models, we investigate the persistence and timing of cold episodes occurring in the Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere during the period 1980–2014. We find systematic differences in behavior between members of these model pairs. In a first group of chemistry models whose dynamical config...
Article
Full-text available
Cosmogenic isotopes are produced by cosmic rays mostly in the middle‐low atmosphere and then take part in the complicated processes of atmospheric transport and deposition that are different for the stratosphere and troposphere. Cosmogenic isotopes are continuously produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) with a hard energy spectrum and sporadically...
Article
Full-text available
The observed ozone layer depletion is influenced by continuous anthropogenic activity. This fact enforced the regular ozone monitoring globally. Information on spatial-temporal variations in total ozone columns (TOCs) derived by various observational methods and models can differ significantly due to measurement and modelling errors, differences in...
Preprint
Full-text available
There is evidence that the ozone layer has begun to recover owing to the ban on the production of halogen-containing ozone-depleting substances (hODS) accomplished by the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments (MPA). However, recent studies, while reporting an increase in tropospheric ozone and confirming the ozone recovery in the upper stratosphere,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Recent model inter-comparison studies highlighted model discrepancies in reproducing the climatic impacts of large explosive volcanic eruptions, calling into question the reliability of global aerosol model simulations for future scenarios. Here, we analyse the simulated evolution of the stratospheric aerosol plume following the well observed June...
Article
Full-text available
The meteorological response to the fluctuation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), known as the Mansurov effect, is well established. It is hypothesized that the IMF By fluctuation can modulate the atmospheric global electric circuit (GEC) over the polar regions and affect surface meteorology. The influence of electric charges on the rate o...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the response of the upper atmosphere to increased radiation following exceptional solar activity in September 2017. The active region of the Sun AR2673 has caused intense solar-terrestrial disturbance. This active region has generated several powerful X-class solar flares. The strongest outburst of the 24th solar activity cycle...
Article
Full-text available
Energetic particle precipitation leads to ionization in the Earth's atmosphere, initiating the formation of active chemical species which destroy ozone and have the potential to impact atmospheric composition and dynamics down to the troposphere. We report on one exceptionally strong high-energy electron precipitation event detected by balloon meas...
Article
Full-text available
Recent solar physics missions have shown the definite role of waves and magnetic fields deep in the inner corona, at the chromosphere-corona interface, where dramatic and physically dominant changes occur. HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging and Spectroscopy Explorer), the ambitious new generation ultra-high resolution, interferometric, and coronagraph...
Presentation
Full-text available
Strong eruptions on the Sun can accelerate charged particles, mostly protons to high energies, causing solar proton events (SPEs) when they hit Earth. Such energetic particles can precipitate upon the Earth’s atmosphere, mostly in polar regions because of the geomagnetic shielding. The strength of such precipitation span over many orders of magnitu...
Chapter
In recent decades, the response of surface meteorology to the variation of the By component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at high latitudes, known as the Mansurov effect, has been extensively studied. However, the role of the global electric circuit (GEC) in these processes is still unclear. Recent studies suggested that the response o...
Article
Full-text available
Precipitating auroral and radiation belt electrons are considered to play an important part in the natural forcing of the middle atmosphere with a possible impact on the climate system. Recent studies suggest that this forcing is underestimated in current chemistry‐climate models. The HEPPA III intercomparison experiment is a collective effort to a...
Article
Full-text available
Precipitating auroral and radiation belt electrons are considered an important part of the natural forcing of the climate system. Recent studies suggest that this forcing is underestimated in current chemistry‐climate models. The High Energy Particle Precipitation in the Atmosphere III intercomparison experiment is a collective effort to address th...
Article
Full-text available
Volcanic activity is a major natural climate forcing and an accurate representation of volcanic aerosols in global climate models is essential. This is a complex task involving many uncertainties in the model design and setup and observations. We analyze the performance of the aerosol‐chemistry‐climate model SOCOL‐AERv2 for three medium‐sized volca...
Article
Full-text available
The short-living cosmogenic isotope 7Be, which is produced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere, is often used as a tracer for atmospheric dynamics, with precise and high-resolution measurements covering the recent decades. The long-living isotope 10Be, as measured in polar ice cores with an annual resolution, is a proxy for long-term cosmic-ray variab...
