E. Parmentier

E. Parmentier
University of Liège | ulg · Department of of Biology, Ecology and Evolution

Professor

About

220
Publications
66,538
Reads
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4,311
Citations
Introduction
Laboratory web page: http://www.morfonct.uliege.be The laboratory of Functional and Evolutionary Morphology has a long tradition in the study of musculo-skeletal systems. The starting point of our unit research concerns the ecomorphology. I am particularly interested in the ways and mechanisms animals use to live in their environment and how the species interact. We aim to understand the (functional) morphology and evolution of Teleost fishes in order to understand how organisms can adapt to th
Additional affiliations
October 2011 - present
University of Liège
Position
  • Professor (Full)
August 2009 - March 2010
University of South Florida
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Familiarisation to ABR
October 2007 - September 2011
University of Liège
Position
  • Research Associate - F.R.S.-FNRS

Publications

Publications (220)
Chapter
Full-text available
Fishes have evolved multiple mechanisms for sound production, many 5 of which utilize sonic muscles that vibrate the swimbladder or the rubbing of bony 6 elements. Sonic muscles are among the fastest muscles in vertebrates and typically 7 drive the swimbladder to produce one sound cycle per contraction. These muscles 8 may be extrinsic, typically e...
Article
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The underwater environment is more and more being depicted as particularly noisy, and the inventory of calling fishes is continuously increasing. However, it currently remains unknown how species share the soundscape and are able to communicate without misinterpreting the messages. Different mechanisms of interference avoidance have been documented...
Article
Full-text available
The term exaptation introduced by Stephen J. Gould and Elizabeth Vrba has been used infrequently. The high diversity of sound-producing mechanisms in fishes highlights a recurrent use of this process in unrelated taxa. We propose that sonic evolution typically involves exaptations: in many fish taxa, sound production was acquired by the independent...
Article
Covering more than 65% of the Earth surface, the deep sea (200–11,000 m depth) is the largest biotope on Earth, yet it remains largely unexplored. The biology of its communities is still poorly understood, and many species are still to be discovered. Despite this, deep‐sea fish are already threatened by our exploitation and their conservation is ha...
Article
Although molecular methods and bioacoustical analysis have been used to uncover cryptic species, the combination of both methodologies is still rare. The humbug damselfish complex, Dascyllus aruanus, is composed of at least two species with Dascyllus aruanus in the Pacific Ocean and Dascyllus abudafur in the Indian Ocean. However, genetic data sugg...
Chapter
Full-text available
ll anemonefish species can produce two types of sounds. The first class concerns agonistic sounds that are produced during territory defence and probably to establish social hierarchy between individuals. The second class relates to submissive sounds that are emitted in reaction to aggressive acts by dominant individuals. In both types of sounds, i...
Article
Full-text available
Living cetaceans are ecologically diverse and have colonized habitats ranging from rivers and estuaries to the open ocean. This ecological diversity is strongly associated with variation of vertebral morphology. Interestingly, intraspecific ecological specialization between coastal and offshore environments has also been described for several speci...
Article
In some fish species, sex is determined by the combination of genetic and environmental factors. In most species concerned, extreme temperatures during the sensitive period of sex differentiation drives masculinization, independently of the female sex chromosomes. In Nile tilapia (XY male heterogamety), XX juveniles exposed to high temperatures (>3...
Article
This study investigates the sounds and the anatomy of the sound‐producing organ in the male and female sand‐dwelling cusk‐eel Parophidion vassali. Although both sexes have similar external phenotype, they can be distinguished by their sonic apparatus and sounds. As in many Ophioidei, Parophidion vassali presents a panel of highly derived characters...
Article
Cichlid radiations often harbour closely related species with overlapping niches and distribution ranges. Such species sometimes hybridise in nature, which raises the question how they can coexist. This also holds for the Tanganyika mouthbrooders Ophthalmotilapia ventralis and O. nasuta. Earlier studies found indications of asymmetrical hybridisati...
Article
Hypostomus is the most diverse genus within Loricariidae. These catfish species exhibit a very conservative morphology with relatively few external characteristics that differ between different species. In consequence, there is a challenge to understand the distinction of species of this genus. This study aims to describe the sounds produced by ten...
