Dustin Harp

Dustin Harp
University of Texas at Arlington | UTA · Department of Communication

Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Madison

About

34
Publications
11,408
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
982
Citations
Introduction
From a critical/cultural theoretical perspective my research investigates the intersections of women and marginalized groups, journalism, and new media (Internet, blogging, and social networks) to better understand the role of mass media in establishing and reinforcing hierarchies of power. Much of my work concentrates on how women (particularly female politicians) are represented in news.
Additional affiliations
August 2011 - November 2015
University of Texas at Arlington
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
January 2003 - June 2011
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (34)
Chapter
Harp and Bachmann highlight recent research at the intersection of feminist media theories, women, politics, female politicians, and media while noting that a majority of research tends to analyze news and mainstream media content. They also discuss some promising theoretical perspectives within the field before offering two areas that they believe...
Chapter
Since its first forays as an academic discipline, feminist media theory and research have made important contributions to our understandings of women’s status, gender ideologies, and the complex circumstances that define and often constrain women’s lives. It continues to do so in the current globalized world and increasingly complex media landscape...
Article
A textual analysis of 312 columns penned by women in 10 prominent U.S. newspapers shows that one-tenth of articles articulated issues from a feminist standpoint, usually matters of gender equality. Findings show the range of how gender issues are publicly presented by females in major outlets, and highlight that feminist concerns are yet to be main...
Chapter
Through an analysis of media discourse, Harp offers evidence of cultural misogyny during the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Her analysis includes an examination of signs and T-shirts displayed by supporters of then Republican hopeful Donald Trump, the misogyny displayed by the BernieBros—a particularly vocal group of Bernie Sanders supporters—and...
Book
Feminist Approaches to Media Theory and Research tackles the breadth and depth of feminist perspectives in the field of media studies through essays and research that reflect on the present and future of feminist research and theory at the intersections of women, gender, media, activism, and academia. The volume includes original chapters on divers...
Article
This study, using the Mary Kay LeTourneau interview on ABC’s 20/20 television program, investigates how social media coupled with citizens’ voices interact with mainstream media in the telling of a story and the construction of collective memory. Grounded in discourse analysis, this research examines the 20/20 story and accompanying Twitter convers...
Article
With a trailblazing political career, Hillary Clinton has been the focus of media attention for decades. This study examines 21 US magazine covers of the former First Lady and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate from 2010 through 2015—prior to her official bid for presidency—to investigate what these depictions of Clinton say about her and the r...
Article
Despite important inroads, women’s marginalization in the public sphere is still very real. From a feminist theoretical perspective, and informed by Guy Debord’s conceptualization of the society of spectacle, this study examines local and national newspaper coverage of Wendy Davis’s filibuster to block an abortion-restricting bill in the Texas Stat...
Article
Despite inroads made toward gender equality, research has shown that news coverage of female politicians typically follows gendered lines that disregard women’s competence in political affairs. Grounded in a feminist theoretical framework, this textual analysis examines articles from eight news websites covering then U.S. Secretary of State Hillary...
Article
Full-text available
While feminism is a heterogeneous and complex ideological perspective, mainstream news media have routinely portrayed it in simplistic terms and as social deviance. Within a context of increasing visibility of public women in the political arena in the United States – many of them self-proclaimed feminists – this study examines and illustrates the...
Article
Empirical and anecdotal evidence shows that the news media are male-dominated. This study updates the extant literature on women's representation in the op-ed pages of ten U.S. newspapers. A content analysis showed that female authors are moving beyond topics traditionally linked to females and are writing columns on topics such as politics and eco...
Article
Full-text available
This discourse analysis explores traditional and feminist articulations of rape in online mediated discourse regarding the sexual attack on CBS journalist Lara Logan in Egypt in February 2011. Examination of 175 stories and links in the top ten news blogs in the United States showed that the blogosphere contested traditional rape narratives that bl...
Article
Full-text available
Journalists do not tell audiences the truth but versions of stories they understand to be true based on what they have seen and know. This comparative analysis of 41 US and Brazilian news reports investigates the first return of an international child abductee from the United States to Brazil and back: Sean Goldman. Framing theory along with the id...
Article
Full-text available