Article
Full-text available
Our paper about the impacts of the Laschamps Geomagnetic Excursion 42,000 years ago has provoked considerable scientific and public interest, particularly in the so-called Adams Event associated with the initial transition of the magnetic poles. Although we welcome the opportunity to discuss our new ideas, Hawks’ assertions of misrepresentation are...
Article
Full-text available
Our study on the exact timing and the potential climatic, environmental, and evolutionary consequences of the Laschamps Geomagnetic Excursion has generated the hypothesis that geomagnetism represents an unrecognized driver in environmental and evolutionary change. It is important for this hypothesis to be tested with new data, and encouragingly, no...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we present a new version of the chemistry–climate model SOCOL-AERv2 supplemented by an iodine chemistry module. We perform three 20-year ensemble experiments to assess the validity of the modeled iodine and to quantify the effects of iodine on ozone. The iodine distributions obtained with SOCOL-AERv2-I agree well with AMAX-DOAS obser...
Preprint
Full-text available
Energetic particle precipitation leads to ionization in the Earth's atmosphere, initiating the formation of active chemical species which destroy ozone and have the potential to impact atmospheric composition and dynamics down to the troposphere. We report on one exceptionally strong high-energy electron precipitation event detected by balloon meas...
Article
Full-text available
This paper features the new atmosphere–ocean–aerosol–chemistry–climate model, SOlar Climate Ozone Links (SOCOL) v4.0, and its validation. The new model was built by interactively coupling the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model version 1.2 (MPI-ESM1.2) (T63, L47) with the chemistry (99 species) and size-resolving (40 bins) sulfate aerosol micro...
Article
Full-text available
The study investigates the representativeness of the total column ozone (TCO) measurements from the ground-based instruments located at the Arosa/Davos stations in Switzerland to analyze the global ozone layer behavior in the past and future. The statistical analysis of the satellite and model data showed a high correlation of the ground-based TCO...
Preprint
Full-text available
Short-living cosmogenic isotope 7Be, produced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere, is often used as a probe for atmospheric dynamics. Previously, modelling of the beryllium atmospheric transport was performed using simplified box-models or air back-tracing codes. While the ability of full atmospheric dynamics models to model beryllium transport was de...
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper features the new Atmosphere-Ocean-Aerosol-Chemistry-Climate Model SOCOLv4.0 and its validation. The new model was built by interactively coupling the MPI-ESM1.2 Earth System Model (T63, L47) with the chemistry (99 species) and size-resolving (40 bins) sulfate aerosol microphysics modules from the Aerosol-Chemistry-Climate Model SOCOL-AER...
Article
Full-text available
As part of the Model Intercomparison Project on the climatic response to Volcanic forcing (VolMIP), several climate modeling centers performed a coordinated pre-study experiment with interactive stratospheric aerosol models simulating the volcanic aerosol cloud from an eruption resembling the 1815 Mt. Tambora eruption (VolMIP-Tambora ISA ensemble)....
Article
Full-text available
Reversing the field Do terrestrial geomagnetic field reversals have an effect on Earth's climate? Cooper et al. created a precisely dated radiocarbon record around the time of the Laschamps geomagnetic reversal about 41,000 years ago from the rings of New Zealand swamp kauri trees. This record reveals a substantial increase in the carbon-14 content...
Article
Full-text available
Supplementary Material for 'A global environmental crisis 42,000 years ago' Geological archives record multiple reversals of Earth’s magnetic poles, but the global impacts of these events, if any, remain unclear. Uncertain radiocarbon calibration has limited investigation of the potential effects of the last major magnetic inversion, known as the...
Article
Full-text available
It is well-known that energetic particle precipitations during solar proton events increase ionization rates in the middle atmosphere enhancing the production of hydrogen oxide radicals (HO x ) involved in the catalytic ozone destruction cycle. There are many studies where the contribution of energetic particles to the formation of hydrogen oxide r...
Article
Full-text available
Water vapor (H2O) is the source of reactive hydrogen radicals in the middle atmosphere, whereas carbon monoxide (CO), being formed by CO2 photolysis, is suitable as a dynamical tracer. In the mesosphere, both H2O and CO are sensitive to solar irradiance (SI) variability because of their destruction/production by solar radiation. This enables us to...