Article
1. Sound production represents an integral part of social communication in many teleost fish; however, few studies have investigated the structure, organization and variability of fish sounds at the community level. 2. Fish acoustic community structure was recorded simultaneously in three sites located along the Mediterranean basin within the ende...
Article
Among piranhas, different species are able to produce sounds but may utilize different mechanisms. In all species, the sound-producing muscle originates on the second vertebra, but the insertion differs. Pygopristis denticulata can produce two kinds of pulsed sounds emitted in trains. Its sound production mechanism is mainly based on a muscle bundl...
Article
Reproduction involves multiple complex behaviours and the effects of familiarity on such social interactions are seldom described in fish. This is particularly true for sound production and communication within aggressive or non-aggressive context. Here we explore the effects of a common garden rearing without parental care of two closely related c...
Article
Full-text available
We have used a lately established workflow to quantify rhythms of three fish sound types recorded in different areas of the Mediterranean Sea. So far, the temporal structure of fish sound sequences has only been described qualitatively. Here, we propose a standardized approach to quantify them, opening the path for assessment and comparison of an o...
Preprint
Full-text available
A bstract Cichlid radiations often harbour closely related species with overlapping niches and distribution ranges. Such species sometimes hybridise in nature, which raises the question how can they coexist. This also holds for the Tanganyika mouthbrooders Ophthalmotilapia ventralis and O. nasuta . Earlier studies found indications of asymmetrical...
Article
In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic led to government-enforced limits on activities worldwide, causing a marked reduction of human presence in outdoors environments, including in coastal areas that normally support substantial levels of boat traffic. These restrictions provided a unique opportunity to quantify the degree to which anthropogenic noise con...
Article
Full-text available
In piranhas, sounds are produced through the vibration of the swim bladder wall caused by the contraction of bilateral sonic muscles. Because they are solely innervated by spinal nerves, these muscles likely evolved from the locomotor hypaxial musculature. The transition from a neuromuscular system initially shaped for slow movements (locomotion) t...
Article
Full-text available
The ability of different marine species to use acoustic cues to locate reefs is known, but the maximal propagation distance of coral reef sounds is still unknown. Using drifting antennas (made of a floater and an autonomous recorder connected to a hydrophone), six transects were realized from the reef crest up to 10 km in the open ocean on Moorea i...
Article
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Many sounds produced by fishes remain to be described. Understanding sound production for vocal species would permit the development of passive acoustic monitoring of fish diversity. The present study investigated sound production in the glassy sweeper Pempheris schomburgkii in Guadeloupe reefs, French West Indies. Two recording approaches were use...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to produce sounds for acoustic communication is well known in different grunt species (Haemulidae). However, most of the sounds have not been described and the sound-producing mechanism of very few grunt species has been deeply studied. Additional data is needed to search for synapomorphy in the sonic mechanism. This study describes aco...
Article
Full-text available
A recurrent question arising in fish bioacoustics research concerns the number of vocal fish species that may exist. Although it is not possible to provide a precise globally valid number, an estimation based on recordings already collected at coral reefs (Moorea) and on morphological approaches indicates that approximately half of the fish familie...
Article
It is well accepted that the complexity of functional systems may mitigate performance trade-offs. However, data supporting this theory are hard to find because they need to be based on a functional system with different complexity levels in closely related species. The Pomacentridae (damselfishes) provide an excellent opportunity to test this hypo...
Article
Different studies suggest some social calls could be used in fish identification if their specificity is unambiguously assessed. Sounds of different populations of piranhas Serrasalmus maculatus Kner, 1858 were recorded to determine their homogeneity between rivers inside a single basin (Araguari and Grande River, upper Paraná River basin) and betw...
Article
Full-text available
Mochokid catfish offer a distinct opportunity to study a communication system transitioning to a new signaling channel because some produce sounds and others electric discharges. Both signals are generated using an elastic spring system (ESS), which includes a protractor muscle innervated by motoneurons within the protractor nucleus that also has a...