This quantitative and qualitative analysis of Time and Newsweek explores how women are incorporated into a globalization discourse that often is seen as a masculinized public sphere. Results indicate that although female journalists integrate women into the news more than their male counterparts, females are invisible in globalization discourse. Wh...
Article
Full-text available
As activists increasingly use the Internet to bypass traditional media gatekeepers, disseminate their own messages, and mobilize protests, this study explores how activists in the United States and Latin America view activism in relation to mainstream and alternative media, particularly online media. Results from a quantitative and qualitative surv...
Article
Visual images in news photographs guide individuals’ understandings of people, places and events, especially when news audiences are unable to personally experience those represented images. When 41 Time newsmagazine covers from the first five years of the U.S.-led war on Iraq are considered through a framing analysis, four frames surface: The Sani...
Article
Social networking sites (SNS) are credited with organizing protesters in Colombia and Guatemala, and mobilizing voters in the United States. With SNS increasingly used to mobilize collective action, this cross-cultural study surveyed activists in the United States and Latin America to examine how respondents perceived the usefulness and the potenti...
Article
Using a cross-cultural framework, this study relies on survey data to examine how activists in China, Latin America, and the United States use social networking sites for their mobilizing efforts. Activists in China assigned greater importance to social media to promote debate. Those in Latin America expressed more apprehensions about the ease of u...
Article
From a feminist standpoint, this study provides an updated analysis to the age-old subject of women and war reporting. A content analysis of 406 stories from Time magazine explores the intersection of U.S. war reporting and gender in the coverage of the U.S. war in Iraq. Relying on feminist theories, this research dissected the normative method of...
Article
Given the increasing uptake of the social network site Facebook, mass communication researchers have begun focusing on what drives people to use the site and what kinds of information they interact with. Perhaps because of the relative novelty of Facebook, little research has scratched beneath the surface to explore why people engage in certain fun...
Article
Full-text available
This study explored how female journalists affect news content when holding positions of power, reaching a critical mass in the newsroom, and covering an issue that appeals to them. The study compared a male-dominated news organization's coverage of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine with coverage by a more gender-balanced organization in term...
Article
Media discourse scrutinized Massachusetts' Governor Jane Swift when she bore twins but Governor Sarah Palin's pregnancy garnered different reactions. From a feminist perspective, this research uses articulation theory to examine discursive links and frames in news coverage of Swift and Palin as governors and mothers—both of whom were members of the...
Article
This study examines and compares discursive constructions and performance of gender in Sarah Palin's media portrayal during the first week of her nomination to the Republican vice-presidential candidacy. Using a discourse analysis of online video clips posted by 5 U.S. network news websites, the authors found a discourse rich with complexity in bot...
Article
Using indexing theory as a framework, this content analysis of 2003–2007 Time coverage explores the range of dissenting voices of the war in news dialogue. Findings show that war criticism remained constant throughout the years and was largely targeted toward the Bush administration. While most dissent originated from official sources, American and...
Article
Full-text available
The study is based on a multi-wave panel survey on media use, and political and social attitudes among 12- to 17-year-olds. The results show that African Americans were more likely than Whites to engage in civic activities, politically participate in online and offline settings, take part in political consumerism, talk about news, follow the news,...
Article
Full-text available
Hall (1980) argued that the media articulate non-necessary connections between messages and socially acceptable ideas. This research analyzes the process through which news magazines made a strong connection between Lynndie England and the Abu Ghraib prison scandal and how gender affected these articulations. By making England the symbol of the sca...
Article
This study examined gender inequity among the most-read political blogs on the Web. Sampling over one year from blog rankings, we found that 10% of the top bloggers were women. Discourse analysis of bloggers' explanations for gender disparity revealed three dominant beliefs: women do not blog about politics, women's blogs lack quality, and top blog...
Article
After nearly a century of publishing explicitly named women's pages, US newspapers starting in 1969 and into the 1970s began renaming them ‘style’ or ‘lifestyle’ sections, theoretically meaning they were for a general audience. This research investigates industry discourse during this time to determine what those in newsrooms were thinking about th...
Article
Full-text available
New communication technologies in general and the Internet in particular have led some scholars to speculate that we are ushering in a new era of pluralistic and democratic communication. This article takes a critical look at this optimistic view. Using textual analysis and a feminist theoretical framework, the authors examine pornography sites on...

Network

Cited By