Dylan Gaffney

Dylan Gaffney
University of Oxford | OX · St John's College

Master of Arts

About

23
Publications
11,421
Reads
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212
Citations
Introduction
Dylan Gaffney is a Research Fellow at St John's College, University of Oxford. His research focusses on the archaeology of Island Southeast Asia and the Pacific, especially the circum-New Guinea region.
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - present
University of Otago
Position
  • Assistant Research Fellow

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Pleistocene water crossings, long thought to be an innovation of Homo sapiens, may extend beyond our species to encompass Middle and Early Pleistocene Homo. How- ever, it remains unclear how water crossings differed among hominin populations, the extent to which Homo sapiens are uniquely flexible in these adaptive behaviors, and how the tempo and s...
Article
Moving into montane rainforests was a unique behavioural innovation developed by Pleistocene Homo sapiens as they expanded out of Africa and through Southeast Asia and Sahul for the first time. However, faunal sequences from these environments that shed light on past hunting practices are rare. In this paper we assess zooarchaeological evidence fro...
Book
Full-text available
Permanent link to open access version: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/10586 Materialising Ancestral Madang documents the emergence of pottery production processes and exchange networks along the northeast coast of New Guinea during the last millennium before the present. This dynamic period in the Pacific’s human past involved important fluctuations...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Eggshell is an understudied archaeological material with potential to clarify past interactions between humans and birds. We apply an analytical method to legacy collections of Late Pleistocene to mid-Holocene cassowary eggshell and demonstrate that early foragers in the montane rainforests of New Guinea preferentially collected eggs i...
Chapter
This article examines three key aspects of New Guinea Highlands prehistory, with important implications for regional and global archaeology, including evidence for (1) adaptive flexibility at high altitudes, particularly within montane rainforests and grasslands; (2) plant-food production and cultivation in the tropics; and (3) the emergence of inc...
Article
New Guinea was host to some of the most complex maritime interaction networks in the tropics. We take a multi-proxy approach to investigate the foodways at the heart of the extensive Madang exchange network in the last millennium before the present: 1) invertebrate zooarchaeological analysis identifies the dependence on shellfish collecting from th...
Article
This paper reports on aspects of the production and trade of nineteenth century Chinese opium pipe bowls based on an examination of an assemblage from a Chinese goldfields settlement in New Zealand. Using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) we characterised the cla...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is the first ethnographic description of ceramic sago oven production in the Raja Ampat Islands of West Papua. These rectilinear ovens are widespread throughout eastern Indonesia, used to bake sago flour into small 'cakes, ' which can be stored during times of food shortage or used in exchange. Little is known about the emergence of this...
Poster
This year marks the 150th anniversary of the establishment of the University of Otago. The University is currently in the middle of a major phase of construction and renovation, and the Southern Pacific Archaeological Research (SPAR) team has been working alongside the University to manage the effects of this programme on archaeological sites and h...
Article
Full-text available
Full paper available at https://doi.org/10.1007/s12520-018-0713-8 via Open Access This paper investigates how coastal mobility and a community’s place within regional trade networks intersect with technological organisation. To do this, we identified different types of lithic production and exchange during the late pre-colonial period at three coa...
Article
Full-text available
Shell valuable exchange in the New Guinea Highlands has been a key interest in anthropology, providing insight into economics, aesthetics, and social stratification among banded communities. This article describes how shell exchange at ethnographic present reflects deeper historical processes. We trace the origins and subsequent changes in shell us...
Article
Full-text available
Northeast New Guinea will be an important area for future archaeological research, in modelling both Pleistocene and Late Holocene migrations into the Pacific Islands. To make some initial steps towards redressing a relative absence of archaeological fieldwork in the region, we undertook ground survey around Wapain in inland Madang, locating a numb...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines a central concern in archaeological research: the interplay between technological and social flux over the longue durée . This is done by describing ceramic technological continuity and change, and its correspondence with broader social processes, on the northeast coast of New Guinea in the recent past. It presents new ethnograp...
Article
Full-text available
This book details investigations into the archaeology of Madang District, Papua New Guinea. Specifically, several important archaeological sites on the coast and offshore islands are examined. In 2014, the authors completed a survey around Madang Lagoon along with Bilbil Island and Yabob Island, and excavated two sites: Tilu at Malmal village and N...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents archaeological data critical to our understanding of the pre-colonial past along the northeast coast of New Guinea. Two archaeological sites from coastal and offshore Madang, Papua New Guinea, were excavated to establish the timing of colonization by Bel (Austronesian) speakers, and the subsequent emergence of their trade and...
Article
The terminal Pleistocene/Holocene boundary (approximately 12–8 thousand years ago) represented a major ecological threshold for humans, both as a significant climate transition and due to the emergence of agriculture around this time. In the highlands of New Guinea, climatic and environmental changes across this period have been highlighted as pote...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the archaeological collections accumulated by Sue Bulmer during her time in the New Guinea Highlands. Bulmer used this collection as a basis to investigate key themes in the island's prehistory. We focus on several of these research themes, established in the early years, but which remain pertinent: the occupation of the interio...
Article
Full-text available
The first human arrivals in northern Sahul (New Guinea) encountered new environments, flora and fauna, yet they appear to have rapidly adapted to the challenges of settlement in these different ecological niches. Our paper looks at these adaptations and makes a contribution in understanding the temporal and geographical diversity of rainforest envi...
Article
Full-text available
Austronesian speaking peoples left Southeast Asia and entered the Western Pacific c.4000-3000 years ago, continuing on to colonise Remote Oceania for the first time, where they became the ancestral populations of Polynesians. Understanding the impact of these peoples on the mainland of New Guinea before they entered Remote Oceania has eluded archae...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
This project seeks to unravel the dynamics of ancient human migration, cultural transformation, and exchange at the gateway between Island Southeast Asia and the Pacific.