Article
Full-text available
Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) is a non-intrusive and cost-effective method capable of providing high-resolution, long-term information on the status and health of vocal populations and communities. To successfully monitor the same species over wide geographical and temporal scales, it is necessary to characterise the range of sound variability,...
Article
The ability to produce sounds has been reported in various Ostraciidae but not deeply studied. In some Ostracion species, two different sound‐producing muscles allow these boxfishes to produce two different kinds of sounds in a sequence. This study investigates sound production in another Indo‐Pacific species, the longhorn cowfish Lactoria cornuta...
Article
Full-text available
The genus Pygocentrus contains three valid piranha species (P. cariba, P. nattereri and P. piraya) that are allopatric in tropical and subtropical freshwater environments of South America. This study uses acoustic features to differentiate the three species. Sounds were recorded in P. cariba, two populations of P. nattereri (red-and yellow-bellied)...
Article
Serrasalmus marginatus is a piranha species native from the lower Paraná River basin and invasive in the upper Paraná River basin since the 1980s. In piranhas, sounds of different species have different features. The aim of this study was to investigate if the sounds produced by this species could be used to distinguish two morphotypes: red and yel...
Article
We characterised, for the first-time, the sound production of black-chinned tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron and show differences with that of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus in a hybridization pairing context. Although both species were able to produce drum sounds, they showed different acoustic features. Drum sounds were produced in aggressiv...
Article
The few works on audition in sharks and rays concern only adult specimens. We report the hearing abilities in the dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula at different stages, from embryos that still have their yolk sac inside their egg, to juveniles. Hearing development corresponds to an increase in the frequency range from 100−300 Hz in early pre‐hatching s...
Article
Full-text available
How vocal organisms share acoustic space has primarily received attention in terrestrial environments. Comparable studies in marine environments, however, remain rare. By recording sounds on a coral reef in French Polynesia for 48 h and 24 h, this study provides first insights on how different sound types are distributed within the acoustic space a...
Cover Page
Full-text available
Marine environments are far from being silent and coral reefs in particular house a large variety of vocal fishes. How can the different species communicate efficiently and avoid cacophony? Fishes from French Polynesia may optimize their communication by selecting specific time and spectral windows to insert their signals within the acoustic space....
Article
Full-text available
To what extent do modifications in the nervous system and peripheral effectors contribute to novel behaviors? Using a combination of morphometric analysis, neuroanatomical tract tracing and intracellular neuronal recording, we address this question in a sound producing and a weakly electric species of synodontid catfish, Synodontis grandiops and S....
Article
In any vertebrate group, tooth shape is known to fit with a biological function related to diet. However, little is known about the relationships between diet and tooth microstructure and composition in teleost fishes. In this work, we describe the external morphology, internal microstructure and elemental composition of the oral teeth of three rep...
Article
Although several bioacoustics investigations have shed light on the acoustic communication of Mediterranean fish species, the occurrence of fish sounds has never been reported below 40 m depth. This study assessed the occurrence of fish sounds at greater depths by monitoring the soundscape of a Mediterranean submarine canyon (Calvi, France) thanks...
Article
Although many fish species are vocal, the use of fish sounds for aquaculture management and wild population protection has not received much attention. In this study, sound production of three members of the Sciaenidae family was monitored before and during spawning in aquaculture facilities. The species examined include the meagre Argyrosomus regi...
Article
Full-text available
Passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) is a non‐invasive technique that uses hydrophones to monitor populations and ecosystem dynamics. Although many applications of PAM have been developed in recent years, it has never been used to identify a calling marine species. The south pass of Fakarava Atoll, French Polynesia, hosts spawning events of many reef...
Article
Cetaceans represent the most diverse clade of extant marine tetrapods. Although the restructuring of oceans could have contributed to their diversity , other factors might also be involved. Similar to ichthyosaurs and sharks, variation of morphological traits could have promoted the colonization of new ecological niches and supported their diversif...
Presentation
Full-text available
Passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) uses hydrophones to record all components of underwater soundscapes, including fish calls. Several studies have used PAM to investigate different aspects of vocal fish species, such as presence, distribution, relative abundance, diel, lunar and seasonal cycle of activity as well as for delimitating spawning areas a...