Article
Atmospheric electric fields (AEFs) are produced by both natural processes and electrical infrastructure and are increasingly recognized to influence and interfere with various organisms and biological processes, including human well-being. Atmospheric electric fields, in particular electromagnetic fields (EMFs), currently attract a lot of scientifi...
Poster
The ozone layer is well observed since the 1930s from the ground and, since the 1980s, by satellite-based instruments. The evolution of ozone in the past is important because of its dramatic influence on the biosphere and humans but has not been known for most of the time, except for some measurements of near-surface ozone since the end of the 19th...
Article
Full-text available
We present an analysis of the ionosphere and thermosphere response to Solar Proton Events (SPE) and magnetospheric proton precipitation in January 2005, which was carried out using the model of the entire atmosphere EAGLE. The ionization rates for the considered period were acquired from the AIMOS (Atmospheric Ionization Module Osnabrück) dataset....
Preprint
Full-text available
As part of the Model Intercomparison Project on the climatic response to Volcanic forcing (VolMIP), several climate modeling centers performed a coordinated pre-study experiment with interactive stratospheric aerosol models simulating the volcanic aerosolcloud from an eruption resembling the 1815 Mt Tambora eruption (VolMIP-Tambora ISA ensemble). T...
Article
Full-text available
Reliable ozone trends after 2000 are essential to detect early ozone recovery. However, the long-term ground-based and satellite ozone profile trends reported in the literature show a high variability. There are multiple reasons for variability in the reported long-term trends such as the measurement timing and the dataset quality. The Payerne Swit...
Article
Full-text available
The stratospheric ozone plays an important role in the protection of the biosphere from the dangerous ultraviolet radiation of the sun [...]
Preprint
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Ozone profile measurements collected at L'Aquila (Italy, 42.4° N) during seventeen years of radio-sounding (2000–2016) are presented here, with an analysis of derived trends. Model results from the SPARC-CCMI exercise are used in parallel to highlight the physical and chemical mechanisms regulating mid-latitude ozone trends. The statistically signi...
Article
Full-text available
We present a study of atmospheric electricity using the chemistry‐climate model SOCOL considering ionization by solar energetic particles during an extreme solar proton event (SPE), galactic cosmic rays (GCR), and terrestrial radon (Rn‐222). We calculate the global distribution of the atmospheric conductivity and fair‐weather downward current densi...
Article
Full-text available
Our direct knowledge of solar eruptive events is limited to several decades and does not include extreme events, which can only be studied by the indirect proxy method over millennia, or by a large number of Sun‐like stars. There is a gap, spanning 1–2 orders of magnitude, in the strength of events between directly observed and reconstructed ones....
Preprint
Full-text available
Our direct knowledge of solar eruptive events is limited to several decades and does not include extreme events, which can only be studied by the indirect proxy method over millennia, or by a large number of sun-like stars. There is a gap, spanning 1--2 orders of magnitude, in the strength of events between directly observed and reconstructed ones....
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. Multi-instrument comparison analyses are essential to assess the long-term stability of data records by estimating the drift and bias of instruments. The ozone profile dataset from the SOMORA microwave radiometer (MWR) in Payerne, Switzerland, was compared with profiles from the GROMOS MWR in Bern, Switzerland, satellite instruments (MLS,...
Article
Full-text available
The ozone layer is well observed since the 1930s from the ground and, since the 1980s, by satellite-based instruments. The evolution of ozone in the past is important because of its dramatic influence on the biosphere and humans but has not been known for most of the time, except for some measurements of near-surface ozone since the end of the 19th...
Article
Full-text available
The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays critical roles within the troposphere, such as determining the lifetime of methane (CH4), yet is challenging to model due to its fast cycling and dependence on a multitude of sources and sinks. As a result, the reasons for variations in OH and the resulting methane lifetime (τCH4), both between models and in time, ar...
Article
Full-text available
The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) outgoing longwave flux over the 9.6 µm ozone band is a fundamental quantity for understanding chemistry–climate coupling. However, observed TOA fluxes are hard to estimate as they exhibit considerable variability in space and time that depend on the distributions of clouds, ozone (O3), water vapor (H2O), air temperature...