E. A. Quichimbo

E. A. Quichimbo
Cardiff University | CU · School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

PhD Student

About

10
Publications
2,409
Reads
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38
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2017 - August 2017
Universidad Técnica de Cotopaxi (UTC)
Position
  • Lecturer
December 2012 - March 2015
University of Cuenca
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
October 2017 - September 2020
Cardiff University
Field of study
  • Hydrology and hydrogeology
September 2015 - August 2016
University of Birmingham
Field of study
  • Hydrogeology
October 2004 - February 2010
University of Cuenca
Field of study
  • Civil Engineering

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Dryland regions are characterised by water scarcity and are facing major challenges under climate change. One difficulty is anticipating how rainfall will be partitioned into evaporative losses, groundwater, soil moisture, and runoff (the water balance) in the future, which has important implications for water resources and dryland ecosystems. Howe...
Article
Full-text available
Challenges exist for assessing the impacts of climate and climate change on the hydrological cycle on local and regional scales, and in turn on water resources, food, energy, and natural hazards. Potential evapotranspiration (PET) represents atmospheric demand for water, which is required at high spatial and temporal resolutions to compute actual e...
Preprint
Full-text available
Dryland regions are characterized by water scarcity and are facing major challenges under climate change. One difficulty is anticipating how rainfall will be partitioned into evaporative losses, groundwater, soil moisture and runoff (the water balance) in the future, which has important implications for water resources and dryland ecosystems. Howev...
Article
Full-text available
Transmission losses from the beds of ephemeral streams are thought to be a widespread mechanism of groundwater recharge in arid and semi‐arid regions and support a range of dryland hydro‐ecology. Dryland areas cover ~40% of the Earth's land surface and groundwater resources are often the main source of freshwater. It is commonly assumed that where...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Future energy development relies on the use of alternative energy sources such as exploitation of deep geothermal energy from Hot Dry Rock (HDR). HDR reservoirs are considered strategical because of the great amounts of heat stored in deep basement. Here, a numerical model considering a discrete fracture network and data from the Soultz-Sous-Forets...
Article
Full-text available
Nowadays, there has been increasing interest in topics related to education on soil science, however, topics about learning on this science have been poorly studied, particularly the relationship between learning styles and academic performance has not yet been addressed in the literature. this study aimed to understand the different student learni...
Article
Se evaluaron seis métodos de completación de datos faltantes: razón q, razones de distancia, promedios vecinales, regresión lineal, distancia inversa ponderada (IDW) y método del vector regional (MVR); para conocer su aplicabilidad en la Subcuenca del Río Patate (SRP). La escala temporal de análisis fue mensual y comprendió un período entre 1995-20...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT The Data-Based Mechanistic (DBM) model was used in conjunction with the Kalman filter (as a data assimilation technique), to predict the discharge from a sub-catchment located in the upper part of the Paute basin. The results showed that this conjunctive use of the DBM model and the Kalman filter produced better predictions of the discharg...
Article
Full-text available
A Data-Based Mechanistic (DBM) model and the Nedbor-Afstromnings Model (NAM) were applied to simulate the rainfall-runoff relationship of two Andean basins, different in size, located in southern Ecuador. This article provides a comparative analysis of both modeling approaches, with emphasis on the evaluation of the model performance. The study rev...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Availability and quality of water resources have been threatened over the past decades (Gleeson et al., 2012). It has been estimated that by 2030 the global population will rise to around 8.3 billion and to 11 billion by 2100. It will put more pressure to our planet by increasing the demand of more food, biofuel and urban services (Foley et al., 2011; Rulli et al., 2013) with the increasing degradation of water, land, biodiversity and climatic conditions (Foley et al., 2011). This implies that more water and more land will be necessary to sustain human activities (Mekonnen and Hoekstra, 2012; Nijdam et al., 2012; SERI, 2013). In this context, the use of groundwater resources is highlighted by their capacity to supply the development of human activities. It is estimated that groundwater resources supply around 42% of the water required for irrigation purposes, 36% of domestic uses and around 27% of the water needed for industrial activities (Döll et al., 2012). This situation is even worse in dryland regions, regions that represent ~35% of the global landmass and support a population of around 2 billion people. Water resources in this regions reaching critical situation as scarcity problems increase. For this reason, quantifying the amount and distribution of groundwater recharge is thus fundamental for determining sustainable rates of groundwater resource use whilst maintaining environmental flows.