Article
Among piranhas, sound production is known in carnivorous species, whereas herbivorous species were thought to be mute. Given that these carnivorous sonic species have a complex sonic apparatus, we hypothesize that intermediate forms could be found in other serrasalmid species. The results highlight the evolutionary transition from a simple sound-pr...
Article
Among piranhas, sound production is known in carnivorous species, whereas herbivorous species were thought to be mute. Given that these carnivorous sonic species have a complex sonic apparatus, we hypothesize that intermediate forms could be found in other serrasalmid species. The results highlight the evolutionary transition from a simple sound-pr...
Presentation
Full-text available
Submarine canyons are key structures for ecosystem functioning in the Mediterranean Sea. This study was conducted in the canyon of Calvi (North-West Corsica, France) by using a combination of Static Acoustic Monitoring (SAM) and hydrophone integrated gliders (Seaexplorer, Alseamar). During summer 2016 and 2017, three SAM campaigns (-125 m to -150 m...
Article
Full-text available
The /Kwa/ vocalization dominates the soundscape of Posidonia oceanica meadows but the identity of the species emitting this peculiar fish sound remains a mystery. Information from sounds recorded in the wild indicates that the emitting candidates should be abundant, nocturnal and benthic. Scorpaena spp. combine all these characteristics. This study...
Article
Serrasalmid fishes form a highly specialized group of biters that show a large trophic diversity, ranging from pacus able to crush seeds to piranhas capable of cutting flesh. Their oral jaw system has been hypothesized to be forceful, but variation in bite performance and morphology with respect to diet has not previously been investigated. We test...
Article
Full-text available
In fishes, sonic abilities for communication purpose usually involve a single mechanism. We describe here the sonic mechanism and sounds in two species of boxfish, the spotted trunkfish Ostracion meleagris and the yellow boxfish Ostracion cubicus. The sonic mechanism utilizes a T-shaped swimbladder with a swimbladder fenestra and two separate sonic...
Chapter
This chapter is targeted to a broad scientific audience such as students and non-specialists who would like to explore and understand the diversity of the head, jaws and cranial muscles encountered within the large class of ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii). Actinopterygians are a wide group of bony fishes including more than 30,000 species, which...
Article
Full-text available
• Rare and cryptic fish species such as the cusk‐eel Ophidion rochei (Műller, 1845) (Ophidiiformes), an endemic sand‐dwelling Mediterranean fish, are likely to go undetected by traditional non‐invasive monitoring techniques commonly used to survey biodiversity. • Although the cusk‐eel is distributed along the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, no s...
Article
Cusk-eels (Ophidiidae) are known sound producers, but many species live in deep water where sounds are difficult to record. For these species sonic ability has been inferred from inner anatomy. Genypterus (subfamily Ophidiinae) are demersal fishes inhabiting the continental shelf and slope at depths between 50 and 800 m. Males and females G. macula...
Article
Full-text available
The Acoustic Complexity Index (ACI) is increasingly applied to the study of biodiversity in aquatic habitats. However, it remains unknown which types of acoustic information are highlighted by this index in underwater environments. This study explored the robustness of the ACI to fine variations in fish sound abundance (i.e. number of sounds) and s...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the relationship between coral reef condition and recruitment potential is vital for the development of effective management strategies that maintain coral cover and biodiversity. Coral larvae (planulae) have been shown to use certain sensory cues to orient towards settlement habitats (e.g. the odour of live crustose coralline algae -...
Article
Full-text available
Encheliophis chardewalli was described from a single cleared and stained specimen. Twelve years later, additional specimens were found in the lagoon of Moorea (French Polynesia) in association with their host, the sea cucumber Actinopyga mauritiana. These fish were used to consolidate the species diagnosis, to validate species status and to record...
Article
Full-text available
The detection of external and internal cues alters gene expression in the brain which in turn may affect neural networks that underly behavioral responses. Previous studies have shown that gene expression profiles differ between major brain regions within individuals and between species with different morphologies, cognitive abilities and/or behavi...